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Tenons with the router

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JFC

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Im making a couple of oak doors as a fill in job and having seen on here a lot of you do your tenons with the router so i thought id give it a go . Ive cut the cheeks on the tenons first to stop any breakout and have put a planer cutter in the router on my Record R PMS-R router table . I found it quite a lot of work and had to do alot of passes first at half thickness then full thickness. I thought about cutting more grooves into the tenon on the cross cut saw first to ease the work of the router, then i thought ill get on with the mortices and ask the experts on the forum :lol:
Also i always seem to have trouble with chipping when i am moulding the ovolo and rebates no matter what timber i am using , i've found marking the timber with a marking gauge stops or at least reduces it on most timbers but AWO seems to chip no matter what . Any tips ?
 

JFC

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Im back on the oak doors tomorrow and i've got to scribe the ovolo mould into the styles to make the tenon fit flush , i normally mark off the start of the ovolo cut at 45* and use a carving chisel to get the same shape . Anyone got any tips or a better way to do this as i don't think this is the best way .
 

tim

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Either mitre both corners so that the pattern joins or, much easier and quicker get a matched cutter set and run the rails and stiles along the inverted cutter using a spelch block on the end grain.

Cheers

Tim
 

JFC

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Its only an ovolo mould so a concaved cutter would do that i think , any ideas for a jig to hold the router level or would you do it on the router table ?
 

tim

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I'd definitely do it with a router table - depending on the size of doors you are talking about. If they are huge, then I'd use the router free hand.

Cheers

Tim
 

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I think Tim came up with the same idea I had but I was busy making you a picture. Here it is.


If you haven't cut the profile yet, you might be able to find a matched set of router bits to profile the ends with.
 

JFC

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There a standard size door ( ish) think ill try it on a scrap piece first rather than risk all the work i've done already on them .
Thanks for the tip , i've not been on this forum long and im trying and finding better ways to do things every day :D
 

JFC

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Ive tried the mitre way before and although the finish is nice i found it hard to mark out the 45* on the ovolo , its ok for the styles that are 100mm wide but the bottom and mid rails wont fit under my radial arm saw so need to be done by hand . Ive been looking for a jig or saw guide that will help me with this but cant seem to find one .
 

JFC

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Scott thanks for the link its inspired me to make my own jig that will slot over the 45mm PAR with an internal mitre cut to guide a fine saw . Now why didn't i make one of these years ago :roll:
 

j

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Dave,

Nice diagram, Makes things very clear.
Which program did you use to make that?


Thanks
J
 

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J, thank you. The program is called SketchUp. It was developed as an Architectural sketching program and isn't technically CAD. I find it very useful for doing shop drawings and making illustrations such as this one.
 
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