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Trickle vents?

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Doug71

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I am replacing some single glazed windows in a hairdressers, just simple stormproof style, new ones will be double glazed with draught strips as required by regs.

The existing have been in for years and have no trickle vents therefore I don't have to fit them in the new ones but just wondered if it would be better if I did?

The existing windows are often covered in condensation, guess it's a combination of single glazing, hair washing/drying and all the hot air from the old ladies gossiping.

The owner isn't bothered and presumes double glazing will cure all the problems but it's and oldish building and I worry once it's sealed up with the new windows (and door) they might start getting condensation on the walls etc.

Don't want to kick off the whole double glazing debate, windows are rotten, need replacing and have to conform with regs, just wondered if people think trickle vents will be worth fitting?

Any opinions?
 

Brandlin

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I think you answered your own question.

Yes I would put in the trickle vents. You know the building is wet and its function will make it humid. So any opportunity to provide some airflow and release of humidy seems to make sense.

Not only that, but if your customer assumes, as you say, that double glazing will solve the problem then you want to be sure you have done all you can to solve it rather than have an argument with them when they are dissatisfied.
 

lurker

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Other than commenting that the DG might not cure the condensation problems, there is not much you can do.

You have done the work you are contracted to do and I think you need to be alert to her blaming you for trying to hike the bill.
 

kevinlightfoot

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In my experience trickle vents even when fitted will be closed up by the tenants,especially women they think draughts come through glass so they will think a gale will blow through a slot in the frame.However if regs say they must be fitted then so be it,I don't think they will cure condensation in those conditions though even with double glazing.You need to educate them on how to open windows!
 

LBCarpentry

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Doug71":1q4ynsez said:
I am replacing some single glazed windows in a hairdressers, just simple stormproof style, new ones will be double glazed with draught strips as required by regs.

The existing have been in for years and have no trickle vents therefore I don't have to fit them in the new ones but just wondered if it would be better if I did?

The existing windows are often covered in condensation, guess it's a combination of single glazing, hair washing/drying and all the hot air from the old ladies gossiping.

The owner isn't bothered and presumes double glazing will cure all the problems but it's and oldish building and I worry once it's sealed up with the new windows (and door) they might start getting condensation on the walls etc.

Don't want to kick off the whole double glazing debate, windows are rotten, need replacing and have to conform with regs, just wondered if people think trickle vents will be worth fitting?

Any opinions?
Without even reading any replies.....

I vote yes, include trickle vents
 

sunnybob

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Many, many years ago, when natural gas arrived, the man came from the gas board and converted the gas cooker. He told my mum that there was not enough ventilation in the kitchen and she could die of the fumes. So (long before double glazing),he put a 6" vent axia spinner in a small window pane. The second he was out the door mum covered that with clear plastic and tape and it NEVER got opened again.
Good luck explaining to the customer they have to have ventilation. (hammer) (hammer)

On the other hand, I have seen trickle vents CAUSE condensation in winter when the cold air comes through the vent and slides down across the warm glass. Open the vent, the window mists. Close the vent, the window clears.

Strongly suggest to the owner to invest in a portable de humidifier, explaining about all the hair washing causing the problem.
When we moved here the building was wringing wet (all new reinforced concrete and everything plastered). To make it worse the first winter all we had was a mobile gas heater. There was black mould in the corner of every upstairs room. We were getting into a bed that felt wet. We bought a de humidifier and that thing took out 3 litres of water a day for several weeks. Now the building is dried out and we have central heating and the problem is gone.
 

Trevanion

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I haven't seen trickle vents specified on any of our stuff for maybe three years? Used to do quite a lot of them before that but maybe they've fallen out of favour with the powers that be?
 
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