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Tool cupboard/chest combi unit (with pics)(long)

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Ian Dalziel

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Sneak preview to my wall hung tool cupboard/chest coming out in GWW soon
Hung on a French cleat. Also might need to add a lower support the more tools I put in it.
The saws are mounted onto the back with the plane tray hinged at the top
Which is lifted by 2 gas struts (taken off a scrap hatchback car)


The planes are held on there toes and also an earth magnet positioned to stop any accidents, the weight balance for the struts is just about right. Slightly heavy in the down position but lighter the higher I lift. I have enough planes to fill it but they didn’t look good enough with the odd bit of rust here and there yuk

I didn’t want to actually drill into the doors to hang the chisels etc so I grooved the sides so I can slide in the hangers. The doors are 45 mitred together so I had a seamless transition between the sides and front. Also the first time I have used this type of hinge, they are easy to get very accurate via a home made jig and give a seamless side when closed
Alf is not the only one with a chisel problem


The lower drawers were done away from the cabinet as I hate having to open the unit every time I want something small it also aids locking the drawers with a lockable lift up front, handy for small picky hands (kids)I lined the drawers with stick on felt

I had a finishing problem with the door magnets, I put these on before I applied the finish and they streaked the laquer, they are of the type you drill a hole and they wedge in so they don’t come back out but hey it’s in a workshop.

The dovetails are done deliberately like this. I purposely used metal drawer glides so as I don’t get any binding as with wooden runners especially in a workshop environment. The wood is all AWO and the back and plane tray is oak faced mdf

Still got a few brass bits and pieces to fit but its now the talking point rather than the bench when people come and visit.


I hope this gives a few ideas to people wanting to make there own. This unit has a fair bit of time and effort in it but a worthwhile project none the less


Ian
 

Shady

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Fascinating Ian, and beautiful work: I've been contemplating plane storage for a while: the gas struts are a neat idea: I'll have to wait until one of the neighbours leaves his car out overnight.. :twisted:

You know you need that lower support with a french cleat - I use them for all my workshop wall mounted cabinets, and I'm sad enough that I hate the knowledge that they're ever so slightly not plumb vertical without one - I always plan it from the start point. (edit - and then aim to run electric cabling/conduit behind the cabinet - neater...)

Just one question: my reading of the post suggests that you did the dovetails that way because of something to do with the metal slides: can you clarify why you did them like this for me? Seems to me that they're not actually providing the mechanical resistance to pulling that is part of the rationale for a dovetail on a drawer.. I hesitate to question someone with your skills, and accept that modern glue and sensible use is unlikley to part the joint, but it got me interested..
 

Woodythepecker

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Ian, the readers of GWW are certainly in for a treat. What a work of art. When will the article be in Good Woodworking?

Regards

Woody
 

Ian Dalziel

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Shady,
The dovetails were done this way for show only. normally dovetails are hidden when the drawers are shut. dovetails were traditionally done so as the drawer front didnt part from the sides whilst pulling, but these were normally on wooden drawer runners which can expand and contract with different room conditions and make the drawers seem tight hence the need for the extra strength.
because i have fitted the unit in my workshp which also has varying atmospheric conditions i opted for ball bearing metal glide runners. these dont put any pressure on the actual pulling power (think snap on tool box)
of the drawers so this then allowed me to put them front facing to put them on show so to speak. with a good tight fit and modern glues they are fine.

thanks for asking

Ian
 

Shady

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Understood - thanks for the explanation: if I could produce work like that, I'd be showing my joints to best advantage too...
 

Chris Knight

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Ian,

It looks fantastic - a real Aladdin's cave too! I hope my standing tool cabinet looks as good when it is done..

I am interested in your comments on the Soss hinges - I wouldn't have thought these were strong enough for the application - but plainly they are. I am planning to use piano hinge the full length of my doors - or possibly three big butt hinges per door - if I can find nice brass ones. Your hinges are now making me think again.
 

Ian Dalziel

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Chris,
my internet has been dodgy bear with me if i cant get all answers replied.
first time ive used the soss hinges as well and it wont be the last they are incredibly strong, i used 4 per door but could have got away with 3, easiest hinges ive ever fitted.
I looked at piano hinge but i've found these notoriously difficult to get doors to align properly i've always found a min 0.5mm discepency no matter how hard i try. I have another tool cupboard with these on it and i just dont like them. butt hinges are also and option.

i quite fancy doing a toolbox on wheels...maybe have to look at that

this is the reason i've put up the pictures to raise a bit of interest in things that are not the norm so to speak.

finally going to blow the dust off the carving chisels and do a nice box for the 24 1/2 jointer.

well worth trying the soss hinges as they give a nice flush side without knowing they are there

Ian
 

Good Surname or what ?

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Ian,

Great work. I'm very envious and even more determined to make a tool cabinet myself.

Ian Dalziel":1h2taawd said:
The doors are 45 mitred together so I had a seamless transition between the sides and front.
:?:

Not sure I understand this. Maybe just me being thick. :oops:
 

Aragorn

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Excellent!! Fantastic!! A lovely job.
My only concern is that you may not have enough chisels... :roll: :wink:
 

Ian Dalziel

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Aragorn":25mjimwy said:
My only concern is that you may not have enough chisels... :roll: :wink:
oh no..... they were just the shiny ones, i probobly have another 100 or so but they are old ones and not so shiny;~ i told you alf wasnt the only one with a problem


good surname.
the front doors were made as normal rail and stile but slightly oversize...the sides were made with a tonge and groove then i ran a 45 mitre all round the sides then glued together. once i had the exact size i cut a 45 mitre all round door fronts this allowed them to sit in flush with the sides hence a seamless transition...hope that made sense if not youll see a drawing in GWW soon

Ian
 

Good Surname or what ?

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Ian,

Yep ! I was being thick 'cos I had to read your explanation 3 times before I got it. But I understand now and think I might copy your idea. 8)

I was thinking of making my doors as a frame and panel front, biscuit jointed to the sides (Seemed like a good excuse to buy a biscuit jointer !)
 

Drew

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A real nice looking tool chest Ian. I'm so unorganized that a place for everything really fascinates me (I always try for it and fail miserably)
It gives a good idea for something to try in the new workshop when I've got it finished.

Drew
 

Alf

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Ian Dalziel":3c7i8yai said:
Alf is not the only one with a chisel problem
This has been the only comfort as I've got greener and greener with jealousy with every progress report and picture via email... :mrgreen: It's been a real long haul, I know, but the result has certainly been worth all Ian's hard work. Proper job. =D>

Cheers, Alf
 

Steve Maskery

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Marvellous Ian, great piece of work.

The cupboards in my workshop are also hung on cleats. No problem for most, but a couple of years ago I did have an almightly crash just before Christmas, when one of my double cupboards gave way. It was the cleat. This cupboard was full of screws and nails and other bits of metal, with a few jigs and a radio on the top. The main damage (apart from the cabinet itself) was to my P/T on which it landed. The insurance coughed up for a new one, but it's not actually as good as my previous one. Heigh Ho.

I just suggest you keep your eye on those cleats, there's a lot of metal there.

Looking forward to the write-up.

Cheers
Steve
 

wizer

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Ian

I really like this tool cabinet. The struts are ingenious. My question is about security. Will you finish the cabinet with any kind of locking system? Or is this not an issue due to having good enough locks/security on the workshop itself. Looking at all those tools I can't help thinking it's a burgalar's dream
 

Ian Dalziel

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Steve Maskery":3c646hcr said:
Looking forward to the write-up.
Cheers
Steve
Glad someones looking forward to the write up i know i'm not it'll probobly take longer than the actual project. i'm only half way but confident i'll finish soon :roll:

Woody i'm not sure when it'll come out in GWW probobly within the next 2 issues. :)

Alf,
thanks for all your help and inspirations and apologies i didnt do the tambour front. :wink:

i will most definately put on an underside cleat to support it as i will probobly get more tools for it

Wizer,
I have 3 burgular alarms 2off mains wired with battery backup and 1 battery operated,9 intruder sensors, 6 cameras 4 inside and 2 outside and security lights around the perimeter. never had a problem yet but i dont tempt providence.
funny i only have one for the house. the workshop has full double glazing with locking windows and the door is a UPVC plastic job with a good locking system
 

Steve Maskery

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Ian Dalziel":3g6kr6g9 said:
Glad someones looking forward to the write up i know i'm not
Sympathies!

I try try to write up my stuff contemporaneously, almost day by day. I know it makes for a verbose account (and, strangely enough, the unusually large verbal output of my mouth has been commented on since childhood ( "Speech very good in quality, rather too much in quantity." - Mr CLarke, Beeches Junior School, circa 1969). But it's the only way I can remember the details of what I do, the particular challenges I meet, and the little problems I encounter and resolve. I write them all up (and Pete, bless his little cotton socks, cuts them all out to squeeze it into available space), but personally I think it makes the difference between a list of instructions and an interesting read.

I'm currently making a patio table, but it will probably be a bit late for this year, and I am having difficulty writing it up, simply because I had finished the underframe before I had put finger to keyboard.

Much easier to do it as a journal. I must keep telling myself...

Cheers
Steve
 

tx2man

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Lovely work Ian,

I'm glad i've already made a TC,( albeit 1% of the
quality of yours and 1% of the tools :lol: ) as that
would wipe out my tuit list for 6 months :!:

With my saws, i used the same handle templates to
hold them, but also, rotational duplicates fixed to them,
so the saws are locked in, as it were.
I must be a belt and braces man 8-[, especially as your
saws are better than mine!

TX
 

devonwoody

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Superb, I am lost for further words.




Wizer,
I have 3 burgular alarms 2off mains wired with battery backup and 1 battery operated,9 intruder sensors, 6 cameras 4 inside and 2 outside and security lights around the perimeter. never had a problem yet but i dont tempt providence.
funny i only have one for the house. the workshop has full double glazing with locking windows and the door is a UPVC plastic job with a good locking system


WHAT EVER YOU DO DON'T EMPLOY THE SECURITY SETUP USED BY THE ROYALS AT WINDSOR PALACE :oops:
 

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