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Tool identification

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rs6mra

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Hi,
This might be a long shot as its a photograph but I am trying to determine whether this is a dry or wet sharpening stone and what can it be best used for sharpening?........
There are no markings on it.

Thanks
 

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AndyT

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I might be wrong but that looks like an oil stone
I think you are right.

For the avoidance of doubt - when people talk about a "whetstone" the "whet" part of the word means sharp.

Coincidentally, almost all stones are used with something to wash away fine particles of abrasive and steel.

In the west this has generally been oil.
 

Woody2Shoes

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I think you are right.

For the avoidance of doubt - when people talk about a "whetstone" the "whet" part of the word means sharp.

Coincidentally, almost all stones are used with something to wash away fine particles of abrasive and steel.

In the west this has generally been oil.
Aha! as in whet ones appetite (although going back to that IPA thread from the other day, I'm not averse to wetting my appetite either...). I still don't really like the idea of putting water (the arch enemy) on tools (even if I then wipe it off).
 

novocaine

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Judging by the apprentice box id say its an oil stone. Reckon it was set in the box in the late 60s early seventies when making a box like that was part of the c&g (i think, in to many years young to have been around then, but have seen plenty like it over the years with old hands)

Use it with a light machine oil or 3 in 1.
 

Phil Pascoe

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Aha! as in whet ones appetite (although going back to that IPA thread from the other day, I'm not averse to wetting my appetite either...). I still don't really like the idea of putting water (the arch enemy) on tools (even if I then wipe it off).
So use IPA. It's excellent on really fine Washitas and Arks. (I've used water stones for nearly forty years and never had any problem with water on tools.)
 

Cabinetman

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I still use a stone very much like that in a box that’s a bit like that, I use Liberon honing oil, everyone has their own ideas but it’s what suits the individual really, and if you are getting good results stick with it. Ian
 

Bob1955

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First thing I would do is lap it flat, you just need a perfectly flat base like a granite tile or float glass, some 600 wet n dry and a strong arm, mark the stone with criss cross lines with a pencil and just rub adding water until there are no more lines left...you will have a nice flat stone to get better results.
 

Robbo60

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My Dad had a one just like that in a box with different Grit on either side. When he died I cleared his shed and thought "why would I ever need this" and threw it out. DOH! had to buy one 15 years later. I did keep his Record plane though. Think of him every time I use it. I use 3 in 1 oil also
 

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