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JimWoodwork1975

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Should you lubricate the table for, ahem, better slide and glide? If so what's the best thing to use?

Also, what's peoples view on using a blade guard? Yay or nay?
 

sunnybob

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You have be absolutely insane, or an american, to not use a blade guard.
Very hard paste or microcrystaline wax, or even beeswax for the table.
 

JimWoodwork1975

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Thanks Bob, I think I'll the leave blade guard on : ) I just started thinking it gives a bit of a false sense of security, and it's a bit of a pain. Not as painful as chopping your fingers off granted.
 

sunnybob

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I sometimes remove the guard and riving knife when using the cross cut sled, but its put back as soon as i finish.
Its also very useful in stopping you being bombarded with dust and chips (I hope youre wearing glasses!).
I know, I know, safety stuff is boring as hell, but you only get one set of lungs and eyes and ears. If you dont protect them, doesnt matter how much money you spent outfitting your workshop.
 

JimWoodwork1975

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Only my own normal glasses, I haven't noticed much dust coming towards me - it's my first table saw, an Evolution Rage 5S. A decent saw for starting out I think. Not top pro level obviously.

You wear safety goggles and a mask? I do use ear plugs.
 

deema

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Never, ever under any circumstances should you run the saw without the riving knife and either the crown guard or some other guarding to keep your digits attached. People do, and people keep having to have parts stitched back on / up.

I’ve had just about ever flavour of Wadkin Table saws, Sedgwick, Startrite and lot of SCMs and a Felder and regardless of how much suction I’ve had, or arrangement of under and over extraction the person feeding the saw always gets a snow storm of dust. Dusk mask, ear and eye protection are the norm in my opinion.
 

sunnybob

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Trust me, every woodworking machine puts out enough dust to wreck your lungs forever. Go surfing for COPD, or miners black lung, which is just coal dust rather than wood dust. You really, really dont want that to happen to you.
Use dust extraction, wear a good mask to at least FFP3 specification.
Glasses would be a good extra, but if the blade is not fully covered, glasses are MANDATORY.

Theres a story about a welder using a disc grinder on rusty metal; the boss comes along and says "why arent you wearing safety glasses I provided"?
The man says
"Boss, I already lost one eye from sparks, what are the chances of me getting a second strike"?
the boss says
"Better odds than me employing a blind welder".

Personal safety isnt sexy, but it prolongs your life.
 

jeremyduncombe

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I have breathing problems so I use a powered respirator pretty well every time I go in the workshop. I wear glasses inside it, no problems and perfectly comfortable.
 

JimWoodwork1975

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sunnybob":1hy2c1sl said:
You have be absolutely insane, or an american, to not use a blade guard.
Very hard paste or microcrystaline wax, or even beeswax for the table.
I used some beeswax balsam I use on my snooker cue, what a difference, cheers Bob! Oh and blade guard on!
 

woodbloke66

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We're discussing primarily hobbyists here who can take whatever risks they want regarding elf n'safety within the confines of their own workshops. The situation is very different in professional shops where a whole raft of H&S regulations has to be met and abided by which includes guarding on the table saw; as such it's illegal (and has been from the 1960's) to remove the crown guard and riving knife. I once saw a very reputable maker ask my then boss if he could remove them as it would make his life a lot easier. The reply was a flat 'no' with a couple of suitable adjectives added for good measure.
I don't use table saws at all; for the type of work I do they are completely unnecessary but I did have a couple of some years ago and did on occasion remove the guarding...that was until I saw the light.
Short answer is that the guard and riving knife are there for a very good reason and you remove them at your peril - Rob
 

Deadeye

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sunnybob":3aobak45 said:
You have be absolutely insane, or an american, to not use a blade guard.
Very hard paste or microcrystaline wax, or even beeswax for the table.
Just out if interest why do the 'muricans think so differently on this? We're quite forthright about it being essential but plenty of them are equally clear it's not - that nice Mr wandel for example
 

sunnybob

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I suspect its because they do a lot of dado's and rebates (rabbets in amerispeak) and use cross cut sleds all the time.
I do take the riving knife and blade off for those kind of cuts, but I do put them straight back on afterwards.
Theres also the fact that nowadays very few "woodworkers" on youtube have ever had an apprenticeship or even been trained properly on the machines they use.
 

Simon_M

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sunnybob":rc0ygbcj said:
I do take the riving knife and blade off for those kind of cuts, but I do put them straight back on afterwards
I don't know how your riving knife and blade guard are attached. On my DW745 the guard can be removed leaving the riving knife in-situ. With my cross sled, there is a "bridge" between the two parts that are the base and it will interfere with the riving knife because it was only cut to the height of the saw blade (and the guard has to be attached to the top of the riving knife so has to be higher than the cut).

My last two cross sled have had "deep" bridges. I was going to extend the cut by hand higher to give sufficient clearance so that the riving knife could be left on for all types of cut. Is that a good idea? With a rip cut, the riving knife prevents the cut wood binding to minimise kickback, but with a cross cut the danger of kickback is minimised but not eliminated? Unless I need to use the cross sled, the riving knife is always replaced. Perhaps leaving it on all the time and adapting the sled is the best solution?
 

sunnybob

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I wouldnt dream of claiming to be an expert with a table saw, its still my newest toy..... OOPS... tool. :roll:

I rarely use the cross cut sled as I have a bandsaw and a mitre saw, but I have sometimes used the table saw to cut some unconventional grooves and shapes that would have elfinsafety fainting in their boots. :shock:
I've worked with dangerous machines of many kinds for over 40 years, so know what can be done and what should not be done, and I dont advertise the "risky" stuff I do to other people who might not be as experienced.
Cutting grooves on the underside of stuff requires the knife to be gone because its higher than the blade, but safety is a habit, and I make it a habit of refitting the knife and guard immediately after finishing the cuts. =D>
 

Trevanion

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sunnybob":14l7441m said:
I've worked with dangerous machines of many kinds for over 40 years, so know what can be done and what should not be done, and I dont advertise the "risky" stuff I do to other people who might not be as experienced.
Cutting grooves on the underside of stuff requires the knife to be gone because its higher than the blade, but safety is a habit, and I make it a habit of refitting the knife and guard immediately after finishing the cuts. =D>
"Concentration can play the most important part in avoiding injury. Accidents rarely happen on jobs that may be considered dangerous because the operator is on the alert. The every day or commonplace operations often lull the operator into carelessness or to have some contempt for danger." - Frank L. Dunsmore
 
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