Track saws?

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sometimewoodworker

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A bit pricey for me should just use my circular saw against a straight edge!
I started do that, I quickly found that it was way more work while producing a ragged top edge, a snow storm and could easily wander.

Got a TS55 and rails. Virtually no chip out on the top, virtually no dust perfect dimensions every time.

my only regret, not getting the TS55 sooner.
 

JobandKnock

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A bit pricey for me should just use my circular saw against a straight edge!
I did that for yonks, although I did have a plunging saw at the time (Holz-Her so pre-guide rails).

I started do that, I quickly found that it was way more work while producing a ragged top edge, a snow storm and could easily wander.
My thoughts, too, but the home-made guide is better than a batten screwed to the top of the sheet and that in turn is better than "freehanding" it.
 

Sporky McGuffin

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I think this is one of those things where it's possible to do the job with a circular saw and a straight bit of plank, but it's dead easy to do the job with a track saw, so you can work faster and more accurately with the latter.

There are usually multiple ways to do any operation, and it's balancing kit cost against ease and speed. And what you're comfortable working with. I always found circular saws a bit pernickety whereas the tracksaw is an absolute trooper (I think there could be better/faster/smaller clamps though, they're a bit fiddly with the Centipede sometimes).
 

sometimewoodworker

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I think this is one of those things where it's possible to do the job with a circular saw and a straight bit of plank, but it's dead easy to do the job with a track saw, so you can work faster and more accurately with the latter.
Sorry there is no way that you can do the same job as a higher end tracksaw with a circular saw.

The higher end tracksaw will give glue ready accurately dimensioned splinter free cuts, that is not something I know of anyone who can regularly do with a circular saw.

if all you want is rough cut pieces that you either need to process with other tools or use in the rough state a circular saw would be the ideal tool.

Note; rough cut is subjective not objective, but there is a qualitative a difference in cut quality.
 

Spectric

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A bit pricey for me should just use my circular saw against a straight edge!
That is exactly what I did for many years, takes more time to set up and is a lot more fiddly but it works. You won't realise the advantages of a good tracksaw until you have one, then the lights come on and sheet goods are no longer a challenge.
 

Gazzarose

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I bought the Erbauer one from screwfix a few years ago
It has been a dream to use and no complaints so far. Two things I did. Got a makita track as it works on them so now have the two pack that the saw comes with plus a longer single Makita track . I also unscrewed the god awful safety device that stops it being pulled back which is just plain annoying. I also closed up the hole for better dust collection

How does yours fit on the Makita track? I've had mine about a year or so now, and bought a 3m Makita rail, then added a Makita 1.5m rail. I found the Makita rail is ever so slightly narrower than the Erbauer rail and when new the saw would only just adjust enough to snug down on the guide. Now its had a bit of use (granted one of those uses was with a diamond blade to cut about 50 patio slabs to use as cap stones!) the adjuster things have worn a bit and it's a bit loose on the Makita rails. I can't find any spares for it, at least not readily available, I may email screwfix and see what they say. I'm almost tempted to buy a 3d printer (and learn how to use 1!) and make some myself and tweak the dimensions slightly.

Oh and for a while I was using the duct tape over the hole trick to help dust extraction, but by luck I came across these Hey, I found this really awesome Etsy listing at Erbauer Plunge Saw Dust Cover | Etsy UK. A 3d printed cover for the erbauer. So it shows there's a bit of support in the aftermarket, but I can't find anything for the adjusters.
 

petermillard

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How does yours fit on the Makita track? I've had mine about a year or so now, and bought a 3m Makita rail, then added a Makita 1.5m rail. I found the Makita rail is ever so slightly narrower than the Erbauer rail and when new the saw would only just adjust enough to snug down on the guide. Now its had a bit of use (granted one of those uses was with a diamond blade to cut about 50 patio slabs to use as cap stones!) the adjuster things have worn a bit and it's a bit loose on the Makita rails. I can't find any spares for it, at least not readily available, I may email screwfix and see what they say. I'm almost tempted to buy a 3d printer (and learn how to use 1!) and make some myself and tweak the dimensions slightly.

Oh and for a while I was using the duct tape over the hole trick to help dust extraction, but by luck I came across these Hey, I found this really awesome Etsy listing at Erbauer Plunge Saw Dust Cover | Etsy UK. A 3d printed cover for the erbauer. So it shows there's a bit of support in the aftermarket, but I can't find anything for the adjusters.
The Erbauer is a dead ringer for the large Triton (TTS 185) so you maybe able to get spares from them that are interchangeable. Might be worth a look, anyway?
 

Gazzarose

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The Erbauer is a dead ringer for the large Triton (TTS 185) so you maybe able to get spares from them that are interchangeable. Might be worth a look, anyway?

Good call! Took a bit of finding, bit they are available. TTS068 is the part number for them, just have to be content with black instead of red! 😂. Tool Spares Online. ADJUST CAM They're not in stock there at the moment, but I least they're available. My brother popped down earlier, he's a cnc machine babysitter in a big artificial knee type place now, but used to be a proper machinist and can draw things on Cad. I mentioned it to him and he's going to have a go copying one. Hes going to try adding a bit more material at the tip of the cam to try and solve my problem where it wouldn't snug up tightly to the makita rail. If he can draw it, I'll find one of the 3d printing services and see if I can get some done........ That's leaves it open to someone else setting the market in erbauer track saw cams though! Maybe I could use some man maths and actually get round to buying the 3d printer I keep looking at. 150 quid printer to make a couple of £2 parts is good value right! 😂
 
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petermillard

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Are they better than the cheaper generic ones?
Cheers James
The saws? No. These two are a little bigger- 185mm blade vs 160/165mm as ‘normal’ - but the blade size is a pain as neither manufacturer offer blades as spare parts, and the depth of cut is only +12mm or so.
 
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Gazzarose

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The saws? No. These two are a little bigger- 185mm blade vs 160/165mm as ‘normal’ - but the blade size is a pain as neither manufacturer offer blades as spare parts, and the depth of cut if only +12mm or so.

For my limited use, I've bought Saxton Blades and they seem to be fine. I've only used them for cutting up cheap hardwood ply for garage shelves and bits and bobs so far though and all my work is only for myself and my garage so the quality of cut is fine.

I did a slab path in my garden in the summer and couldn't find matching cap stones for the walls, so I bought extra slabs, made a jig, and cut them up to make cap stones. It was a lot of cuts, 80+ I think, and ALOT of dust but it did it. Atthe point if deciding whether to use my then relatively new saw to potentially destroy it by cutting concrete, I figured the job was worth a lot more to me than the £150 it cost, so if it was knackered after I'd just buy a new one. After taking it apart, cleaning all the dust out and regreasing, the only thing that seemed to be any worse for wear was the adjuster cams, the dust just ground them away!

Apart from that the saw has been briiliant. I'd have loved a TS55, but even my man maths couldn't justify the cost for the odd cut that I do. One of the reasons I had the erbauer was its instand availability from screwfix, and I paid on my work account and gave my boss the so effectively had it -vat. That made it a ~£120 saw, which is brilliant value for money. The other reason was the compatibility with Makita rails, I've now got a a 3m and 1.5m rail which is great for cutting ply, although I may get a 1m to go with my Peter Millard portable bench (sorry Peter, I bought the plans for that and the tresses, and bought the cnc mft style top for it, I just havnt got round to building it yet! 😭).
 

JobandKnock

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I can't find any spares for it, at least not readily available, I may email screwfix and see what they say.
You might also want to try Solent Tools. They seem to do spares for quite a few "own brand" tools like Erbauer, Parkside, etc. Maybe worth a punt before you fire up the CNC

...185mm blade vs 160/165mm as ‘normal’ - but the blade size is a pain as neither manufacturer offer blades as spare parts, and the depth of cut if only +12mm or so.
You say that, Peter, but 184/185 (or 7-1/4in in old money) is a very common blade size and has been for decades, although admittedly often with 16mm bore, If you want an awkward blade size, try my Hilti WSC265 - 180 x 30mm in a saw that really won't take a 184mm blade
 

petermillard

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You might also want to try Solent Tools. They seem to do spares for quite a few "own brand" tools like Erbauer, Parkside, etc. Maybe worth a punt before you fire up the CNC

You say that, Peter, but 184/185 (or 7-1/4in in old money) is a very common blade size and has been for decades, although admittedly often with 16mm bore, If you want an awkward blade size, try my Hilti WSC265 - 180 x 30mm in a saw that really won't take a 184mm blade
Oh sure - but it’s the bore and the kerf that can catch you out, and frankly bizarre that neither manufacturer offers an oem blade. 🤷‍♂️ Great shout on Solent Tools btw - didn’t know about them, thanks! 🙌👍
 

h-magic

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What ever saw your getting make sure you can get a decent length rail for the machine and as other have said make sure you can get blades.
Stehle do a whole range of blades and there really good.
 

Yuri

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No, it doesn't. I can't see it makes a big difference, and it's about a third of the cost of the main brands. I might think differently if I were using it all day every day, I suppose.

hi phil , I have the evolution saw and track package , but find myself using a Parkside plunge saw over the evolution saw ,, so much less mess( sawdust) and easier to setup depth and even feels safer to use ,,,
 
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