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Tool chest challenge - chisels and gouges

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Alf

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Okay, you - well Aragorn - asked for it:


Click on the pic to take you to the album

Took me a lot longer than I'd anticipated, and I've made as little attempt as possible to get into the technicalities of what makes one chisel X and another Y. However, if anyone wants to embark on chisel nomenclature, feel free. I shall watch from afar. :wink:

Cheers, Alf
 

Alf

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Philly":3ku3ht7m said:
Hmm....Think you may have to pare that lot down a bit :roll:
That's the point of the exercise. What d'you think this is - some sort of thinly disguised gloat...? :p :wink:

Cheers, Alf
 

Aragorn

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Thanks Alf! :lol: :lol:
Whoa - you have too many chisels! :shock: How much space is left in the tool chest?
I'm gonna say: keep all the tanged bevel edged and firmer chisels and one or perhaps two of the paring chisels.
All the remainder can be collected into further various glamour poses and made into a calendar for 2006! :wink:
 

Philly

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Sorry-couldn't resist the "pare" pun...... :?
Alright....
The L-N's
Pigstickers
Some gouges

That should make some room! :wink:
Cheers
Philly :D
(who has just remembered what this post was about originally :roll: )
 

Midnight

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Woahhhh...

ummmmm.... <trying to avoid the obvious...

I've learned to my cost that non socket chisels don't cut it when it matters.. that any help...???
 

Derek Cohen (Perth Oz)

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Hmm....Think you may have to pare that lot down a bit ..... That's the point of the exercise.
So Alf, what are your favourites: for paring, morticing, dovetailing. If you had to take just a few to a desert island, which will be the few?

Regards from Perth

Derek
 

Alf

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So Alf, what are your favourites: for paring, morticing, dovetailing. If you had to take just a few to a desert island, which will be the few?
Hah. The $64,000 question! :lol: Well, erm, I think we can assume the L-Ns. Possibly to compliment them a very thin bevel edged and a wide firmer. On the other hand, for non-dovetailing, firmer chisels are more comfortable on the fingers so maybe I need to include more of them... Paring is a 'mare, but on the whole I'd happily forget the cranked neck variety - until the long thin type are too short, of course, when suddenly they'll be flavour of the month. Mortising, well the oval bolstered feel more natural to be honest. But then the larger sizes are all socketed, so really I need to firm up on sizes rather than types.

C'mon folks, a few more whys and wherefores needed here. :p

Cheers, Alf
 

Derek Cohen (Perth Oz)

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C'mon folks, a few more whys and wherefores needed here.
Let's see, for me paring is all about touch, so a light chisel feels right. Paring dovetails requires a chisel with narrow bevelled shoulders (to get into the angles). I have only seen pictures of the LNs, and my understanding is that they would fit this bill very well. So I'm surprised that you don't view them this way and want additional "thin bevel edged" chisels. I would have to use two sets of chisels to do the job of the LNs. These would likely be my Bergs (which are great paring and dovetial chisels) and my Witherbys (which are better allrounders with tough steel but are not narrow enough in the shoulders to use as well for dovetails). Link below:

http://www.wdynamic.com/galoots/4images/details.php?image_id=1163

Mortice chisels? What type suits you best? "The oval bolstered feel more natural" - but you obviously don't have enough of them to make up the necessary sizes! Time to go rust hunting!! :D I am still at the stage where I am playing with mortice chisels. I have a great number of them but still do 90% with a router. But I'm gaining confidence. In my limited experience the longer mortice chisels (such as the Witherby sash mortices and the long Ibbotsons or Wards I have chop more accurately than the shorter Japanese and Marples pigstickers. I love the feel of the Japanese but work better with longer chisels). What do you think?

A picture with examples: http://www.wdynamic.com/galoots/4images/details.php?image_id=1106

Regards from Perth

Derek
 

Alf

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Let's see, for me paring is all about touch, so a light chisel feels right. Paring dovetails requires a chisel with narrow bevelled shoulders (to get into the angles). I have only seen pictures of the LNs, and my understanding is that they would fit this bill very well. So I'm surprised that you don't view them this way and want additional "thin bevel edged" chisels.
Ah, a terminological confusion. I was thinking paring more as in the use of long thin paring chisels for cleaning housings or trimming plugs. The LNs are, indeed, fine for dovetails. Although having compared the bevel edges with my old chisels, they're quite different in style.

Mortice chisels? What type suits you best? "The oval bolstered feel more natural" - but you obviously don't have enough of them to make up the necessary sizes! Time to go rust hunting!! :D
It's dawning on me that I've made a terrible error of judgement. It's like an alcoholic thinking they're going to an AA meeting, but actually winding up at a tour of a brewery... :roll: :lol:

In my limited experience the longer mortice chisels (such as the Witherby sash mortices and the long Ibbotsons or Wards I have chop more accurately than the shorter Japanese and Marples pigstickers. I love the feel of the Japanese but work better with longer chisels). What do you think?
Hmm, while the longer length is a Good Thing in that it better demonstrates when you're not holding the chisel straight, on the other hand I find shorter is easier to actually hold upright in the first place. But then I haven't used the socket ones hardly at all yet. So maybe they'll do just fine for the larger sizes I don't use so much :wink:

They put the condition of my mortice chisels to shame. :oops:

Of course I've managed to forget all about the gouges now. Does anyone else even use gouges any more? :?

Cheers, Alf
 

Gill

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Alf":o9gcp06d said:
Of course I've managed to forget all about the gouges now. Does anyone else even use gouges any more?
Strangely enough, I'm looking out for a gouge. I've got some 'plans' for an oak roasting platter and I've been given a nice chunk of oak that'll just about serve the purpose. Paskins are holding their biennial show this weekend in Kidderminster, so I'll have a mooch round for one.

Oh, the thought of beef smoking itself on oak as it roasts - yummy!

Gill
 

Gill

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woodshavings":3hnd19xs said:
you place the oak platter in the oven ?:shock:
Yup.

Richard Blizzard published a book called "Wizard Woodwork" in 1985 (ISBN 0 563 21103 2) which has the project. Sadly, the book is now out of print, but I'm prepared to scan the appropriate pages and email them if anyone's interested.

The book says that this is how you prepare the platter for the oven:

  • The platter needs proving before you use it for cooking.

    1. Rub it with cooking oil or dripping and a sprinkling of herbs (even garlic if you're brave).

    2. Now put the platter in a cool oven (that should frighten a few woodworkers) and gently increase the heat to gas mark 6 or 400F, and leave it at this high temperature for about 30 minutes. Turn off the oven and let the platter cool inside. The platter is now ready for use.

    Inevitably there will be a few cracks but don't worry as these will stabilise as the cooking oils penetrate the wood. I should stress that it is vital that that the wood is well seasoned and, if possible, kiln dried.

I've been fascinated by this project for more than 20 years but never dared to try it. The time has come :) .

Gill
 

Midnight

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Sounds interesting Gill......

<keepin quiet cos if SWMBO hears about it.....guess who'll have another project on the list......
 

woodshavings

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Gill, that sounds very "interesting" ! Would really appreciate a copy of the critical bits from the article.

Is the platter made from a single piece of oak or can it be joined (biscuit maybe) I wonder what adhesive would be food safe and stand the temperature.

John
 

Gill

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Hi John

There should be a private message about this project from me waiting for you.

The platter is made from a single piece of timber, so no biscuits or glues would be involved.

Gill
 

bugbear

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Nice gloat on the Ward & Payne pig stickers. All my "best" (i.e. balanced, finished and edge retention chisels) are Either I. Sorby (Mr Punch logo) or (early) Ward & Payne.

BugBear
 

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