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Trimming hardwood plugs/dowels

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LancsRick

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Afternoon all!

Room 1 of the house rennovation is progressing, with a bunch of skirting and doorframes turning up in the next couple of weeks which should keep me entertained for a weekend. I've never fitted a doorframe from scratch before so I'm getting a friend in to help me who has (and I've seen their work so I know they know what they're doing!).

My question is around hiding screwheads on the frame itself. The architrave I will just use adhesive, but for the two vertical linings I intend to use thermalite anchors in the surrounding blockwork. My current plan is to use offcuts from the lining to cut plugs out from (plugcutter recommendations welcomed), and then trim them flush to cover the screws.

I've seen trains of thought that recommend either a chisel plane or by hand with a chisel and small mallet. From experience, and given that this will be European oak, so fairly tough, what would the experienced amongst you suggest? I can practice technique on offcuts ahead of time.

Cheers.
 

OldDave

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Have you seen the little Japanese flush cut saws (Kugihiki)?
No outward set on the teeth - so if they cut anywhere near as nicely as my duzuki or kataba saws - oak won’t be a problem.
 

MikeG.

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Cut them a millimetre or two up, then either a block plane (if you have access) or a chisel. Either do the job nicely. Use a slicing or skew action with the chisel rather than just trying to blast across at 90 degrees. Finish off with a scraper, or use your chisel as a scraper, just for a couple of strokes.
 

Trevanion

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I tend to try to hide fixings behind the door stops, plugs would work just as well though.
 

Seiken

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I plugged about 300 screws making garden furniture last year and found a flush cut saw (Irwin make one that is cheap and does the job) then a block plane/glasspaper as necessary worked.
 

Phil Pascoe

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^^^ as said, try to hide most of them. If you make your own plugs, you will see which way the grain runs when you break them out. Try to use the all running in the same direction, or at least if you put then close to corner or the floor don't insert them where you will have to try to trim them against the grain. You don't want them to chip below the surface when you trim them if you're varnishing or oiling.
 

thetyreman

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as phil said just make sure the grain is running in the right direction, especially with oak.

I use the veritas plug cutter and got it with a flush cut saw from axminster because it was on offer at the time so got a good deal, if you are using a chisel make sure it's freshly sharpened.
 

xy mosian

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MikeG.":253rnotv said:
Cut them a millimetre or two up, then either a block plane (if you have access) or a chisel. Either do the job nicely. Use a slicing or skew action with the chisel rather than just trying to blast across at 90 degrees. Finish off with a scraper, or use your chisel as a scraper, just for a couple of strokes.
A hole, just larger than the plug, in the middle of a flatish piece of plastic milk bottle works well as a protective mask. It helps to make the subsequent trimming less work.
xy
 

Bm101

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Rick I use one of the lidl small pull saws. There's a thread on here singing it's praises somewhere. Cut a mil off and pare if you can't take a risk as mentioned. Normally I just hold the blade flush with one hand and bend the handle slightly out and it's fine. I love the saw for the price hence when they are in lidl I tend to buy a spare or two.
Pm me your address and I'll stick one in the post mate.
Cheers
Chris

Edit:
lidl-japanese-saw-t105802-15.html
 

ColeyS1

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--Tom--":3hl4bsv1 said:
Trevanion":3hl4bsv1 said:
I tend to try to hide fixings behind the door stops
This was the approach I took
How wide are the door stops ?
I always use two fixings instead of just using one in the middle. I think it helps stop the lining legs from twisting and makes for a more solid frame.

Sent from my SM-G960F using Tapatalk
 

HOJ

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I have various plug cutters, I also bought a set of these and its bigger brother set, a couple of years ago; Plug cutters they both work fine, but are not tapered, so need a bit of fiddling to get them in, then just a nice and sharp chisel to pare them off, you will need to check the head size of the fixing screw for a compatible plug size, and, it is a lot easier to cut the plugs on a drill press.

Definitely put pairs of fixings in, been to quite a few jobs with linings fixed with just single vertical fixings, where the frame pulls round, when door the is fully opened, especially so when you have a heavy door hanging off it.

You may also need to get some packers or make some, as I would assume the structural opening will be bigger than the door lining frame size, for wiggle room.

Not sure about just gluing on the architraves though, could be tricky, you may need to compromise and put a couple of mechincal fixings (pins) in them some where.
 

Phil Pascoe

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If you glue the architrave it only takes a few panel or better veneer pins partly knocked in - they can be pulled out afterwards and the holes filled. A veneer pin will hardly leave a hole. My b.i.l was a chippie in NZ - he told me that they always glue the architraves. Obviously you don't need to worry about the pins being steel in oak if you pull them out.
 

LancsRick

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Thanks all. I've got some decent chisels and a couple of block planes so I'll go down that route. I've ordered a plug cutter and matching forstner from Wealden (any excuse!).

Thanks for the offer Chris but I'm sorted now. Appreciate the gesture though matey :).
 

toolsntat

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Those little (lidl etc) pull saws are the ultimate tool for this job and I'm sure you will want to try one before it's finished.
Cheers Andy
 
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