Time for a new Drill & Impact driver....what's your thoughts?

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scooby

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For impact drivers, I can recommend Makita. I'm still using the same one I bought in 2006, it gets properly abused and has been dropped so many times. It just won't die.
Obviously, it makes sense to buy the same manufacturer for the drill. Since I switched to lithium in 2005-06, I've bought 3 Makitas (in 2005, 2010 and 2013). 2005 died after 5 years. Other 2 are still going fine with every day use. I did have to replace the forward/reverse lever on 2010 one the other day though.
 

angelboy

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gog64

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Wow, that Dewalt is expensive! That's more expensive than a Festool Quadrive. Maybe it's better, but I can't imagine how? The new & improved Quadrive TDC18 (replacement for the PDC, which is the one I have) is available to preorder for £279 inc VAT from FFX if you can wait a couple of weeks. That comes with a 5.2 airstream battery and a SYS3 Systainer (no charger). That's got to be a bit of a bargain as that's about the same price as the bare PDC that it replaces, so possibly a preorder deal.

With the 3 year service inclusive warranty that's actually really good, I know where I'd spend my money and it wouldn't be on the Dewalt at that price.

I have no idea how they've managed to improve the PDC? I thought it was pretty near perfect apart from the fact that it screams like a banshee when drilling masonry. Maybe they've made it quieter? ;)
 

clogs

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I have used Hitachi with great reliability but they are getting old now....(Lithium batts)
will def upgrade to Milwaukke when they die.....

just a note on drill chucks......My Hitachi will allow the drill to dop out of the chuck....
annoyingly for years...then I worked out that whe you release the truigger a brake stops the chuck almost dead.....
well it's the inertia that keep the chuck moving just enough to alow it to slacken......
if you release the trigger slowly it does not drop the drill......
it's just getting into the habbit of slowly realeasing the trigger.....
 

angelboy

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I can get a Dewalt DCF887 with two 5Ah batteries, charger and case & a Dewalt DCD996 also with two 5Ah batteries, charger and case for £10 more than I was getting the Makita 481 & 154 with two 5Ah batteries, charger and case.

Does this sound like the way to go?
 

LJM

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If you want to do all those things that the Aussie guys tested the machines on, possibly, yes. But there’s always subjectivity in these tests; ergonomically, for instance, I find the Makita best, yet they did not agree. Also not that the Dewalt is the heaviest and looks the biggest; perhaps that’s significant to you... perhaps not.

Also, it do you need 18v? Currently, I probably don’t. I have an SDS drill, so if I had a 12v system, which is lighter and so better suited to cabinetry etc, I’d be covered.
 

JoshD

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I love my Bosch (blue) 12v pair, drill and driver. They're compact and lightweight, and it's amazing how much that little bit less weight helps. No hammer function though, I have that on my 850w corded beast. I bought the driver that comes with right angle and offset attachments: the offset is more use than the right angle. it also gives the choice of traditional chuck or 1/4" hex holder. Switching to hex drill bits is great, for example you can extend the reach with standard bit holders----2 or 3 if you want; and you don't need to apply eyebulging force to tighten the chuck up and loosen it again. But you have to beware bits that aren't forged from one piece of of metal (they're called snappy for a reason) ...
 

BHwoodworking

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either milwaukee m12 stuff, or makita lxt stuff, and then maybie if you are doing hardcore stuff the makita xgt gear.
 

TheUnicorn

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have often thought it would be nice to have a 12v twin pack for weight and space, that said, i'm not sure that an impact driver is a great fit for woodwork, more of a construction tool? Interested to hear people's thoughts
 

JoshD

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have often thought it would be nice to have a 12v twin pack for weight and space, that said, i'm not sure that an impact driver is a great fit for woodwork, more of a construction tool? Interested to hear people's thoughts
Yes, bad habit to tighten up with it .... But I sometimes do! And sometimes regret it! Useful though for undoing, and (surprisingly) sometimes very handy with drill bits, especially auger bits, and especially auger bits with an aggressive pitch on the central threaded portion
 

LJM

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have often thought it would be nice to have a 12v twin pack for weight and space, that said, i'm not sure that an impact driver is a great fit for woodwork, more of a construction tool? Interested to hear people's thoughts

The newer Makita 12v impact driver (and, no doubt, others) are optimised for their intended niche; the impact kicks in progressively, as needed.
 

BHwoodworking

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i use my impact for big screws and site work, and then have an milwaukee m12 CD for the smaller screws. but that thing can show its teeth when dropped into gear 1. i have put in a 5x100 with it before.............
at the sametime, it can also be increadibly pricise, probably not cxs precises, but precise enough non the less
 

pe2dave

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Wanting 'good enough to last', I decided on Makita. Once the decision was made, I stuck with them,
shared batteries and charger. I've not regretted the decision.
 

DBT85

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have often thought it would be nice to have a 12v twin pack for weight and space, that said, i'm not sure that an impact driver is a great fit for woodwork, more of a construction tool? Interested to hear people's thoughts
No had an issue with the 12v impact on woodwork stuff. At the end of the day all its doing is screwing like normal until the torque required gets too high and then it effectively only turns maybe 1/4 turn at a time with each impact. The impact is rotational, not linear like a hammer drill.

So just like any other driver, don't keep going until the screw is sunk too far. They are loud though.

Incidentally @JoshD since you have the same as me, I purchased a couple of 3ah batteries on ebay for £28 and they work great. Sometimes buying 3rd party batteries can be a minefield but these actually are. Here's the link to the shop exmate2019 | eBay Stores

I've not had one apart yet to check who makes the cells, but it ran all day with no issue so they deffo aren't fake cells.
 

Spectric

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Yes there is a lot going for Makita, not yet convinced about the brushless models but only time will tell and for now I stick with their brushed models. I also like the Bosch products, especially the GSR 12V-15 FC Cordless Drill/Driver | Bosch Professional although for some reason only 12 volt but with various heads including one that is 90°. Dewalt quality seems to be variable, but used a lot on sites and the worst for ergonomics is the Festool, the quality of which does not leap out or could be ranked any better than Makita or Bosch.
 

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