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That Amsterdam door paint

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Droogs

Is that chisel shar ... Ow
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Naw aeh dinnae ken. could you give a bit more context
 

houtslager

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nope its Grachten groen = which is a dark british reacing green with a pinch of black. Older painters used oil paint with a touch of turps and a really good brush. A dark grey primer, then lak plamuur = paint with filler and a colourant to suit top coat, then 2 coats of gloss.
Todays regs has banned oil paints for professionals :rolleyes: but Diy'ers can still buy and use it.
Modern paints acrylic or polyurethenes are ok but they can't match the old gloss enamel paints
hth, K
 

Jacob

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nope its Grachten groen = which is a dark british reacing green with a pinch of black. Older painters used oil paint with a touch of turps and a really good brush. A dark grey primer, then lak plamuur = paint with filler and a colourant to suit top coat, then 2 coats of gloss.
Todays regs has banned oil paints for professionals :rolleyes: but Diy'ers can still buy and use it.
Modern paints acrylic or polyurethenes are ok but they can't match the old gloss enamel paints
hth, K
It's not oil paints which get banned it's solvent based oil paints with high VOCs. Hence increasing use of trad linseed oil paints, particularly Sweden where it never went away.
 

houtslager

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True Jacob, the main reason oil based paints are banned for profesionals [in NL ] is the fact that painters suffered from very early dementia through constant exposure to the "poot" or in English the evaporating VOC , mainly synthetic turpentine oils, sikatifs [ hardeners] and thinners but one can still buy oil paint in the DIY sheds :unsure::rolleyes:
Still trying to find a decent high gloss finish that's water based. Luckily I found a business in France that sells 2 pack celulose in small [ 5L ] tins :cool: and for a reasonable price.
Karl
 

Jacob

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True Jacob, the main reason oil based paints are banned for profesionals [in NL ] is the fact that painters suffered from very early dementia through constant exposure to the "poot" or in English the evaporating VOC , mainly synthetic turpentine oils, sikatifs [ hardeners] and thinners but one can still buy oil paint in the DIY sheds :unsure::rolleyes:
....
Yes I know about the VOCs.
Traditional linseed oil is the safe alternative VOC free. Why Allback?
Have been using it fo 10 years or so and it does what is says on the tin.
It's very different in use compared to modern paints.
Expensive per tin but has very good coverage, long shelf life, no need for thinners, easy to apply once you've got used to it.
 

houtslager

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Yes I know about the VOCs.
Traditional linseed oil is the safe alternative VOC free. Why Allback?
Have been using it fo 10 years or so and it does what is says on the tin.
It's very different in use compared to modern paints.
Expensive per tin but has very good coverage, long shelf life, no need for thinners, easy to apply once you've got used to it.
yes I know of them, but never used them, do they make a high gloss outta interest?

K
 

Jacob

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yes I know of them, but never used them, do they make a high gloss outta interest?

K
No they are all dull colours and low gloss merging on matt finish. But they do stick like s**t to a blanket! Even seems to hold down old gloss which had started to peel, and does metal work fine with no primer.
 

Renoman

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True Jacob, the main reason oil based paints are banned for profesionals [in NL ] is the fact that painters suffered from very early dementia through constant exposure to the "poot" or in English the evaporating VOC , mainly synthetic turpentine oils, sikatifs [ hardeners] and thinners but one can still buy oil paint in the DIY sheds :unsure::rolleyes:
Still trying to find a decent high gloss finish that's water based. Luckily I found a business in France that sells 2 pack celulose in small [ 5L ] tins :cool: and for a reasonable price.
Karl
Can you post the details of the business inFrance please?
 

Mike.R

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As used on 10 downing streets shiny door also.
I've often wondered about the door at number 10. I can imagine that once upon a time it would have been hand painted and the men who did it would have been incredibly proud to be able to say they had painted one of the most famous doors in the world.

I can't help feeling that these days the door at number 10 will be a steel/composite construction, designed to withstand bomb blasts and bullets and the paint finish will most likely be sprayed on.

Does anybody know for sure ?
 

Jacob

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I've often wondered about the door at number 10. I can imagine that once upon a time it would have been hand painted and the men who did it would have been incredibly proud to be able to say they had painted one of the most famous doors in the world.

I can't help feeling that these days the door at number 10 will be a steel/composite construction, designed to withstand bomb blasts and bullets and the paint finish will most likely be sprayed on.

Does anybody know for sure ?
Wouldn't be surprised.
But high spec public buildings , shop fronts etc were all also high maintenance. They didn't have magic formulas they had large workforces at it through the year. Similarly with wooden ships - continuous maintenance with skilled craftsmen on board. If shipwrecked they could just about build a new ship if they were near a wood!
 

Gordon Tarling

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I recall reading what Phil said - there are two doors which are interchanged as necessary. I also read that they are made of steel and that the black gloss finish is sprayed in the workshop. Wish I could remember where it was that I read it!

G.
 

PhilipL

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Wikipedia:

Number 10's door is the product of the renovations Charles Townshend ordered in 1766; it was probably not completed until 1772. Executed in the Georgian style by the architect Kenton Couse, it is unassuming and narrow, consisting of a single white stone step leading to a modest brick front. The small, six-panelled door, originally made of black oak, is surrounded by cream-coloured casing and adorned with a semicircular fanlight window. Painted in white, between the top and middle sets of panels, is the number "10". The zero of the number "10" is painted in a very eccentric style, in a 37° angle anticlockwise. One theory is that this is in fact a capital 'O' as found in the Roman's Trajan alphabet that was used by the Ministry of Works at the time.[77][83] A black iron knocker in the shape of a lion's head is between the two middle panels; below the knocker is a brass letter box with the inscription "First Lord of the Treasury". The doorbell is inscribed with "PUSH" although is rarely used in practice. A black ironwork fence with spiked newel posts runs along the front of the house and up each side of the step to the door. The fence rises above the step into a double-swirled archway, supporting an iron gas lamp surmounted by a crown.[84] (See The Entrance Door c1930: As seen from the outside)[85][86]




The front door of 10 Downing Street, showing the letter-box inscribed with "First Lord of the Treasury"

After the IRA mortar attack in 1991, the original black oak door was replaced by a blast-proof steel one. Regularly removed for refurbishment and replaced with a replica, it is so heavy that it takes eight men to lift it. The brass letterbox still bears the legend "First Lord of the Treasury". The original door was put on display in the Churchill Museum at the Cabinet War Rooms.

The door cannot be opened from the outside; there is always someone inside to unlock the door.[87][88][89]
 
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