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Sawyer

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Tom K":1agcjlmv said:
Thats a museum piece why does it have a drill stuck on it?
The first morticers were un-powered, with a solid chisel. I think the mortice was done from a set of pre-drilled holes before being bashed out with the chisel machine. This may explain the hefty counterweight and massive lever. Others were foot-powered. Hard and slow work, I should think, hence the modification of the power drill.

For those interested in such things, here's a good US website: http://vintagemachinery.org/home.aspx

£90 starting bid? Come on everybody, form an orderly queue! :mrgreen:
 

kirkpoore1

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That's a friggin' crime. The price isn't bad, but I'd cut off the hand drill and leave it lying on his floor as I drove away with the rest.

I seriously doubt that was a solid chisel mortiser to begin with. Those were almost always foot, not arm, powered so you could get a more powerful stomp on them. Also, that's a pretty massive casting for the solid chisel mortiser era. Once chain mortisers and hollow chisel mortisers came out, they displaced the solid chisel ones pretty quickly (for obvious reasons). This probably had another head on it back in the day.

Kirk
 

kirkpoore1

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Tom K":28x21odh said:
Thats a museum piece why does it have a drill stuck on it?



Tom:
I can't see enough in this picture to make it out, but powered solid chisel mortisers often had a drill attached to them to drill out the initial waste and then use the solid chisel to square up the hole. Looks like a cool old machine, though.

Kirk
 

tool613

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kirkpoore1":1p74gppy said:
That's a friggin' crime. The price isn't bad, but I'd cut off the hand drill and leave it lying on his floor as I drove away with the rest.

I seriously doubt that was a solid chisel mortiser to begin with. Those were almost always foot, not arm, powered so you could get a more powerful stomp on them. Also, that's a pretty massive casting for the solid chisel mortiser era. Once chain mortisers and hollow chisel mortisers came out, they displaced the solid chisel ones pretty quickly (for obvious reasons). This probably had another head on it back in the day.

Kirk

Oh Kirk so much to learn :lol:

sure looks like this one




jack
 

tool613

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you used to be able to buy kits turn of the last century


there were powered thump and bump solid chisels mortiser.



and one of the most famous said to be the inventor of the solid chisel mortiser for ship block.


jack
 

kirkpoore1

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Well, it looks like you're right, Jack, though if you check the second ebay link the pic shows a much heavier cast base. Still, hand driven? They must have been working every guy in the plant in 15 minute shifts on that machine before going back to their regular jobs, unable to lift their right arms.:)

Here's a conversion that's in the same spirit, but much better done:


This is (or rather, started out as) a Yerkes & Finan power-driven solid chisel mortiser. It was originally flat belt driven, with a crank at the top of the column driving a solid chisel. A century or so after it was built, it aquired the little side growth you see, the head of modern table top mortiser. Stepping on the pedal raises the table, pushing the work into the mortising chisel. IIRC, the mortiser motor is attached to the spot where the original drill was mounted.

Kirk
 

tool613

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Yes i would say that is a much better conversion. is that an american?

The English however did there drilling on othere machines and then place them in the mortiser.
http://www.builderbill-diy-help.com/bru ... tiser.html
Prior to 1805 all mortises used hand power to cut the slots.
it could be one of theses



I think this is where the modern power English mortiser sprang from.
All the chain and hollow chisel did was make them lighter machines.
You really should try the hand lever Kirk it so much better than the footpower .I think the reason they made the american foot powered so heavy was so they did not tip over when you jumped up and down on the peddle :lol:


jack
 

Sawyer

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kirkpoore1":287nx517 said:
Those were almost always foot, not arm, powered so you could get a more powerful stomp on them.
Kirk
Stateside, yes, as perusal of the Vintage Machinery website seems to suggest. This side of the pond though, there were arm powered ones.

Thanks for all the posts and pictures - this is turning into a really interesting thread.
 
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