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Stanleymonkey

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Great tips, thanks.

That was the plan anyway. But we have moved in with the in-laws for the duration of the lockdown. So I only get to go back home once or twice a week to collect mail or just to do a general check. Once I go back, I may just follow your advice about the quiet sorting in the evenings after the little one falls asleep.
I bought another baby monitor when mine got older. I could listen in on the doorbell or anyone calling out from the shed. Not being irresponsible - just wife could settle down to watch her TV or chat to a friend on the phone and I would listen out for the kids and get on with my stuff.
 

Bm101

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My shed evolution has been a constant struggle of evolution. I have a good bit of space for a hobbyist but I put up with stuff in my shed that I would never tolerate at work. Over time I have learned what I actually use, don't use often, might possibly come in useful, what can be stored in boxes in the event of an apocalypse, what I should throw out but can't because my dad gave them to me, stuff I bought because I was convinced I would use all the time but have actually never used, stuff I thought was useful but was only good for a one off operation.
There seems to be a pattern emerging.... By now I realise I could sell half of the contents and carry on at my standard without blinking.

When I started out I thought I'd be doing one thing, turns out I'm actually doing a whole lot of different stuff. I've learned about machinary and made proper repairs to proper old industrial tools. I've learnt about heating and tempering steels and I've dipped my toes in the serene and aquamarine waters (lol) of backyard toolmaking to a half decent standard (those are my standards mind not the far superior standards of others!).
I originally came here to make an green oak porch.

Still not started that. I have built a proper bench, got tools, learned a vast array of sh*t that most normal people have absolutely NO interest in (lol), met some fantastic people both online and in real life because of woodworking. It's been an adventure and I've took a lot of wrong turns. Sometimes into the dark forest where I lost my way. Sometimes I stumbled into a sunny glade where I met a Kind and Wise Stranger who helped me on my journey.

But through brute force, ignorance and sheer bloody minded enjoyment and love of wood I'm still here. My shed is no longer a no man's land but you can walk around in there, after four years the Mrs has altogether given up trying to store shi*e in here. I have a stereo, it's mostly organised enough to work in, my (young) kids come down and sit with me which is lovely. They know it's my spot and they enjoy that seperation from the house.

What I'm saying is. Crack on mate. Some people will have their spaces organised like an Investment Bank's weekend team building exercise with lists and timetables and social media.
Who cares?!?
Do what you have to do with the time and space you have available. Times will change, you will become a master of your space given time (and a little discipline never hurts).

The key thing is to carry on carrying on.
Keep your chin up bud.
Best regards
Chris


It's_dangerous_to_go_alone!_Take_this..png
 

gcusick

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Just keep throwing it away.
Anything board wise under 1m long or 600mm wide toss.
Clutter creates more issue than the "savings" achieved.
That’s it! I used to have a world-class collection of bits of wood 100mm too short! Not much matches the satisfaction of a car full of junk to the recycling centre.
 

Peri

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My shed is a single garage, and as Andy said, just enough space for me and a project - but I love it.
I have stuff hanging from the ceiling, hardly a wall space without a shelf or rack on it ....... it's more like a cocoon at times haha.
If it's your hobby I think its just important you like being there, it's not important what it looks like.
 

bp122

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My shed evolution has been a constant struggle of evolution. I have a good bit of space for a hobbyist but I put up with stuff in my shed that I would never tolerate at work. Over time I have learned what I actually use, don't use often, might possibly come in useful, what can be stored in boxes in the event of an apocalypse, what I should throw out but can't because my dad gave them to me, stuff I bought because I was convinced I would use all the time but have actually never used, stuff I thought was useful but was only good for a one off operation.
There seems to be a pattern emerging.... By now I realise I could sell half of the contents and carry on at my standard without blinking.

When I started out I thought I'd be doing one thing, turns out I'm actually doing a whole lot of different stuff. I've learned about machinary and made proper repairs to proper old industrial tools. I've learnt about heating and tempering steels and I've dipped my toes in the serene and aquamarine waters (lol) of backyard toolmaking to a half decent standard (those are my standards mind not the far superior standards of others!).
I originally came here to make an green oak porch.

Still not started that. I have built a proper bench, got tools, learned a vast array of sh*t that most normal people have absolutely NO interest in (lol), met some fantastic people both online and in real life because of woodworking. It's been an adventure and I've took a lot of wrong turns. Sometimes into the dark forest where I lost my way. Sometimes I stumbled into a sunny glade where I met a Kind and Wise Stranger who helped me on my journey.

But through brute force, ignorance and sheer bloody minded enjoyment and love of wood I'm still here. My shed is no longer a no man's land but you can walk around in there, after four years the Mrs has altogether given up trying to store shi*e in here. I have a stereo, it's mostly organised enough to work in, my (young) kids come down and sit with me which is lovely. They know it's my spot and they enjoy that seperation from the house.

What I'm saying is. Crack on mate. Some people will have their spaces organised like an Investment Bank's weekend team building exercise with lists and timetables and social media.
Who cares?!?
Do what you have to do with the time and space you have available. Times will change, you will become a master of your space given time (and a little discipline never hurts).

The key thing is to carry on carrying on.
Keep your chin up bud.
Best regards
Chris


View attachment 97074
That is very well put, Chris.
Thank you.
 

billw

The Tattooed One
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I must admit if I could go back in time I’d do things very differently, I should have bought things to build workbenches and units, then once they were built flog then off to buy tools to make things on the benches.
 

Ttrees

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A different tack than most would go for, but for one who wants maximum strength with no fixings to walls, and to save space/gain more light than timber might provide, is to go to Lidl and buy the cheapest and probably one of the smallest arc welders you can buy for about forty pounds.
I've knocked up a few things for the workshop with it, and its proved its worth.
Its only about the size of a shoe box, and I'm told that you can buy plugs for the leads instead of them being hard wired, as that is where you can loose space if your tightly packing stuff away.
What a practical thing to have for the workshop, for the rest of the junk, in jest I suggest building one of these interesting ladders
and fling all that sh1te up in the attic ;)
 

Lons

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I can spot the ones who will be back on here in a few weeks asking if anyone's got an old Whitworth bolt in the right size... :)
I bet I still have some Andy, I throw very little away and it's amazing how many times that has saved a trip to suppliers or a wait for deliveries not to mention the cost. Not everyone has space of course and even I have a little clear out now and then. :ROFLMAO:
 

Phil Pascoe

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I cleared off a bench before we moved house and found forty one pencils, seven squares and eleven Stanley knives.
Some years before I bought a spokeshave for a particular job as I couldn't find one ............ I found six within a week.
As for Stanley egg beaters, I supplied half the forum. :LOL:
 

bp122

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A different tack than most would go for, but for one who wants maximum strength with no fixings to walls, and to save space/gain more light than timber might provide, is to go to Lidl and buy the cheapest and probably one of the smallest arc welders you can buy for about forty pounds.
I've knocked up a few things for the workshop with it, and its proved its worth.
Its only about the size of a shoe box, and I'm told that you can buy plugs for the leads instead of them being hard wired, as that is where you can loose space if your tightly packing stuff away.
What a practical thing to have for the workshop, for the rest of the junk, in jest I suggest building one of these interesting ladders
and fling all that sh1te up in the attic ;)
But isn't sensible gauge steel more expensive to buy than DIY soft wood (2x4 etc)? I am a little confused? I'm genuinely interested in your ideas.
 

RogerS

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....

I ask all of you who have been doing this for years, do you have the same amount of clutter due to "acute hoarding syndrome" proportional to the length of time you have been doing it?
....
Absolutely. You've not heard of Roger's Rules of Wood Sequestering?

Rule No.1 - If a piece of timber is wide enough, it won't be thick enough

Rule No.2 - If a piece of timber is wide enough and thick enough then it won't be long enough

Rule No.3 - If a piece of timber is wide enough, thick enough and long enough then you'll find that you have n-1 where n is the number that you need.
 

bp122

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Absolutely. You've not heard of Roger's Rules of Wood Sequestering?

Rule No.1 - If a piece of timber is wide enough, it won't be thick enough

Rule No.2 - If a piece of timber is wide enough and thick enough then it won't be long enough

Rule No.3 - If a piece of timber is wide enough, thick enough and long enough then you'll find that you have n-1 where n is the number that you need.
I actually laughed out loud!
 

Cabinetman

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I don’t know if this will help for bits of timber, one is a wall mounted box affair, it has its depth written on it so that I know approximately the length of bits of wood that are in it. Underneath it has a handle from an old age pensioners steps or door, I use it to hang all my G cramps on. The other bit of kit is just a floorstanding frame/box with cardboard tubes in it (from a carpet shop) very useful for long thin pieces of wood. Ian
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Ttrees

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My post just disappeared, but to sum it up for me...
I would say that steel is good to have about, and is good for benches for the pillar drill for example, It would need to be sturdy and thick if it were wood, and not be as space saving.
As for the expense of steel, I bought 6 meters of 50x50x5 angle iron, 5 mm is as thick as anyone would ever need and it came to under 35 euros.

I usually have pipe and whatnot of a lighter gauge that's knocking about, and usually find a way of using this stuff up rather than making everything from 5mm angle iron, so I buy the angle iron or flat bar that length.

Welding is quite practical asset in the workshop to have, and I really should be taking my own advice, as I have to make my benches mobile sooner rather than later, (I have a good twinge in my back from moving a stuffed bench) :rolleyes:

Tom
 

segovia

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I have stuff I used regularly in my workshop and stuff I don't use that much goes in the garage if it stays in the garage more than a year and not used it gets sold or scrapped. I found 5 bandsaw blade guides recently in a box, been there 8 years. I sold them on e-bay for £30.00 each !
 
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I'm a beginner and I've found making storage for the workshop works well for me. I get to create, but I'm tidying and organising at the same time. I have french cleats on a good space of the wall and find I can make little holders for tools in an hour or so, gets me the woodworking fix and helps organise at the same time.
 
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