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Tips needed for ripping with the TS2500 table saw.

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Digizz

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Spent the day planing, thicknessing and cutting my Maple for the table I'm making - pretty good so far and have got the hang of the HMS260 :)

Crosscutting on the TS2500 is also fine but ripping is a different matter and not quite mastered that yet :( I'm using the fence set about 2" behind the front of the blade. Pushing steadily using a push block. I'm still getting the odd slightly burnt patch and the finish of cut, whilst accurate overall has a few teeth marks (slight grooves).

I guess I should watch some more of Norm!

Any pointers?

Oh, and anyone with a TS2500 and sliding table - is it possible to extend the fence attached to the sliding table when cutting mitres at 45deg so that the fence is close to the blade (i.e. within a few mm)? I can only get a few inches away which isn't much good for smaller pieces. and have to use the mitre attachment thingy (!) that runs in the T slot (whatever it's called ;) )

Ta.
 

Chris Knight

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You need to ensure the rip fence is parallel to the blade by careful measurement from a single tooth on the blade (mark it) at the front of the table, then rotated to the rear. I use a dial gauge for this to get within a couple of thou.

Some woods burn easily and maple is one of them, cherry is another.

Don't rely on your table saw to cut perfect mitres unless you make a suitable jig or spend ages fiddling with the mitre gauge, it gets you near but not perfect. I always clean up mitres on a shooting board, it is quick and easy. Clamp the wood to the mitre gauge when cutting - it has a tendency to shift along the fence otherwise - can also glue 220 grit sandpaper to the mitre-gauge fence.

Sawblades come in all kinds of qualities- a poor one will always mark the work, a moderate one will often mark the work and a very good one, will sometimes mark the work - it's mainly due to vibration in the blade that causes it to "wobble" from side to side. Thin kerf blades are often the worst. A combination blade is OK but not perfect for ripping and cross-cutting, For best results use dedicated rip or cross-cut blades for the appropriate cuts.
 

johnelliott

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What blade are you using, best ripping results will usually come from a blade specifically designed for it, ie not for crosscutting, and may 20 odd teeth on a 250 blade.
I used to cut loads of maple, cutting is all about getting the right blade for each operation.
John
 

Digizz

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Thanks guys,

I'm using the blade supplied with the saw - dunno who makes it, I guess Scheppach buy them in from someone else rather than make their own?

Good tip about getting the rip fence lined up with the blade though Chris :)
 
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Anonymous

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I bought a cmt cross cut and rip blade and use the stock blade for sheet material and have had good results . It is a good idea to check periodically all setting especially if you move the machine around a fair bit.
 

Aragorn

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Burning certainly implies that the fence is out of parallel with the blade or that the timber isn't being held tightly against the fence.
Using a dedicated ripping blade for ripping makes such a difference to the combo blades. Give it a go!
 

Digizz

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OK - i'll get one and try it - isn't it a real pain having to change it for every operation between ripping/crosscutting though?

Which blades are best - CMT / Freud etc ?

thanks.
 

Aragorn

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Not a real pain - I think it's worth it. I get all my ripping done, change the blade and do the crosscut (or whichever way round is appropriate). It takes me just under a minute to change the blade on my Kity 1619.
(Yes I've timed it - how sad!)
 

Digizz

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OK ta.

Who makes the best blades then - and what type should I get for ripping hard (mainly) and softwoods?
 

Digizz

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Looked at the Freud blades - a bit confusing though between the pro and industrial range. Any ides which blade will give the absolute best finish for ripping hardwoods?
 

Digizz

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Oh - and another question - would you expect to get a perfect rip fit for gluing up with no cleanup of the cut - or would you always expect to have to plane the edge either by hand or via the jointer?
 

Ian Dalziel

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Hi Digizz,
Blades are important as is fence alignment but you could also leave a mm or 2 and then surface plane it down to size, by doing this it gives an even finish along the whole length of the workpiece, if its left as a sawn face its possible to miss any slight blemish until you apply a finish,
I prefer to cut slightly oversize every time then surface it on the jointer

regards
Ian
 

Aragorn

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I have always got on well with Trend's rip blade.
I don't know how it pans out value-wise against the other options.
I always take a sawn edge to the surface planer before gluing up panels.
 
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Digizz

Completely agree with Chris's comments - especially the shooting board.

The Freud blade I use has 40 teeth and gives a finish as good a s planer on both ripping and crosscut.
Clearly with so many teeth the ripping is slower than a 'true' ripping blade' but the quality makes up for it
 

Digizz

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Thanks guys - learning a lot as I go :)

I took a very small nick out of the planer blades yesterday - has taken all day to re-grind them on the Tormek - So SLOOOOOOW :(

Must get a spare set and find someone to send them off to - wasted a whole day on the blooming things. Mind you, they are nice and shiny sharp now :)
 

Chris Knight

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Digizz,

Don't bother with a single nick (or two, so to speak.) Simply loosen the blades and shift one blade an eighth of an inch one way and the other blade an eighth of an inch the other way. Now one blade will clean up the results of the nick in the other blade.

You can do this for quite a while. Also look on your planer as a semi rough and ready device. A few swipes with a handplane or scraper are merited on the best machine planed boards and will easily get rid of the problems caused by a nick or two.

You must handplane and/or scrape a board you intend to put a gloss finish on otherwise the "scallops" of machine planing will always show up - unless you go crazy with the sander, then sanding marks will show up!
 

Digizz

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Sounds like good advice thanks.

I'm still not very good with the hand plane - it seems to be either no shaving or digs in (even with a tiny adjustment). I think one of the problems is the cap iron is poorly ground so shavings quickly wedge between it and the blade. (well that's an excuse I like - and I'm sticking with it! ;) )
 
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