Table saw suitable for cutting blanks?

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Shan

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Hello Folks, new to the forum and this is my 1st post! Anyways just after some tips/advice on purchasing a suitable table saw to cut up blanks for turning bowls. I say table saw as opposed to a bandsaw as they seem to be much cheaper and I think that I would get more all round use from a table saw. Been looking for a 2nd hand one and ideally want one that is robust but also accurate. Do they exist? The job site one's seem powerful but not too sure about how accurate they are if I want to use it for other things and the smaller ones don't look like they are very robust. I'm living in Portugal and don't have the same range as what you might find on EBay but any suggestions or brands very appreciated? Regards Shan
 

Shan

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Cheers, thanks for the feedback. Just to clarify, I cut the trunks with a chain saw & only need to knock the sharp corners off the half cut trunks. Ideally a bandsaw would suffice but they seem to be about 4x the cost of a table saw and I will only use a bandsaw for this purpose. Space is an issue and struggle to justify paying so much for one when a table saw could serve other options. Just to add can either go single or 3 phase and a saw with a 315mm blade would be enough to cut up most of the blanks for the lathe.
 

TheTiddles

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If you want to do it cheap then make up a frame saw, with wet wood it’ll cut quick and be very small and cheap, unless you’re doing a lot it’s not a lot of work
 

Ttrees

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Bandsaw is the tool you want, and even then you need a way of flattening the bottom of the work, i.e a handplane,
otherwise the blade will likely get damaged.
I don't think a TS is the way to go here, as there's a lot more to go wrong.
That's a tool for dimensioned stock already.
 

Shan

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I've tried the chainsaw and it worked out reasonably ok but kept running off didn't make a great job. Probably would have helped if I clamped down the trunk better. But I hear what people are saying. Use the right tool for the job.
 

Shan

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Bow saw. Got it now. Yeah good idea. I do have a bow saw an all but mainly used for pruning trees etc. Could be a long old job especially on some hard chestnut trunks but might go back to the chainsaw option in the meantime. Cheers Tiddles. 🖒🖒🖒
 

Cabinetman

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With care and two full length push sticks you won’t come to any harm cutting the corners off on a tablesaw, I’ve done (in effect) the same thing many many many times. Start off slow and push it through straight.
Probably a whole lot safer than a chainsaw on idly little bits. Ian
 

Rodpr

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Before I got a band saw I made up a jig for my table saw. Half log mounted on faceplate and faceplate held in the jig which had a slider to go in mitre slot. By rotating the log between cuts I could make it as round as I wanted (more passes) and I could set the radius to make sure the blank would turn on my lathe. If the finished blank was unbalanced I would also use an electric plane to take down any high points.
IMG_20200513_123118391.jpg

I havent used the jig since I got a handsaw.
 

Phil Pascoe

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Bow saw. Got it now. Yeah good idea. I do have a bow saw an all but mainly used for pruning trees etc. Could be a long old job especially on some hard chestnut trunks but might go back to the chainsaw option in the meantime. Cheers Tiddles. 🖒🖒🖒
I think what you (and manufacturers) are calling a bow saw is a log saw. I think this is the type of bow saw meant -
1641717311596.png
 

Adam W.

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I've tried the chainsaw and it worked out reasonably ok but kept running off didn't make a great job. Probably would have helped if I clamped down the trunk better. But I hear what people are saying. Use the right tool for the job.
Or use an axe if you're messing with tiddly bits of wood. Unlike most axes it needs to be kept very sharp to be a safe tool to use, and remember to keep your other hand out of the way.

as @ 1:42 in Robin Woods video.........

 

Shan

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Before I got a band saw I made up a jig for my table saw. Half log mounted on faceplate and faceplate held in the jig which had a slider to go in mitre slot. By rotating the log between cuts I could make it as round as I wanted (more passes) and I could set the radius to make sure the blank would turn on my lathe. If the finished blank was unbalanced I would also use an electric plane to take down any high points.
View attachment 126372
I havent used the jig since I got a handsaw.
Rodpr, I like your idea and probably a bit more elaborate than what I had in mind but looks like it did a good job of knocking off the sharp corners before turning. What size blade did the saw have and obviously need one with the slide rails. Some of the saw's I've seen are just a plain table top. Cheers
 

Rodpr

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It's an Evolution Rage 5s. 255mm blade (10"). Good value with folding stand and sliding table which makes it handy in my tiny workshop as it can be folded away when not in use.
 
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