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Thinnest stock for Domino?

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WoodYewToo

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What is the thinnest size MDF / plywood / solid wood that people are joining together (as 90 degree joints for cabinets etc)... using the smaller Festool Domino machine (DF 500)?

Many thanks.
 

DBT85

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Same as Robin, you do have to be aware that if you use too much glue it can seep between plys or just blow the mdf apart if you are whacking it home.

The 4mm domino can also only plunge 10mm I think. It might be less.
 

Distinterior

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I’ve done 12mm easily.
Yes, agreed...! 4mm x 20mm Domino.
In reality, the 20mm length is actually only 18mm and if you plunge 10mm into each edge/face of your joint, knock the Domino into the end grain, then you will only have about 8mm to go into the opposing mortice.....less likelihood of glue blowout that way I've found.
 
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DBT85

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Ha. Enjoy. I seemed to get a little flack for buying one because I'm not using it to generate my fortune and I should just take longer to do things and be happy with it even if my time is valuable to me.

I did manage to get mine with a free systainer of all the sizes of domino and bits, not sure if that offer is still around though. Mine took about 8 weeks to materialise because of the shortages, from Bunnies Bolts.
 

LBCarpentry

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Domino 500 is the best of the two dominos IMO. Gets used loads more in my shop. Absolute game changer of a tool.

The XL actually gets used for cutting in deadlocks, sashlocks and trickle vents these days!
 

Spectric

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Domino 500 is the best of the two dominos IMO.
That is ok if you are only doing lighter work and can accept the 28mm plunge depth compared to the 70mm plunge of the 700, I use a Senaca adaptor that gives me a 6mm domino if I really have to go that small but I try and not go below 8mm if I can. With 12mm material I also use these Lock Mitre Bits - Infinity Tools
 

RobinBHM

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Thanks, chaps.
Domino DF500 incoming!
An amazing tool, it has stops that mean no pencil marks for many set ups.

The ability to make the slot either exactly the domino width or wider, creating lots of options.

And the fit is nice and snug
 

adidat

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That is ok if you are only doing lighter work and can accept the 28mm plunge depth compared to the 70mm plunge of the 700, I use a Senaca adaptor that gives me a 6mm domino if I really have to go that small but I try and not go below 8mm if I can. With 12mm material I also use these Lock Mitre Bits - Infinity Tools
made several exterior doors with my 700, 10 years on there still perfect. both dominoes are fantastic!

adidat
 

Spectric

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The DF500 is great but working out how to use the damn thing always makes my head ache!
Same with the 700, a great idea in principle but they could have taken it to another level by now if they gave us a better means of location rather than just having pins or a line. I have the Domino alignment jig which really helps get a line of non sloppy holes in the right place but really any tool should deliver out of the box. You don't buy a car and get told the tyres are extra and we do get this issue with a lot of woodworking tools where they need to be fettled to get the best out of them, another example is my P/T where I had to fit aftermarket blade holders to get a precise setup.
 

recipio

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The Domino is a great tool for furniture making. However, you are limited by having to clamp the parts together. For large wardrobes or any kind of built in unit I think the Lamello Zeta is a better choice. Lots of K/D fittings although they are a bit pricy . Easier to dismantle as well. As usual in woodworking we need both ! :sneaky:
 
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Spectric

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They do a connector system for the 700, no clamping required but much more expensive when compared to a beech domino. The 700 system is according to a @petermillard video or thread better than the 500 system, cannot remember why though. I can see that for some people having flat pack furniture is the only way of getting it into their property but given the choice I think I would stick with a woodworking joint even if it is a beech domino and these connector systems are making woodworking more like mecano .
 

DBT85

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The Domino is a great tool for furniture making. However, you are limited by having to clamp the parts together. For large wardrobes or anything kind of built in unit I think the Lamello Zeta is a better choice. Lots of K/D fittings although they are a bit pricy . Easier to dismantle as well. As usual in woodworking we need both ! :sneaky:
In a world where you can justify both then yeah I guess you'd use the Zeta over the Domino in those instances, especially as the fixings that are hidden will be perfectly suitable in most cases so there are no visible holes to cover and also not needing clamps or screws to pull things tight.
 

recipio

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In a world where you can justify both then yeah I guess you'd use the Zeta over the Domino in those instances, especially as the fixings that are hidden will be perfectly suitable in most cases so there are no visible holes to cover and also not needing clamps or screws to pull things tight.
The Lamello Clamex leaves a tiny hole for the cam lock so is quite acceptable. You can of course buy cheap Ikea type fixings but they are a pain to use. I'm now saving for the ridiculously overpriced Zeta but I just shelled out that price for a car service ( + 4 new tires ) so I don't feel too guilty :rolleyes:
 

Spectric

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Nothing is really too expensive if it is capital expenditure for a business and can repay cost over time, it is also not really expensive when you think what a woman can pay for clothes, shoes and bags that deliver a functionality that can easily be matched in quality by a lower cost item just not with a rip off "designer" label. The reason these niche tools are expensive is that they are niche and there is no competition so captive audience and that was the manufacturers intention, you want one then pay up.
 

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