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Track saw splinter strip

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artie

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My old, used and much abused Parkside track saw caught my eye in an idle moment the other day.

It had become so chewed up through misuse and carelessness that I had taken to indexing off the back of the track to gain some accuracy.

Off I went to Amazon and ordered some rubber strip and double sided tape.

Once they arrived it didn't take long to repair.

The rubber strip has helped with lining up the cuts, but the quality of the cut hasn't improved as much as I hoped. Luckily most of my joins are hidden.
 

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marcros

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did you stick it on so that the first cut using it cut the edge of the new strip?
 

DBT85

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Are you using the Parkside blade? I have a Freud in my titan and it gives great results.
 

marcros

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what are you cutting, 24 tooth sounds very low tooth count for sheet materials and cross cutting.
 

artie

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12mm plywood, that's what it cuts 99% of the the time.
As I said I don't need a flawless cut I renewed the rubber to aid with the accuracy, which is somewhat important.
Luckily I can hide almost all the cuts.

Just for interrest does that cut look about average for a 24 tooth blade?
 

marcros

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I get a good cut using my 48 tooth (standard) blade. No chip out and my rubber strip is due for replacement fairly soon.

I haven't used a 24 tooth so I cannot say for sure, but I wouldn't be surprised to see a cut like you have. it cannot be much else, you have replaced the strip which gives support, the cut isnt burnt which would suggest alignment issues (and not give the chipping). I would swap the blade out, just in case on your next use you cannot hide the cut.
 

Rorschach

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I also have the parkside saw, the supplied stock blade does pretty well for most things.

I run 3 blades. I use the stock blade for general purpose cuts where I want accuracy but not too concerned about finish. I have a Trend 48 tooth (I think, would have to check) fine cut blade that I use for accurate and high quality cuts, I rarely use it so it stays nice and sharp. I then have a stock of cheapo Titan blades I picked up for £1 each in a screwfix sale, they are undersize in diameter and tooth width so the cut isn't super accurate as it doesn't touch the splinter strip but they are ideal for breaking down large sheets into manageable sizes and I also use them for cutting nasty chipboard. Works well for my needs.
I also have a cheap evolution circular saw that I use for really rough work like fencing and outdoor jobs. I have a homemade track for that that I can use as well, but now I have the Parkside I never use it, keep it on hand just in case though.
 

artie

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I just keep one blade for all general purpose work, when it's too dull I bin it.

Another thing I did which made a very noticeable improvement, was to lubricate the track and underside of the saw with silicon spray.

Now it glides like a very glidey thing.
 

Inspector

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I would get the blade sharpened and see if the cut improves. Actually I would have the 24 tooth blade sharpened as a rip blade and get a new 48. The 24 for ripping lumber or hardwood and the 48 for sheet goods and crosscuts in lumber.

Pete
 

Dan Steely

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I've got a Parkside track saw too and with a good blade it's a great tool. In a perfect world I'd like a one piece 2.4m track. Does anyone know if the track profile matches another manufacturer?
 

DBT85

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If anyone knows its @petermillard but he also did a series of videos using it so I think it did work. I just use the Evolution 2800 pair, not as ideal as one rail but less than half the price if I recall. I did suggest to them to make a single 2800 rail.
 

Roseland 2

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Festool sell a 12-tooth blade for ripping solid wood, and a 48-tooth for cross cutting. Ply is, of course, a mix of ripping and cross-cutting, and they sell a 24-tooth blade for that. I have all three blades, and find the 48-tooth tends to burn ply, but the 24-tooth does not. I have never tried cutting ply with a 12-tooth.

Andrew
 

Rorschach

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I've got a Parkside track saw too and with a good blade it's a great tool. In a perfect world I'd like a one piece 2.4m track. Does anyone know if the track profile matches another manufacturer?
I run my Parkside mostly on a Festool track.
 

sammy.se

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I'm using a parkside with a Bosch 48T blade. Results are glue-ready.

I think @petermillard has tried some blades from a brand I can't recall, white and green coloured, printed all over the blade
 

sammy.se

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I really like the parkside, the major downsides are the fiddling it takes to get the short tracks connected straight, and staying straight when I move them for every cut. And that I find myself constantly checking the guide cams haven't slacked, and checking the saw is plunging square, every once in a while. I'm a hobbyist so I can 'afford' the extra time it takes, but I am contemplating buying longer Makita or festool tracks, but still using the Parkside saw. It cuts nicely, no toe issues and so it makes sense to me to have a more expensive track and a cheaper saw. Would I like a more expensive saw? Of course! I have access to a DeWalt plunge saw now and then and it is much better than the parkside. But at four times the cost...
 

petermillard

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Sorry, late to the thread, and thanks for the shout @sammy.se @DBT85 and @jvc26. All my tracksaw vids are in a playlist here:-
http://bit.ly/TracksawWorkshop - if anyone’s interested. I did some blade comparisons here and wasn’t overly impressed with the Trend. As others have said a 24t blade is a bit coarse for ply IME - I usually use 48t - and get a nice clean cut; scoring cut helps get a clean waste-side cut too.

Lots of good quality blades out there, I’ve been using the Key Blades & Fixings one for a while and it’s good; must get my old Festool ones sharpened though!
HTH P
 

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