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Thicknesser advice

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Will3344

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Hi guys

Looking for some more advice, I've got the Triton TPT125 it's pretty much brand new and until the other day only been used on soft woods so the blade's are nice and
sharp. I've bee milling up some American white oak for a project and on some parts of the material I get this pitting (see attached photo).

I've tried it on both sides of the wood going with the grains and I'm only taking quarter turns at a time.

I'm wondering if it's just the wood its self any advice would be helpful I've got another 8m to mill so would like to avoid it if possible .

IMG_20191020_132511.jpg
 

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Will3344

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Yeah I thought it was tear-out as well so ran I through on both directions on a scrap bit just to see and still get it. Obviously one side was worse than the other but on the side where is going with the grain it's still had some small patches hope that makes sense lol
 

Trevanion

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Will3344":2ugvui3r said:
Yeah I thought it was tear-out as well so ran I through on both directions on a scrap bit just to see and still get it. Obviously one side was worse than the other but on the side where is going with the grain it's still had some small patches hope that makes sense lol
That is possibly what was left behind from the original pass, If that's not the case you might have a piece with interlocking grain which is rare in oak but not unheard of. There are ways of dealing with interlocking grain but it involves messing with the geometry of the cutters which might be a bit beyond a hobbyist.

Something to try is to perhaps take off more than you'd normally think you would feeding it the way that had the least amount of tearing, it seems counter-intuitive but it can result in a cleaner finish.
 

Fitzroy

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I see that in oak quite often where the piece has grain direction change along its length. You end up with patches going against the grain whichever way you feed it. Only solution I’ve found is sharper blades and a thinner cut.

Fitz.
 

sunnybob

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I found that i had this problem if the extraction was not working at full strength. The chips dont clear the cutter fast enough and get forced back into the wood.
 

RogerS

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Fitzroy":2g6af7vb said:
I see that in oak quite often where the piece has grain direction change along its length. You end up with patches going against the grain whichever way you feed it. Only solution I’ve found is sharper blades and a thinner cut.

Fitz.
Or a drum sander ! Slow but it gets there in the end.
 

GrahamF

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I'm getting exactly the same problem with some spalted beech I was machining this morning. Some areas mainly only on one side rather than the whole piece, doesn't matter which way I run it or, blade setting. Interesting that the problem areas have higher moisture content.

I would also like a drum sander and have just been talking to Axminster about a new line they're bringing in, in about 4 weeks, nearly £500 cheaper than Jet. The "evaluation" one has been sold off on ebay and the new ones will have changes to spec. Will be interesting to read reviews when they're out and about.
 

Will3344

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ill have to keep an eye out for that drum sander, thanks guys I'm back at he real job for a few days so ill try out doing the other bits when off ill keep you guys informed
 

Deadeye

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My tuppence is that (in my short woodworking experience) I suffered quite a bit of tear.
Damp wood is a shocker, no matter how soft. So make sure it's really dry.
Grain often seems to change direction around knots, so when you're marking out, try to get pieces that have one direction and plane with the grain.
Making very fine cuts as you near the final thickness helps a little.
As I say, just my (limited) experience. If I had to pick one thing, make sure your wood is dry and your blades sharp
 

RogerS

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Trevanion has also made a very good point re altering /regrinding the knives. But as he rightly says may not be for someone new to the hobby/work/interest.
 

Just4Fun

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I had similar results with some birch in which the grain changed direction. I reverted to hand tools, which are more in my comfort zone.
 

Inspector

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My advice will go against those saying dry. I take a rag wetting it in hot water and wring it out. Rub the wood in the tear out area a touch and take a light pass. The warm water softens the wood and it cuts cleaner/smoother. It works best with sharp blades.

Pete
 

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