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Garno

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Managed to get the chuck off, Clamped a strong, large, spanner in and gave it a light tap with a rubber mallet and that did the trick. It surprised me just how light a tap was needed.
Thank you everyone for your help. Here are the photo's as promised but sadly they have in turn produced even more questions.
IMG_20201216_131235.jpg


Thread after removing chuck.

IMG_20201216_131249.jpg


This is the plate I had to turn around as the holding screws did not line up with it the other way around. The ridges you can see fit perfectly into the hole where the bottom of the pullies are but as I say the holes just do not line up when like that.


IMG_20201216_131326.jpg


Light rusting and alternate thread view, note it is inside something that is round I do have a reason for mentioning that :)

IMG_20201216_131346.jpg


Chuck and next to it something that can screw into it also the mini chrome rod to the left of it fits into holes (Holes do no go all the way through)

IMG_20201216_131534.jpg


Markings on the above thing that can screw into the chuck, the end my thumb is stuck into can screw onto the thread shown in images 1 and 3

IMG_20201216_131537.jpg


The remaining markings. This was not on the machine as the chuck was screwed onto the thread (in 1 and 3) directly.

IMG_20201216_131547.jpg


The chuck, it's a lot heavier that I expected.

IMG_20201216_131604.jpg


I was hoping to capture the individual numbers 1 - 4 on each block but failed 😜

IMG_20201216_131627.jpg


Rear of chuck, all of the holes are numbered, Do any of you know why and is it something that will come in handy in the future?

IMG_20201216_131648.jpg


Side view
 

J-G

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The numbers. holes and side indents (detents) are for indexing. That is so that you can set up a means by which a 'peg' can locate in either a hole or detent which will aid in marking - or even cutting - lines or grooves along the length of a piece of spindle work or radial ines etc. on face work.

The item marked KP96-E is an insert to convert the mounting from the native 1" x 8 to 3/4" X 16 which you will only need if you have another lathe with the smaller thread.
 

Garno

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Only allowed to post 10 images per reply


IMG_20201216_131838.jpg


The 6 chisels that came with it

IMG_20201216_131848.jpg


I do not know what type they are

IMG_20201216_131854.jpg


Again not sure what they are

IMG_20201216_131908.jpg


They all feel heavy and well made but that is coming from a complete novice.

IMG_20201216_131913.jpg


Again a different angle

IMG_20201216_131922.jpg


Tailstock (I think that's what it is called) I have put that pointed thing in.

IMG_20201216_131928.jpg


End part, note the handle is missing, not sure how this effects anything.

IMG_20201216_131939.jpg


Another pic of the thread

IMG_20201216_132006.jpg


I am assuming this is the face plate

IMG_20201216_132012.jpg


Front or back of faceplate?

My main question is if I screw pic number 5 (1st set of pics onto the chuck it then only manages to screw about half of the depth of the thread on the left hand side thread is this OK or does the chuck need to be screwed all the way on the thread of the machine?
 

Phil Pascoe

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It's an excert - it allows you to use a chuck or faceplate with a different thread. If you wind the jaws out to clean the chuck up a bit, you will find each jaw is numbered - these have to be replaced in the co responding slides in the chuck, which are also numbered. It's good to find out how it fits - you'll wind one or two out sooner or later anyway. When the jaw carriers are out, you will see the spiral that locates them - wind this around until the end appears in No.1 slide, then back it off slightly and insert No.1 jaw. Then turn it on a quarter of a turn and repeat for jaw 2. Repeat for the other two. It sounds more complicated than it is. A dry PTFE spray is good for lubricating the spiral and slides as it doesn't attract dust.
 

Garno

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The numbers. holes and side indents (detents) are for indexing. That is so that you can set up a means by which a 'peg' can locate in either a hole or detent which will aid in marking - or even cutting - lines or grooves along the length of a piece of spindle work or radial ines etc. on face work.

The item marked KP96-E is an insert to convert the mounting from the native 1" x 8 to 3/4" X 16 which you will only need if you have another lathe with the smaller thread.

Thank you that has answered my main concern.

Gary
 

marcros

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Let's take some of the easier questions. The back of the chuck is numbered so you can use an indexing system. Don't worry about it for now, it is a feature that you aren't using.

The cover that you repositioned looks right but I leave mine open. I presume that you also has a top cover and that also stays open on mine.

The chuck seems to have come with an adaptor to thread onto a different sized lathe. Does the church fit the screw directly or need the adaptor?
 

Garno

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It's an excert - it allows you to use a chuck or faceplate with a different thread. If you wind the jaws out to clean the chuck up a bit, you will find each jaw is numbered - these have to be replaced in the co responding slides in the chuck, which are also numbered. It's good to find out how it fits - you'll wind one or two out sooner or later anyway. When the jaw carriers are out, you will see the spiral that locates them - wind this around until the end appears in No.1 slide, then back it off slightly and insert No.1 jaw. Then turn it on a quarter of a turn and repeat for jaw 2. Repeat for the other two. It sounds more complicated than it is. A dry PTFE spray is good for lubricating the spiral and slides as it doesn't attract dust.

I was going to get some WD40 spray or some penetrating oil spray, I will look for your recommendation instead.
 

Garno

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Let's take some of the easier questions. The back of the chuck is numbered so you can use an indexing system. Don't worry about it for now, it is a feature that you aren't using.

The cover that you repositioned looks right but I leave mine open. I presume that you also has a top cover and that also stays open on mine.

The chuck seems to have come with an adaptor to thread onto a different sized lathe. Does the church fit the screw directly or need the adaptor?

Yes I have a top cover that seems to be ok

IMG_20201216_131300.jpg
 

marcros

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When you get going, you will want to change speeds, and these covers need opening every time. That is why I leave mine open.

You will have 5 speeds or so. You start slow and build up, then for sanding may slow down a bit, so it can be a bit of a nuisance openings and closing them.

In the tailstock, you have put the live centre (live means it spins with the work). The missing handle isn't a big thing. If you end up drilling on the lathe (eg for pens you might want to make or buy a replacement.

Faceplate is correct term. You screw your blank to the flat side, then the other side screws onto the lathe.

Do you have any other centres, probably a pointy bit with a sharp cross on it?
 

marcros

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Tools, from the left

Oval skew (slanty one)
Parting tool (pointy)
Round nose scraper
Bowl gouge
Spindle roughing gouge *
Spindle gouge **

*Only ever use it on spindles never bowls
**For now don't consider using it on anything other than spindles.

On the bench below you have a knockout bar which you use to remove any tapered fittings (eg drive centre) in the headstock. This is the long bar with the handle.
 

Garno

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When you get going, you will want to change speeds, and these covers need opening every time. That is why I leave mine open.

You will have 5 speeds or so. You start slow and build up, then for sanding may slow down a bit, so it can be a bit of a nuisance openings and closing them.

In the tailstock, you have put the live centre (live means it spins with the work). The missing handle isn't a big thing. If you end up drilling on the lathe (eg for pens you might want to make or buy a replacement.

Faceplate is correct term. You screw your blank to the flat side, then the other side screws onto the lathe.

Do you have any other centres, probably a pointy bit with a sharp cross on it?

Is this what you mean? it's under the handle of the banjo

IMG_20201216_131346.jpg
 

Garno

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The shed looks this untidy as I'm still making cupboards and such like, hope to finish by February
 

marcros

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That's it, this is your drive centre. It will make more sense when you get your book!
 

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Sheptonphil

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Your chisel set is identical to the set of six I bought when I started seven or eight years ago. today they retail at about £150 the set. They are a really decent starter set, I still use all of them as my go to chisels, especially the skew, it takes a razor edge, and large as it is, I make all my pens with it.

Take your time understanding the purpose of every bit of the kit you’ve acquired. See if you can get an experienced turner round to yours when we’re allowed to show you through the basics at least. Meanwhile you’ve an opportunity to strip stuff apart and clean and lubricate everything. Just use the proper lubricants. You don’t want contaminants getting on wood you intend to clear finish or glue up.

Keep asking the questions, supported by your excellent pictures. You will not be ridiculed for asking because you don’t know.
 

Paul Hannaby

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I think the "spindle lock" on these lathes is a hole in the collar just behind the chuck register into which you insert a 1/4" rod and can brace against the toolrest if it's put in the right place. There's not much chance of something getting stuck in there. using wood between the jaws doesn't really give any advantage over a steel bar and would need something much thicker which means the jaws need to be opened further.
 

OldWood

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I wonder if from your mention of slight rusting, there is rust now between the back face of the chuck and the bush on the spindle - a very effective 'glue', and I am assuming why the plastic washer is recommended. I'm not sure what is on the market now, having given up dismantling old cars many years ago, but I wonder if one the anti-rust products might be worth dribbling into that area and leaving it for a day or two, before assaulting it. Also my gut feeling is to define the 'decent' hammer as a large mallet, rather than a club or joiner's hammer.
I remember dismantling a Reliant Scimitar front suspension long, long ago and fighting all weekend on one side - fortnight later haviing dowsed the other side in something and driven the car around, it fell apart beautifully and was all done in a morning.
Rob
 

mindthatwhatouch

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Can I suggest that you google beginner wood turning projects, or something similar. watch a few videos from recognised, experienced turners and get turning, use some cheap, scrap softwood to practice initially.
Use the roughing gouge and spindle gouge to start, turn between centres and get a feel for making some basic shapes and use of these tools.
It’ll show you how to use the lathe and a couple of tools, from there you can decide what to make.
Don’t forget the PPE. And enjoy.

contact the local woodturners club to see if someone could give you a bit of help over zoom?
 

gmercer_48083

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Garno, This is what you need to hold the shaft from rotating while you smack the chuck counter clockwise (looking from the tailstock)Axminster Woodturning Chuck Removal Spanner There is a hole (no flats) on the shaft. With the spanner installed in the pin hole of the shaft... rotate it so the handle of the spanner is against the casting, open the jaws of the chuck and place a board crossways (as a Lever) then clamp the jaws onto your lever and smack it.
 

Sheptonphil

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Garno, This is what you need to hold the shaft from rotating while you smack the chuck counter clockwise (looking from the tailstock)Axminster Woodturning Chuck Removal Spanner There is a hole (no flats) on the shaft. With the spanner installed in the pin hole of the shaft... rotate it so the handle of the spanner is against the casting, open the jaws of the chuck and place a board crossways (as a Lever) then clamp the jaws onto your lever and smack it.
That spanner is what goes onto the Chuck, not to lock the spindle.

with that, you engage spindle lock (assuming you have one) or put spanner on spindle flats. Put the pin of that tool into the Chuck key hole and give the handle a sharp tap.
 
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