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Trend/Yeti smart bench. Anyone bought?

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Ollie78

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Just had a quick Google as never seen it before.
At that price you could get a proper machine. I suspect it has its use cases but I can see issues with the design. If you go to some cnc forums you can find lots of information on machine design.

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Yeah I think it’s main bonus is that it’s ‘portable’ or at least it doesn’t require the space that a full size machine does. I’m just wondering if that portability means it will lose a lot of the qualities of a big machine.
 

shed9

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Had to google it myself as well. I have a few CNC machines including two scratch built 8x4 precision machines so I can appreciate the space saving format. The details are fairly sparse and I would question why that is but on the surface of it I can see that being a very viable option for a lot of people. The main issue that sticks out for me at this early stage is the use of lead screws, not the best method and I wouldn't use that motion control option in the same description as a precision machine.
 
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Had to google it myself as well. I have a few CNC machines including two scratch built 8x4 precision machines so I can appreciate the space saving format. The details are fairly sparse and I would question why that is but on the surface of it I can see that being a very viable option for a lot of people. The main issue that sticks out for me at this early stage is the use of lead screws, not the best method and I wouldn't use that motion control option in the same description as a precision machine.
What do you mean by lead screws?
My other little gripe is that I know yeti is a fairly new startup but they appear to have Trend on board who’s aren’t. 3D printed plastic parts for a prototype are fine but on the real deal they should be moulded. I know the cost of making injection moulds are many thousands of pounds but surely with trend behind them that shouldn’t be an issue.
(if you look at the lcd surround for example it’s 3D printed. I know it should be ok but to my mind 3D printing isn’t advanced enough yet.)
 

shed9

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What do you mean by lead screws?
Lead screws are essentially deep helical threaded rods that drive the xyz axis mechanisms either via turning a held nut on the rod or turning the rod itself moving that fixed nut. There is inherent backlash in this design, its not very efficient and wears relatively quicker than other designs like ball screws and rack & pinion for example.

My other little gripe is that I know yeti is a fairly new startup but they appear to have Trend on board who’s aren’t. 3D printed plastic parts for a prototype are fine but on the real deal they should be moulded. I know the cost of making injection moulds are many thousands of pounds but surely with trend behind them that shouldn’t be an issue.
(if you look at the lcd surround for example it’s 3D printed. I know it should be ok but to my mind 3D printing isn’t advanced enough yet.)
A few years back I would have agreed but these days with 3D printers being readily accessible I'd see this a plus. If Yeti develop an improvement they can release the STL files for end users to print their own. Also means you could potentially print a repair part if need be. Lulzbot and Prusa 3D Printers are a good example of this product approach, they ship complete using parts printed on other Lulzbot and Prusa machines and should you need to upgrade / replace parts you simply print it on your own machine. This method will become a lot more sustainable in the long run especially with 3D printing taking the strives it has in recent years.
 
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Lead screws are essentially deep helical threaded rods that drive the xyz axis mechanisms either via turning a held nut on the rod or turning the rod itself moving that fixed nut. There is inherent backlash in this design, its not very efficient and wears relatively quicker than other designs like ball screws and rack & pinion for example.


A few years back I would have agreed but these days with 3D printers being readily accessible I'd see this a plus. If Yeti develop an improvement they can release the STL files for end users to print their own. Also means you could potentially print a repair part if need be. Lulzbot and Prusa 3D Printers are a good example of this product approach, they ship complete using parts printed on other Lulzbot and Prusa machines and should you need to upgrade / replace parts you simply print it on your own machine. This method will become a lot more sustainable in the long run especially with 3D printing taking the strives it has in recent years.
Yeah I do see your point on the 3D print thing.
I do have an engineering background but I am not conversant with cnc machines. Reason I was looking at this particular one is because of its small footprint and the fact it doesn’t take up the workshop room when not in use. I don’t have the space to lose 8x4 worth of room.
I just wonder if it’s a proper professional/commercial machine or rather a high end DIY machine.
 

shed9

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Yeah I do see your point on the 3D print thing.
I do have an engineering background but I am not conversant with cnc machines.
I just had a better look at this, the lead screws are only used on the Z axis and the XY are rack and pinion, direct drive (not geared) but rack and pinion none the less. Lead screws on the Z axis are not a bad option, maybe a very slight issue with 3D relief work but for cutting out sheet it will be perfect. I suspect at that level you won't be able to detect any discernible backlash given the type of work it's aimed at. It actually looks well made, well thought out and the price seems about right. Looks like a good company as well, they appear to be based in Portishead with a real UK base. Must be honest if I was in the market for an 8x4 CNC machine this would tick a lot of boxes for me. There are compromises in the design but given the price point those compromises seem to make sense in my opinion. Not sure what the Trend affiliation is as they sell CMT cutters on their site.
Reason I was looking at this particular one is because of its small footprint and the fact it doesn’t take up the workshop room when not in use. I don’t have the space to lose 8x4 worth of room.
I know the feeling, I built my 8x4's vertically using a slight camber to aid holding it down. Be aware that this Yeti machine will still take that 8x4 real estate when a full sheet is loaded. Obvious statement I know but my point is that you still need the footprint when it's in operation and you need to keep a clear path around the tool whilst that gantry is moving up and down.
I just wonder if it’s a proper professional/commercial machine or rather a high end DIY machine.
I don't think it's specifically or primarily aimed at the hobby DIY market although they will clearly tap into that at with those price option. I think they are touting it as a job site / location CNC machine. It's also not a pro commercial tool but then I also don't think it's pretending to be that either. All in all it looks like it's worth the money to me. I f I was going to build that using that form model and factoring the design and development along with the motion control, framework and software component it's relatively good value for money as far as I can see.

For clarity I don't have any affiliation with Yeti, this is the first time I have genuinely been made aware of them.
 
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I just had a better look at this, the lead screws are only used on the Z axis and the XY are rack and pinion, direct drive (not geared) but rack and pinion none the less. Lead screws on the Z axis are not a bad option, maybe a very slight issue with 3D relief work but for cutting out sheet it will be perfect. I suspect at that level you won't be able to detect any discernible backlash given the type of work it's aimed at. It actually looks well made, well thought out and the price seems about right. Looks like a good company as well, they appear to be based in Portishead with a real UK base. Must be honest if I was in the market for an 8x4 CNC machine this would tick a lot of boxes for me. There are compromises in the design but given the price point those compromises seem to make sense in my opinion. Not sure what the Trend affiliation is as they sell CMT cutters on their site.

I know the feeling, I built my 8x4's vertically using a slight camber to aid holding it down. Be aware that this Yeti machine will still take that 8x4 real estate when a full sheet is loaded. Obvious statement I know but my point is that you still need the footprint when it's in operation and you need to keep a clear path around the tool whilst that gantry is moving up and down.

I don't think it's specifically or primarily aimed at the hobby DIY market although they will clearly tap into that at with those price option. I think they are touting it as a job site / location CNC machine. It's also not a pro commercial tool but then I also don't think it's pretending to be that either. All in all it looks like it's worth the money to me. I f I was going to build that using that form model and factoring the design and development along with the motion control, framework and software component it's relatively good value for money as far as I can see.

For clarity I don't have any affiliation with Yeti, this is the first time I have genuinely been made aware of them, but I will be reaching out to them later today.
Many thanks for that. Makes me feel a bit better about it.
yeah I realise it will take up that room when in use but that’s ok, I do have room to use it but not for it to be there unused if you get me. I use the same room for cabinet assembly, tolexing etc. One thing I do wonder about, is, on a full size machine I believe the parts are often held in place with a vacuum? Obviously with the narrow bed this isn’t so what’s to stop the individual parts moving about once the cut finishes? When I cut speaker openings for example I screw the inner part down and clamp the outer part as if it were to move as the cut finishes it could easily jam in the router cutter and cause untold damage. I have no issue spending the money as long as it’s a good machine.
 

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Many thanks for that. Makes me feel a bit better about it.
yeah I realise it will take up that room when in use but that’s ok, I do have room to use it but not for it to be there unused if you get me. I use the same room for cabinet assembly, tolexing etc. One thing I do wonder about, is, on a full size machine I believe the parts are often held in place with a vacuum? Obviously with the narrow bed this isn’t so what’s to stop the individual parts moving about once the cut finishes? When I cut speaker openings for example I screw the inner part down and clamp the outer part as if it were to move as the cut finishes it could easily jam in the router cutter and cause untold damage. I have no issue spending the money as long as it’s a good machine.
I totally get the room issue, most of us here don't have spare space we can allocate to machines without fully justifying it. I'm not entirely sure how work piece hold down works on this machine, I've seen a few videos where standard clamps are used (not ideal) but I suspect it's worth a chat with the company. You are correct in that a lot of 8x4 machines use vacuum suction but clearly that isn't an option here and defeats the point of its portability. I would expect the software to have built in tabbing to make your cuts whilst retaining the sheet together, it's another step but nothing a decent trim router can't clean up in a few minutes. I'd give them a call, see if there are any current users they can put you in touch with - can't hurt. They will almost certainly already have sold some units to customers with similar needs to yourself.

Personally I think the idea of affordable smaller form factor CNC's makes a lot of sense, a game changer for small shops. Have a look at the Shaper Origin as well, TTS (Festool) have recently acquired them so there has to be some mileage in the product.
 
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I totally get the room issue, most of us here don't have spare space we can allocate to machines without fully justifying it. I'm not entirely sure how work piece hold down works on this machine, I've seen a few videos where standard clamps are used (not ideal) but I suspect it's worth a chat with the company. You are correct in that a lot of 8x4 machines use vacuum suction but clearly that isn't an option here and defeats the point of its portability. I would expect the software to have built in tabbing to make your cuts whilst retaining the sheet together, it's another step but nothing a decent trim router can't clean up in a few minutes. I'd give them a call, see if there are any current users they can put you in touch with - can't hurt. They will almost certainly already have sold some units to customers with similar needs to yourself.

Personally I think the idea of affordable smaller form factor CNC's makes a lot of sense, a game changer for small shops. Have a look at the Shaper Origin as well, TTS (Festool) have recently acquired them so there has to be some mileage in the product.
Yeah I’ve seen the shaper origin but it doesn’t really lend itself to what I need.
there are quite a few customers of yeti who are on their site but I figured I’d ask on here as none of the ones they feature on their site will be saying they’re rubbish!
It’s a pity they’re not doing on site demos as i would book one. (I know they’re doing one on one video demos but really not the same)
 

shed9

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Yeah I’ve seen the shaper origin but it doesn’t really lend itself to what I need.
there are quite a few customers of yeti who are on their site but I figured I’d ask on here as none of the ones they feature on their site will be saying they’re rubbish!
It’s a pity they’re not doing on site demos as i would book one. (I know they’re doing one on one video demos but really not the same)
Yeah I'd love to justify a shaper but not sure it fits my workflow right now. Ask to be put in touch with some Yeti users, people will start talking like they are on truth serum after a couple of minutes of shared interests.
 

AaronYetiTool

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Hi Everyone! I would be more than happy to answer any questions you may have around SmartBench. I can offer a demonstration if needed.
Aaron
 
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I am from Yeti Tool :)
Cool. I’ll be getting in touch. In the meantime is there any of my questions in this thread you can answer any better than have already been (very well) answered? The hold down question for one. And your thoughts on the 3D print. Although I suspect the answer already given will be the correct answer.
cheers
Andy
 

AaronYetiTool

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Hi Andy,
I tried to write a reply but it wont let me post - annoying. Please feel free to reach out directly,
Thanks
Aaron
 

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