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Tenon joints into veneered Chipboard?

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bp122

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A while ago I came across a couple of solid core (I think that's what they are called) oak veneered doors that someone was selling as they were clearing a house and I bought them.

I have seen a lot of people here advocate these to be used as workbench tops.

I understand that building a knockdown Nicholson style workbench would be more suited with this kind of top as no notice and tenons go into the top. But if I were to (daftly) consider making a Ruobo style workbench with stout tenons going into the top, would it work?

The door is 35mm thick and I was opening on using two stacked on top of each other.

Love to hear your thoughts.
 

Jacob

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No strength in veneered chipboard. I'd see it as a lay on top to be dropped on to a strong table but not as part of the structure. I doubt it'd be very durable under a lot of use - but then you could just lift it off and replace it.
 

Jameshow

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If I were you I would put them on a solid 4x4 legs and 8x2 apron frame with a shelf to brace it.

Before putting the doors on it I would put a sheet of 3/4 in plywood on first, this will then be in tension when you hit the bench and the chipboard will be in compression. Which suits the material properties.

The remainder of the sheet can be your shelf underneath.

Cheers James
 

bp122

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If I were you I would put them on a solid 4x4 legs and 8x2 apron frame with a shelf to brace it.

Before putting the doors on it I would put a sheet of 3/4 in plywood on first, this will then be in tension when you hit the bench and the chipboard will be in compression. Which suits the material properties.

The remainder of the sheet can be your shelf underneath.

Cheers James
That's a good approach, as most materials like Chipboard are better in compression. I like that.
 
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