Table saw suitable for cutting blanks?

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recipio

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Tablesaws are not suitable for cutting green wood. The dangers of kickback are very real. Nothing beats a bandsaw with a 3 TPI blade for roughing out blanks ,wet or dry.
 

Wildman

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A much finer blade in this style, the other is a log saw.
 

Shan

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It's an Evolution Rage 5s. 255mm blade (10"). Good value with folding stand and sliding table which makes it handy in my tiny workshop as it can be folded away when not in use.
Coincidentally I purchased the Evolution sliding mitre saw from Screwfix when they delivered to Portugal and I've been really pleased with it! Due to the thickness of the trunks I would prefer a 12"/315mm blade and I don't think that make them that size. But you've pointed me in the right direction so thanks for that. How did you rotate the trunks when cutting? Did you screw them to the faceplate?
 

Rodpr

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I agree with recipio that cutting green wood on the table saw is not to be recommended. The bandsaw is much safer. Thinking back I actually used this jig to cut blanks from an offcut of oak worktop - seasoned wood. I screwed a faceplate to the blank. The face plate sat in the recess in the jig, a snug fit but allowing the blank to be rotated. This allowed me to make a 12" blank - the most I can fit on my little Jet lathe. I made a couple of platters.
IMG_20200515_152758878.jpg
 

Shan

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I agree with recipio that cutting green wood on the table saw is not to be recommended. The bandsaw is much safer. Thinking back I actually used this jig to cut blanks from an offcut of oak worktop - seasoned wood. I screwed a faceplate to the blank. The face plate sat in the recess in the jig, a snug fit but allowing the blank to be rotated. This allowed me to make a 12" blank - the most I can fit on my little Jet lathe. I made a couple of platters.View attachment 126404
The platters look very nice. I'll keep an open mind on either going with a table saw or bandsaw but forking out over €500 for a bandsaw just to carve up some blanks seems to be a bit excessive, more so when I probably won't use it too much. But the feedback has been helpful so thanks a lot. Cheers 🖒🖒🖒
 

D_W

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battery or electric chainsaw, then an ECE 700mm-ish turning saw as option two, hatches and axes (and do most of the rough sizing green- which I'm sure you're thinking of).

I don't do a lot of turning, and don't have a bandsaw, but have done plenty of cutting with turning saws and resawing with frame saws - it's not that bad.

But you learn quickly not to do bulk junk if you're going to do a lot by hand (as in, you won't be making meaningless turnings out of cheap junk wood - which I think is not a bad thing. Work by hand and you'll tend to look for ways to make things nicer rather than faster).
 

Shan

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battery or electric chainsaw, then an ECE 700mm-ish turning saw as option two, hatches and axes (and do most of the rough sizing green- which I'm sure you're thinking of).

I don't do a lot of turning, and don't have a bandsaw, but have done plenty of cutting with turning saws and resawing with frame saws - it's not that bad.

But you learn quickly not to do bulk junk if you're going to do a lot by hand (as in, you won't be making meaningless turnings out of cheap junk wood - which I think is not a bad thing. Work by hand and you'll tend to look for ways to make things nicer rather than faster).
I guess you have a point. Doing the majority of the process of getting it prepared before turning it by hand makes one appreciate the whole thing more. I'll press on with the chainsaw in the meantime but the wood that I have access to (at home) is a bit of a mixed bag. Not much green wood but some pine and a huge trunk of chestnut that was given to me by the neighbours. Being new to turning I've got a decent supply to practice on which seems to be a good place to start. Maybe I should have started the thread in the woodturning section but new to the forum so bit 'green' on it myself.
 

Shan

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Tablesaws are not suitable for cutting green wood. The dangers of kickback are very real. Nothing beats a bandsaw with a 3 TPI blade for roughing out blanks ,wet or dry.
What are the dangers of kickback exactly? I'm not trying to swivel the blanks whilst pushing them through when cutting. I'll only cut the sharp corners off. The bottom of the blank will sit flat on the table. So start with a square then octagonal etc. It doesn't have to be totally round as can soon round it up on the lathe.
 

TheTiddles

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The risk is of the blank rotating slightly during the cut, the back of it touching the rising blade and it being lifted up. Mostly preventable, crown guard will inhibit it to
 

Shan

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The risk is of the blank rotating slightly during the cut, the back of it touching the rising blade and it being lifted up. Mostly preventable, crown guard will inhibit it to
So if I was cutting a blank that was higher than the blade, that would be a real no no? Like if the max blade height was 80mm and I'm cutting a blank of 100mm for example.
 

TheTiddles

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So if I was cutting a blank that was higher than the blade, that would be a real no no? Like if the max blade height was 80mm and I'm cutting a blank of 100mm for example.
It can be done.
It’s not a good plan, you’d have to remove the crown guard and then make an alternative one for the purpose, or leave it off… and that’s the first line of an accident report

Really this is a bandsaw job or do it by hand, it’s not that hard in green wood
 

GrahamF

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Cheers, thanks for the feedback. Just to clarify, I cut the trunks with a chain saw & only need to knock the sharp corners off the half cut trunks. Ideally a bandsaw would suffice but they seem to be about 4x the cost of a table saw and I will only use a bandsaw for this purpose. Space is an issue and struggle to justify paying so much for one when a table saw could serve other options. Just to add can either go single or 3 phase and a saw with a 315mm blade would be enough to cut up most of the blanks for the lathe.

Maxmat are doing an Einhell bandsaw for €199 (maybe + 23% IVA), there's a branch not far from Faro - TC-SB 200/1 | MaxMat Just had another look at the advert and it seems maybe too small, sorry.
 
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Shan

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Maxmat are doing an Einhell bandsaw for €199 (maybe + 23% IVA), there's a branch not far from Faro - TC-SB 200/1 | MaxMat Just had another look at the advert and it seems maybe too small, sorry.
Graham, thanks for the tip. Yeah probably a bit small. I really need one with the cutting height 150mm. I'm on the hunt looking in Olx that seems to be the best place for 2nd stuff. I got my lathe via the site and fortunately it's a pretty hefty one so doesn't burk too much if the blanks aren't completely round. I actually cut a few up yesterday with the chainsaw so got something to crack on with in the meantime. Cheers
 

recipio

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What are the dangers of kickback exactly? I'm not trying to swivel the blanks whilst pushing them through when cutting. I'll only cut the sharp corners off. The bottom of the blank will sit flat on the table. So start with a square then octagonal etc. It doesn't have to be totally round as can soon round it up on the lathe.
If I understand correctly you are starting with a square and want to cut it into a hexagon or octagon ? The problem with green wood is that it moves on cutting and may pinch the blade. Resin also builds up on the blade. The damp sawdust encourages rust on the saw. If you must do it there are videos on the tube showing how to build a sled that secures the piece at the correct angle assuming you have a slot or two on the saw. Of course you lose some of the cutting depth and you would probably have to flip the piece over to cut anything over 2". A handsaw would be less hassle until you invest in a bandsaw.
 

Woody2Shoes

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A bandsaw is the perfect tool for this.

A bow saw or a frame saw - but only with a raker-tooth blade suitable for 'wet'/'green' freshly cut timber - would be fine. e.g. Bahco Bowsaw Blades

If you're splitting a log along the grain, a froe is a good idea e.g.
and is cleaner, greener and quieter than the chain saw!
 

Hornbeam

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It can be done.
It’s not a good plan, you’d have to remove the crown guard and then make an alternative one for the purpose, or leave it off… and that’s the first line of an accident report

Really this is a bandsaw job or do it by hand, it’s not that hard in green wood
I could trim my toe nails with an angle grinder but, Use the right tool for the job
 
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