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Training Request - ME8 area

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Brian H

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Hi All,

As a newbie I have been quite happy putting in my time and learning tools / machines as I go. I have also purchased second hand machines as I have grown my hobby over the last 18 months... but I'm at my wits end and feel I need hands on help with my machines...

Ideally I need hands on training with my setup, or at least someone to come a long and point out what I am doing wrong... random ask... but is there anyone in Kent who has the experience and would like to take up a training request? I'm happy to pay reasonable training rate for this onsite training and cover travel. I'm in the ME8 area, so in the off chance there is someone out there who would be willing to help me get to grips setting up / maintaining / using a planer / thicknesser, table saw and bandsaw etc. I'm open for a conversation :)

I truly appreciate that any new skill requires both patience and practice to advance, I'm happy to put the time in but my style of learning hasn't gotten me very far even with reading forums and watching videos. Not looking for an easy shortcut here, looking to put the effort in but feel some hands on tutoring would jump start things significantly.

As the saying goes, if you don't ask you'll never know :)

Thanks
Brian
 

baldkev

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Now theres a good post!
I'm nowhere near you unfortunately, but good that you are approaching this the right way 👍
Machines are extremely useful and also quite dangerous. As a trade user, i have at times found that ive become complacent and had to give myself a slap. It's always worth taking the time to think through a procedure before turning the machine on... so start with extractor, workpiece support, guarding push sticks, workpiece outfeed etc.

Hopefully there's someone near you who has some time
 

Spectric

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I can recomend @Peter Sefton 's video series on the P/t and may give you a good heads up on setting & using the machine. Also can you tell us what the machines are because you may think it is your skills causing a problem when infact it is some quirk with the machine that can be resolved.
 

Jameshow

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Hi All,

As a newbie I have been quite happy putting in my time and learning tools / machines as I go. I have also purchased second hand machines as I have grown my hobby over the last 18 months... but I'm at my wits end and feel I need hands on help with my machines...

Ideally I need hands on training with my setup, or at least someone to come a long and point out what I am doing wrong... random ask... but is there anyone in Kent who has the experience and would like to take up a training request? I'm happy to pay reasonable training rate for this onsite training and cover travel. I'm in the ME8 area, so in the off chance there is someone out there who would be willing to help me get to grips setting up / maintaining / using a planer / thicknesser, table saw and bandsaw etc. I'm open for a conversation :)

I truly appreciate that any new skill requires both patience and practice to advance, I'm happy to put the time in but my style of learning hasn't gotten me very far even with reading forums and watching videos. Not looking for an easy shortcut here, looking to put the effort in but feel some hands on tutoring would jump start things significantly.

As the saying goes, if you don't ask you'll never know :)

Thanks
Brian
How about going down to your local mens shed there is normally a guy who knows his stuff!! (Not me I just make the tea and coffee!)

Or how about finding a small joinery firm with a workshop who can perhaps pop round after work?

Cheers James
 
Last edited:

Brian H

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Thanks all for taking the time to reply, really appreciate the advice.

@baldkev couldn't agree more on the safety angle, these machines if used incorrectly would be devastating! I spent a long time researching and watching videos and reading on the safe use of each before eI even purchased them. I too have the mantra of before I even think of switching on I go through that check list and carefully consider the cut and how I will approach etc. but... as you say it's easy to become complacent with time...

@Spectric I'll definitely watch Peter's video's, thanks. To be fair I think the issues I'm currently having with my SD300 planer relates to my recent replacement of knives... I've spent what felt like a lifetime trying to se my knives and I'm sure I've messed it up ;) tried the magnetic setting tools with no joy, tried the straight edge approach with a 5mm 'grab' on both sides of each of the blades, seemed ok but now when I joint an edge they are 'wonky' along the length (I've checked fence with a digital gauge and it's near perfect 90). I have a Startrite SD300 planer, Scheppach TS4010 and finally a Record 350S Bandsaw and a Fobco Star pilar drill... space is a little tight but workable ;)

@Jameshow had not thought of that! what a great idea will research local mens sheds tonight, also the joinery firm idea sounds a great idea too :)

Cheers :)
 

MARK.B.

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+1 for trying men's sheds ,hands on advice as long as it is the correct advice is probably the best and possibly safest way to go, not saying vids are of no use as there are many out there that are excellent (y):).
 

Spectric

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I would say your issue is down to the setting of the blades, on the Record Pt107 the three blades sit on springs and are clamped in place by small bolts. I tried everything and could not get all three the same, no mater what tool or method I tried and the results were to say the least poor. So had to find a solution and first thought was new drum that was spiral or tersa but nothing for the PT107. Finaly found this system which uses disposable blades which are reversable and the carrier locates on the face of the drum which means no setting up, just fit the blades and all are the same, just had to adjust tables to suit but never looked back. Had I known about this problem I would never have brought a machine that did not have easy fit pre set blades. These blades are also cheaper than the originals.

 

baldkev

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5mm 'grab' on both sides of each of the blades, seemed ok but now when I joint an edge they are 'wonky' along the length
Can you explain how you go about feeding the timber and where you put pressure on it? Also, how you select the edge to joint.... i.e belly up or down?
Essentially, the best way to straighten an edge is with the curve pointing up, feed the timber into the cutters and keep pressure over the block. Rightly or wrongly i tend to keep pressure just on the outfeed side of the block pressing down and make sure my right hand is doing forward motion. I use grip pads or push sticks on small stock. You can also easily make some grip pads with a small 90° heel to hook onto the tail end of your workpiece.
It is Essential that you arent putting forward pressure onto the timber with your hand nearing the cutter. It only takes a second to do slip and do real damage. As i fet to withing a foot of the end of the cut, i change body position so my left is propelling the timber from the outfeed position and my right is putting downward pressure behind the cutter block on outfeed side.

It works for me....
 

Woodbee2

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Hi All,

As a newbie I have been quite happy putting in my time and learning tools / machines as I go. I have also purchased second hand machines as I have grown my hobby over the last 18 months... but I'm at my wits end and feel I need hands on help with my machines...

Ideally I need hands on training with my setup, or at least someone to come a long and point out what I am doing wrong... random ask... but is there anyone in Kent who has the experience and would like to take up a training request? I'm happy to pay reasonable training rate for this onsite training and cover travel. I'm in the ME8 area, so in the off chance there is someone out there who would be willing to help me get to grips setting up / maintaining / using a planer / thicknesser, table saw and bandsaw etc. I'm open for a conversation :)

I truly appreciate that any new skill requires both patience and practice to advance, I'm happy to put the time in but my style of learning hasn't gotten me very far even with reading forums and watching videos. Not looking for an easy shortcut here, looking to put the effort in but feel some hands on tutoring would jump start things significantly.

As the saying goes, if you don't ask you'll never know :)

Thanks
Brian
If I can help I will....I could visit by arrangement.
Robert Crowborough 01892 601200 07704 601200
Cabinet Maker/Wood Machinist/C&G Qualified
 

Jacob

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Turners seem to get together in little clubs, maybe woodworkers should too. Where are these mythical "men's sheds"?
 

Brian H

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Location
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Can you explain how you go about feeding the timber and where you put pressure on it? Also, how you select the edge to joint.... i.e belly up or down?
Essentially, the best way to straighten an edge is with the curve pointing up, feed the timber into the cutters and keep pressure over the block. Rightly or wrongly i tend to keep pressure just on the outfeed side of the block pressing down and make sure my right hand is doing forward motion. I use grip pads or push sticks on small stock. You can also easily make some grip pads with a small 90° heel to hook onto the tail end of your workpiece.
It is Essential that you arent putting forward pressure onto the timber with your hand nearing the cutter. It only takes a second to do slip and do real damage. As i fet to withing a foot of the end of the cut, i change body position so my left is propelling the timber from the outfeed position and my right is putting downward pressure behind the cutter block on outfeed side.

It works for me....
Hey,

Thanks for sharing, pretty much what i have done... before I changed the blades all was working 'ok' my technique wasn't great and early doors I had a fair amount of 'scoops' early on the face of the board where I was transferring pressure incorrectly at the mid point... but after I changed the knives things have gotten wonky. So for example I face a board cup down and do a serious of light passes until I've gotten it 'flat' this seems to go ok, I check the fence to ensure it's 90 and the I run the edge to joint with the fresh face of the board pressed against the fence and my top fingers pressing down with even pressure (at least I hope) once I have sufficient length of board on the outfield side I transfer pressure across... the more I think about it the more I am suspecting I've messed up setting the knives... or a combination of poor technique and badly set knives ;)

Cheers
 

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