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Anonymous

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After taking your advice about not using my circular saw as a table saw i have now got a 10 inch clarke saw i know its not top of the range but its all i can afford for now it is second hand all works fine but the blade is rusty all tips are there but would like to know the best tipe off blade for it
i wont be ripping big sheet or long runs it is just for basic stuff
thanx lee
 

frank

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lee get a freud blade you wont go wrong it costs a bob or two. but you can put it on your new cast iron table saw when you get it :p
 

houtslager

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Lee, for rough work ie ripping solid timber a 24 tooth blade
For general work in solid, and in sheet goods I use a 48 carbide jobbie,
then for fine cross cut work a 80 tooth.
For the real important stuff ,agin a 90 TCC - triple chipped darbide - bloody expensive but worth it IMO.
all the best with the new saw .

btw whatchaget ?
 
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Anonymous

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I used a 40 tooth Freud ona similar saw many years ago and have always kept with that configuration as OK for ripping and superb for cross-cut. For ply etc., I have a triple point (every 3rd tooth scores the wood) 80 tooth blade

40 tooth freud will work great :wink:
 
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Anonymous

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thanks for all replys guys plenty to think about now

i have been thinking of taking it of the tin box and fitting it in a wooden one some thing like a router table but keep the top as it is very noisy even though i have fitted rubber feet between box and legs . What do you think will this help
thanks lee
 

frank

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lee go for the 40 tooth it will turn your clarke into a half decent saw make your self a outfeed table and a side table and spend a bit of time tuning it ie get the blade inline with the mitre slot use a small steel sqare to true the blade to 90 % and wear some ear defenders cos it is b++++y NOISY
 
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Anonymous

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Thanx for that Frank unfortunatly i dont have room for the outfeed but i have found a 40 tooth blade local and getting it tomorrow i have looked at the line and it is out a little bit so that will get done tomorrow too .

I am now starting to really enjoy what i am doing now i am getting used to working with wood and not steel only prob is you cant weld wood when you make a mistake :lol: if i can work out how to put a pic on i will put my first project on
 

frank

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lee if you send me £200 cash i will tell you the secret of sticking two bits of wood ,i will also send you a bottle of the secret white wood welding stuff at no extra cost it will be sent in a plain brown box .now that will get the neighbours talking \:D/
 

StewieH

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hi Lee, cannot agree with Frank more, always wear ear defenders ( i'd also add eye protection too) you only get one set of ears and eyes so it pays to protect them., and without them you are up the proverbial creek without propulsion............

Stu.
 
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Anonymous

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yep thanx for that i always wear protection
saw much better now with new blade cuts a lot nicer
 

Dewy

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Nothing wrong with a cheap table saw once you get used to making the most of it and learn its limitations.
I've been using a Draper 10" saw for a number of years.
I bought it before the sheds started stocking them to a price.
What would now cost approx £100 I thought a bargain at £280 and it has paid for itself with the many uses I have put it to.
I am limited to about 10" rip cuts and am determined to upgrade to a small saw with side extension table and sliding carriage (just to make things easier)
The first thing I made for it was a panel cutting jig which gets used for almost every job.
This was followed by a high jig that slides along the rip fence which doubles as both a tenon jig and for cutting raised door panels.
One jig that gets a lot of use is for cross cutting the shoulders on tenons which has the advantage of an adjustable stop with a scale marked on it to make the tenons at whichever length I want for the particulat project.
It's given sterling service for 6-7 years and should last until I have enough in the piggy bank for a Sheppach 2010, Electra Beckum PK200 or a Kity 419 or win the lottery which would allow me to build the dream workshop filled with every decent machine that I have every night until I wake up. ;)
 
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Anonymous

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Fraid no room for wide extensions only one thing i don't like is the guard and anti kick blades they are very flimsy and move at the slitest touch so when i do a cut it will catch on the guard mount and stop the wood going through oh and the fence is a we bit iffy but that ain't much of a problem i just use the ruler instead of the measure on the table
 

amilford

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Dewy, your "high jig" sounds interesting. Is it a bit like Norms (NYW) tenon jig he uses on his table saw, but to run on the fence?
Surely you have to remove the blade guard and riving knife to use it?
Have you any pics?
 

Dewy

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Yes amilford
Thats always a problem using some jigs.
Both the guard and riving knife must be removed to use them.
You have to be very carful when doing any work with the guards removed.
The 'high' jig is just an 'h' shape made with 18mm plywood to slide along the rip fence.
The high part has a couple of slots cut down from the top to enable clamps to slide down to hold the workpiece and an upright end stop to hold the work while sawing.
Although not as good as an adjustable jig this can also be used to saw the thickness cuts on tenons (if you are able to adjust the fence small amounts)
Cuts like these dont need a riving knife although safety must always be uppermost in your mind when working with the guard removed.
I've worked all my life in a machine shop where it was impossible to use cutter guards because of the type of work but always thought about my own safety and never had any accidents with moving cutters.
 

amilford

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Thanks Dewy
I do sometimes remove the guard, the other day I wanted to cut a square out of the corner of a bit of 2x2, ie to make it a L shaped profile, which needed the riving knife and guard to be removed (they are the same thing on my saw - the guard sits on top of the knife).
It just gives me the willy's having that exposed blade whizzing around - still maybe that's just as well as a bit of healthy fear and respect .....
One day I'd like to make one of those guards which hang from the top so at least in that sort of cut there is still a guard.
 

Dewy

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I was forever taking the guard off then putting it back as I seldom used the table saw for rip cuts.
I use it mainly for sizing panels using a panel cutting jig and shoulder cuts on tenons using my home made adjustable jig both of which the riving knife and guard got in the way of the cuts.
I finally left the guards off all the time but my son saw what I was doing and told me to put them back.
I eventually gave in to his nagging after running out of excuses. :lol:
 
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