Quantcast

Tenon & mortis

UKworkshop.co.uk

Help Support UKworkshop.co.uk:

A parkin

Member
Joined
1 May 2019
Messages
8
Reaction score
0
Location
SOUTHAMPTON
The mortis i get i can use a routor but what the best way to do a tenon

Hi sorry im tony im a week end wood worker just getting into wood work and i can not buy a dabo to cut a tenon. Bloody uk
My response to that is ... H&S should be got rid off and we can eradicate stupidity from the jean pool
 

galleywood

Established Member
Joined
24 Feb 2015
Messages
351
Reaction score
0
Location
Chelmsford
What size is your work piece?
Use a hand saw.
You could use a router by hand or in a router table.
 

Sgian Dubh

Established Member
Joined
12 Oct 2004
Messages
2,176
Reaction score
65
Location
UK
Saw. Tenon saw, bandsaw, table saw, for example. You could even set up a router with a jig.

I'm not sure I share your negative assessment of the HSE. There are plenty of people out there whose 'jeans' (sic) might not get passed on to future generations if it wasn't for the work of the HSE. On the other hand, maybe unrestricted use of all equipment with potential to cause harm wouldn't be such a bad thing. There are, for instance, excellent reasons for restricted use of 'dabos' (sic) on saws as suggested by bodies like the HSE. Complete freedom to act stupidly may go some way to preventing the idiots passing on their low level jeans (sic) to even stupider future idiots.

I do wonder though if perhaps your negative swipe at the HSE was essentially meant to be humorous and tongue-in-cheek? Slainte.
 

A parkin

Member
Joined
1 May 2019
Messages
8
Reaction score
0
Location
SOUTHAMPTON
galleywood":gnix8bg8 said:
What size is your work piece?
Use a hand saw.
You could use a router by hand or in a router table.
Queation first
What hand saw would you recomend
Then the woffle
Im building a free standing cupboard under the stairs
I thinking stud wall joists for the frame (saving cash for fixtures and firtings) fix them all together with tenon and mortis and glue (learn something new) doing big cupboard at the end and draws in the first half so im looking at a lot of them and fronted with ply if i got clean cut nice lines or mdf if im going painted with nice router work on them
(So see what wifey wants paint or wood )
And i proberly try all the way untill i find one that works for me
 

deema

Established Member
Joined
14 Oct 2011
Messages
2,145
Reaction score
11
Location
chester
I’ve come to the view that for those really interested in woodworking, getting some good results quickly both keeps the rest of the family on side as well as boosting people’s confidence. For this reason, I think that investing in a chop saw and Festool Domino will allow just about anyone to quickly make most things to a very high standard. If woodworking is something you decide isn’t for you, you will get most of your money back selling these two items on. The Domino in particular holds its value.

The Domino will allow you to make loose mortice and tenon joints which is a recognised very good form of a mortice and tenon joint.

See Peter Millard 10 minute workshop on uTube for inspiration and how versatile these two tools are for making professional installations.
 

John15

Established Member
Joined
27 Jun 2013
Messages
1,592
Reaction score
18
Location
Near Oxford
Welcome to the forum.
To cut the tenons by hand, mark them out with a mortice gauge to the same width as the mortices, then cut with a tenon saw on the waste side of the line, then pare the cut faces with a chisel or hand router until you get a nice fit. Apply glue sparingly then clamp the joints until the glue has hardened.

John
 

A parkin

Member
Joined
1 May 2019
Messages
8
Reaction score
0
Location
SOUTHAMPTON
deema":1qp8as6j said:
I’ve come to the view that for those really interested in woodworking, getting some good results quickly both keeps the rest of the family on side as well as boosting people’s confidence. For this reason, I think that investing in a chop saw and Festool Domino will allow just about anyone to quickly make most things to a very high standard. If woodworking is something you decide isn’t for you, you will get most of your money back selling these two items on. The Domino in particular holds its value.

The Domino will allow you to make loose mortice and tenon joints which is a recognised very good form of a mortice and tenon joint.

See Peter Millard 10 minute workshop on uTube for inspiration and how versatile these two tools are for making professional installations.
Thanks for the heads up
Question is the domino better than the bisket jonner ??
Woffle
I got a what i think is a good chop saw on of the evolution range (build sheds becking garden funitrue with it)and i got a bisket joinner which im not that inpressed with but i guess time will tell as i gain experience im looking for a table saw at the moe my eyes keep looking at the evolution rage 5 (recommendations wellcome)
Must have solid fence
Im off to google/youtube domino joinner :p

P.s just look and festool is out of my price range im in the dewalt...mikita range. But i normaly buy cheaper and if i use it a lot then i invest in better tools i love the mikita drills and power saw
 

A parkin

Member
Joined
1 May 2019
Messages
8
Reaction score
0
Location
SOUTHAMPTON
John15":2y2wq13q said:
Welcome to the forum.
To cut the tenons by hand, mark them out with a mortice gauge to the same width as the mortices, then cut with a tenon saw on the waste side of the line, then pare the cut faces with a chisel or hand router until you get a nice fit. Apply glue sparingly then clamp the joints until the glue has hardened.

John
Thanks for the warm wellcome john ill try anything once m8 so ill pick up a tennon saw
 

profchris

Established Member
Joined
14 Jun 2015
Messages
748
Reaction score
33
Location
Suffolk
When you get your tenon saw, find some scrap and cut a few tenons first.

It's fairly easy to cut a straight and vertical line with a tenon saw, but not the very first half dozen!
 

deema

Established Member
Joined
14 Oct 2011
Messages
2,145
Reaction score
11
Location
chester
It’s a personal view, but I believe that the Domino is far more versatile than a biscuit jointer. Again IMO there are only two biscuit jointers worth considering, a Lamello and the Marfell. Accuracy and repeatability are key to success and most others don’t have the same level of quality. The price of these machines is the same if not higher than the Festool Domino.

With the loose tenon you can make anything that you would use a tradition tenon for. Equally, where a biscuit joint would be useful (mainly for alignment) you can use a loose tenon. There are two sizes of Domino machines, most people would buy the smaller machine first. The larger machine is more suited for much larger sections of wood needed for instance to make internal and external doors. The smaller machine will make chairs, cabinets, under stairs cupboards, kitchens and just about anything your likely to make.

If you progress, a decent rail saw would be my next recommendation. Again, I can’t recommend Peter Millards uTube stuff enough. He makes a living out of making cabinets and his primary tools are a track saw and a Domino. He has made excellent content on the Domino, track saws and other bits of kit comparing the budget and top end tools with some very surprising conclusions.

For most people starting out with very limited space to work, I feel it’s better to get sheet material (MDF or Ply) cut to your specific size needs with a hand saw as a back up for those times you’ve made an error and need another piece.
 

GrahamF

Established Member
Joined
11 May 2015
Messages
629
Reaction score
1
Location
Abergele and Portugal
A parkin":3v7bvexi said:
The mortis i get i can use a routor but what the best way to do a tenon

Hi sorry im tony im a week end wood worker just getting into wood work and i can not buy a dabo to cut a tenon. Bloody uk
My response to that is ... H&S should be got rid off and we can eradicate stupidity from the jean pool
HSE allow some types of dado stack but not others and the main problem is trying to find a table saw with a suitable arbor.

There are lots of DIY tenon cutting jigs on Youtube, here's one of the more complicated ones - https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=OgPP1FlEu_8
 

A parkin

Member
Joined
1 May 2019
Messages
8
Reaction score
0
Location
SOUTHAMPTON
GrahamF":28mdwfo8 said:
HSE allow some types of dado stack but not others and the main problem is trying to find a table saw with a suitable arbor.

There are lots of DIY tenon cutting jigs on Youtube, here's one of the more complicated ones - https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=OgPP1FlEu_8
If use or know of any dabo excepting saws that you would recomend please share :p
But thanks for the links i am enjoying watchin and learning
 

GrahamF

Established Member
Joined
11 May 2015
Messages
629
Reaction score
1
Location
Abergele and Portugal
I didn't managed to find a table saw at sensible price with long arbour but, have considered having an extended arbour made. My DeWalt RAS had a dado set but found the saw a bit restrictive, particularly ripping large sheets was a bit dodgy.
 

MikeG.

No longer posting.
Joined
24 Aug 2008
Messages
10,176
Reaction score
648
Location
Essex/ Suffolk border
I'm not following. On the one hand you are complaining that you can't get a dado in the UK, but on the other you are saying you haven't got room for a table saw. In which case, what saw, precisely, did you expect to fit a dado head to?

Tenons: square, tenon saw, chisel........and a bit of practise. £30 should cover the cost of the kit.
 

A parkin

Member
Joined
1 May 2019
Messages
8
Reaction score
0
Location
SOUTHAMPTON
MikeG.":2wnhu727 said:
I'm not following. On the one hand you are complaining that you can't get a dado in the UK, but on the other you are saying you haven't got room for a table saw. In which case, what saw, precisely, did you expect to fit a dado head to?

Tenons: square, tenon saw, chisel........and a bit of practise. £30 should cover the cost of the kit.
I said not got room for a table saw AS OF YET working out my work shop/shed thinking 12x 15 should be a good size if not a little small but with good space management should be fine

and I'm not retired why spend 30 mins making one tenon and mortis when I can do it in 5 mins with the power tools
anyway Axminister have released a table saw that will take a dado blade its only 1500 quid so please go to my go fund me page and fund my new table saw

( (hammer) =D> :D )
 

Trevanion

Greatest Of All Time
Joined
29 Jul 2018
Messages
3,495
Reaction score
319
Location
Pembrokeshire
"Dado" blades aren't as popular here as they are in the States but they can be found: https://www.scosarg.com/cmt-230-dado-set-d-200-b-6-35-22-23-d-30-z24. If you're lucky on eBay you might run across an old Wadkin or Dewalt Dado set for not a lot of money.

This style of "dado" blade (They're called adjustable groovers or trenchers here :D) is more popular here in the UK: https://www.scosarg.com/omas-adjustable-groover-d-30-d-160-z-4-b-12-5-22. Replaceable carbides are great and last a long time before needing to be replaced, 2-piece construction means less faffing around with 4 or 5 blades with numerous spacer and complies with HSE standards so long as the machine is properly guarded and braked etc... Here's a photo of one set up in a radial arm saw for the trenching cuts on Boxed sash window cill:



You do need at least a 3HP machine to run them though, anything else will just bog down or not even start up.
 

monster

Established Member
Joined
11 Jun 2019
Messages
71
Reaction score
3
Location
Bournemouth
Ive just cut the tenons on the sash window I'm making with a router table and the ones on the meeting rail with a tenon saw by hand.

I think a bandsaw may be the easiest way - but yet to get my hands on one to try.
 

Latest posts

Top