• We invite you to join UKWorkshop.
    Members can turn off viewing Ads!

The Precision Sander

UKworkshop.co.uk

Help Support UKworkshop.co.uk:

woodbloke66

Established Member
Joined
17 Sep 2018
Messages
1,126
Reaction score
10
Location
Salisbury
This is a little sander I usually make from time to time when I need to sand where other bits of sandpaper won't go: the 'Precision Sander'. Essentially is a block of wood with a bit of sandpaper stuck to it in such a way that it's very, very accurate in use.

The current job uses a number of exposed and wedged mortice and tenons that need to be tarted up:

IMG_4326.jpg


The top has been planed flat with a block and the corners are now rounded over with a very sharp Japanese paring chisel:

IMG_4329.jpg


The problem now is that I need to smooth out the chisel marks which is where the Precision Sander comes in handy. To make one, take a block of hardwood and shoot the sides square; then stick on a piece of double sided tape, then turn it over and trim off the excess dead flush with the block:

IMG_4334.jpg


IMG_4335.jpg


IMG_4336.jpg


...and then stick it to your sandpaper of choice. Here I'm making a double sided sander using 240g:

IMG_4337.jpg


Now the PS can get right into the corners to smooth out the contour of the joint:

IMG_4338.jpg


After a few minutes of sanding, the joint has been smoothed off but there remain behind some tell tale sanding marks on the leg:

IMG_4339.jpg


These can be easily sanded out using the Precision Sander as it will sand right into an otherwise inaccessible corner. The sandpaper lasts no time at all and after a short time it's pretty useless, but quick enough to make another sander...or use the other side.

IMG_4340.jpg


The finished joint:

IMG_4342.jpg


These take next to no time to make and are invaluable for going places that no sander has gone before. Live long and prosper :lol: - Rob
 

Attachments

D_W

Established Member
Joined
24 Aug 2015
Messages
7,266
Reaction score
1,029
Location
PA, US
Curious as to why this joint with facets wouldn't be more pleasing to the eye?

Not picking, I recognize that my taste for hand finished less sandpaper is often not the norm, and I've seen it in spades on guitars where I've ventured in the last two years. Even the factories will have a very skillful crisp planed and chiseled scalloped brace (perfect to my eye) and insist that sanding the crispness right off of it (no sonic difference, and this is on the inside of the guitar) is needed for final finish.

There are times that I must sand certain things, too, and will rely on devices like this (small pieces, etc), especially for fret leveling, etc. No commercial stuff needed, just properly applied sandpaper, a straight edge to check and a piece of planed wood that's jointed dead flat. Works a treat.

I have found that the PSA rolls (which are probably intended for machines) are far more durable and very reliable in sticking to purpose made shapes for sanding. they don't shed their grit immediately, and if they are good quality (european, scandinavian or american), they are very even in grit.
 

That would work

Established Member
Joined
29 Dec 2018
Messages
604
Reaction score
18
Location
Dartford
Sanding sticks are handy things.
I make a variety of them by contact adhesive sticking abrasive to all sorts of sections... flat, round, half round, boards. ... endless possibilities.
 

D_W

Established Member
Joined
24 Aug 2015
Messages
7,266
Reaction score
1,029
Location
PA, US
woodbloke66":3vpriok0 said:
D_W":3vpriok0 said:
Curious as to why this joint with facets wouldn't be more pleasing to the eye?
Simple answer; 'cos I like them rounded off - Rob
good enough answer for me!
 

MikeG.

Established Member
Joined
24 Aug 2008
Messages
10,158
Reaction score
663
Location
Essex/ Suffolk border
How come your paring left marks? ;)

I use a file if I can, and I am sure I would in those circumstances. But if there isn't one that works just right, I'm sure we've all stuck sandpaper to a suitable bit of wood. They are nice, Rob, your little signature wedged through-tenons. There's probably an off cut or two of bog oak kicking around here which should keep you ticking over with this detail for a year or three, if you ever happen to be down this way. ;)
 

xy mosian

Established Member
Joined
21 Feb 2009
Messages
2,862
Reaction score
24
Location
West Yorkshire
Silly question here. Can the tenon, protruding end, be shaped before making up the joint? That way it is only the wedges which need shaping.
xy
 

woodbloke66

Established Member
Joined
17 Sep 2018
Messages
1,126
Reaction score
10
Location
Salisbury
MikeG.":2dkf19tg said:
How come your paring left marks? ;)

I use a file if I can, and I am sure I would in those circumstances. But if there isn't one that works just right, I'm sure we've all stuck sandpaper to a suitable bit of wood. They are nice, Rob, your little signature wedged through-tenons. There's probably an off cut or two of bog oak kicking around here which should keep you ticking over with this detail for a year or three, if you ever happen to be down this way. ;)
Indeed Mike; the paring is a series of 'flats' left from the chisel which need to be rounded to a smooth profile and agreed, a fine file would do the same job. Again yes, everyone's stuck a bit of sandpaper to a block of wood, but here what I've done here is to ensure that the edge is dead square exactly where the sandpaper finishes so that you can get right into a corner.

I'm definitely up for a chunk of your Bog Oak and I certainly will be down your Suffolk way in September, as per our conversation a while ago on WH2, in fact SWIMBO will shortly be looking for accommodation for the night of the event.

xy mosian":2dkf19tg said:
Silly question here. Can the tenon, protruding end, be shaped before making up the joint? That way it is only the wedges which need shaping.
xy
It could, but I'd still need to bang in the wedges which would then need to be profiled - Rob
 

D_W

Established Member
Joined
24 Aug 2015
Messages
7,266
Reaction score
1,029
Location
PA, US
missed the low-life expectancy of the sandpaper comment in your first post. try the PSA roll in a light or medium weight. You can stick it right to the stick, then flip it over and cut it off flush with the stick face. It probably lasts at least 5 times as long as regular paper as long as it's decent quality.

Actually, for the price, it's almost highway robbery that the paper backed stuff intended for manual sanding doesn't last a tiny fraction as long as the non-stearated machine rolls.

Mirka gold would be at the high end of the market, but an eastern-euro roll branded porter cable usually sells here in the states for about 1/2 of mirka and life expectancy is about as good.

PSA paper and disc sold at harbor freight here (cheap import stuff) last only barely more than typical manual sand paper.

I use this stuff a lot for tools because it holds up well to hand lapping, etc, but only chanced upon how well it works (without being totally clogged up on the surface like stearated paper from the start) turning chess pieces a few months ago.
 

xy mosian

Established Member
Joined
21 Feb 2009
Messages
2,862
Reaction score
24
Location
West Yorkshire
woodbloke66":1zcchjt3 said:
xy mosian":1zcchjt3 said:
Silly question here. Can the tenon, protruding end, be shaped before making up the joint? That way it is only the wedges which need shaping.
xy
It could, but I'd still need to bang in the wedges which would then need to be profiled - Rob
Fair enough.
xy
 

Phil Pascoe

Established Member
UKW Supporter
Joined
29 Jan 2012
Messages
21,208
Reaction score
1,569
Location
Shaft City, Mid Cornish Desert
woodbloke66":vum49yej said:
... Again yes, everyone's stuck a bit of sandpaper to a block of wood, but here what I've done here is to ensure that the edge is dead square exactly where the sandpaper finishes so that you can get right into a corner ...
I made several some years ago with pieces of scrap architrave and other mouldings and different grades of w&d for cleaning up silver jewellery - I found it much better to have them very slightly under right angles. The leading edge gets right into the corners better.
 
Top