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Storing Woodworking Machinery

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ben2

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Hi

I'm looking for a bit of advice, due to unforeseen circumstances I need to put some of my woodworking gear into storage for probably 6 months.

I'm particularly concerned about the cast iron surfaces going rusty. Other than a coat of light oil, are there any better treatments?

Thanks in advance
 

sunnybob

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Light oil wont last 6 moths (the entire winter) on cast iron unless theyre stored in an air con warehouse.
I have used a spray on called ACF50.
https://www.ebay.co.uk/itm/ACF-50-Anti- ... GTR=1#shId
It was designed for jet aircraft parts to stop them corroding, but is now used for anything that gets weather abuse.
There are others, and youre just about to get a load of recommendations, but when all is said and done, light oil is NOT enough.
 

Inspector

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What you use is dependant on what kind of storage you have to use. In a dry heated building a coat of paste wax is probably enough. In a draughty unheated building by the sea it is going to need a coat of grease or something like Cosmoline. Assuming something in between a corrosion inhibiting lubricant like LPS3 or Boeshield T-9 will do the trick. They come in aerosol cans or as a liquid you can put in a spray bottle.

If you are going to cover the machines to keep the dust off don't use a plastic tarp or sheet as water can condense under them. Use a canvas tarp, cotton sheets or blankets. Corrosion inhibiting paper or plastic work too. I had all my tools and house hold goods packed in two containers and only covered the tops of the machines with anti corrosion plastic and when I took them out 16 months later there was no corrosion on anything but the prairies are a dry climate.

Pete
 

HappyHacker

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If you are storing machinery don't forget the bits that you cannot see, motor shafts, switches, motors, etc. They can also difficult to get anti corrosion stuff on them. Apart from some sort of dehumidifier I have no suggestions other than making sure your storage is dry.
 

ben2

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Thanks for the replies so far.

Everything is being packed into the removers wooden crates, then the whole crate put in one of their (clean and dry) warehouses, I guess with minimal heating, maybe frost protection. Normally more suited to furniture I guess.

The spray looks like a good plan, so I can coat the shafts etc easily as well.

Do dehumidifier bags work, or waste of money?
 

MusicMan

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When I went away for a year I coated cast iron surfaces with fairly thick grease; they were stored in a dry shed but of course its humidity went up and down with the atmosphere.

When I returned - actually seven years later!! - the grease was pretty solid but everything cleaned up and was fine. OTOH I do find that wax needs renewal every month or two in the winter.

Unless you have a power dehumidifier, emptied frequently, I don't think that would last for so long.

So grease is fine, but specialist aircraft stuff might well be better.
 

sunnybob

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I used a dehumidifier bag on a large motorcycle.
Waste of my money
 

Myfordman

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Whatever you do dont wrap it up in plastic sheets. this is a recipe for condensation forming underneath and worse still moisture coming up through the floor in a building with no damp proof membrane. Up on a pallet or baulks of timber will help too.
You need the ability for air to flow around the machines and for them to acclimatise to the diurnal changes in temperature.
Cloth dust sheets should be ok if needed.
Resist the temptation to stack a cardboard box of accessories on the table of a machine. The cardboard will attract moisture and leave a telltale mark forever.
 

wallace

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For bright metal surfaces I've found waxoyle to work really well. I like to cover surfaces with shrink wrap after coating
 

GrahamF

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Myfordman":26q0xw9t said:
Resist the temptation to stack a cardboard box of accessories on the table of a machine. The cardboard will attract moisture and leave a telltale mark forever.
My workshop is an unheated brick garage and we spend 6 - 8 months away each year. On cast iron surfaces, TS, PT, BS, I coat and polish with soft beewax and place sheets of cardboard over, to act as an insulation layer. After several years, no sign of rust or marks anywhere.
 

Myfordman

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Waxoyl is great if you can do it once the machines have been moved. Otherwise it takes a a long while to dry and moving the machines after application is a really messy job.
 

Myfordman

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GrahamF":269g3q9h said:
Myfordman":269g3q9h said:
Resist the temptation to stack a cardboard box of accessories on the table of a machine. The cardboard will attract moisture and leave a telltale mark forever.
My workshop is an unheated brick garage and we spend 6 - 8 months away each year. On cast iron surfaces, TS, PT, BS, I coat and polish with soft beewax and place sheets of cardboard over, to act as an insulation layer. After several years, no sign of rust or marks anywhere.
It is the wax that is saving you from the problem then.

You don't need insulation really, ventilation is the key.
 

sammy.se

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Isn't waxoyl thick black stuff?!? All over your machines??

Nevermind, just saw you can get all types of waxoyl :)
 
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