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Stopping a butchers block top sliding about

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AJB Temple

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I have refurbished an 1886 (it is date stamped and signed) French, very nice commercial butchers block, all solid maple end grain. Having been in storage in a Chateau for over a century it has had minimal use (no dishing) and the sides surrounding the end grain blocks are beautiful birds eye maple. The block is small: about 28 " square and 8" deep, with three compression bars one way and two the other way. I can lift it on my own, but not easily. This is relevant to flipping it.

It is mounted on a frame, probably beech, which I have raised by fitting a bottom board to the legs and four pairs of double, locking wheels, to move it around.
The block is double sided. Having now been refinished and thoroughly mineral oiled, the block will slide easily off the frame. Hence my problem. A heavy block landing on my toesies does not appeal. As it did not previously have wheels, it never moved around. But now, with everything slickly oiled, the top will slide off the stand in a trice. I will use it in my new kitchen every day and it will be rolled around several times a day.

So I am looking for ideas to fix the top in place. I want to be able to flip the top regularly. Hence I would prefer not to use screw in brackets or anything that makes big holes in whichever face is pointing downwards. The block overhangs the frame by about an inch all around so a lip on the frame would be inelegant.

Does anyone have any bright ideas for a solution? I have considered four sharp points poking into the obverse face from the frame, which leaves minimal marks and will probably be sufficient given the weight. Am I missing something obvious? Maybe rubber pads on the frame would be sufficient?
 

MusicMan

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Double-sided tape? hot melt glue? Both are reversible, and can hold firmly enough for machining.
 

AJB Temple

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Didn't think of those. Adhesives may be a problem on a mineral oiled surface, but definitely worth a try. Thanks.
 

Orraloon

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Some of the non slip mesh you can find in the kitchenware isle of the supermarket. Cut to size and job done. Has hundreds of other applications about the house and shed.
Regards
John
 

sunnybob

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Just build a lip around the edges of the stand. Doesnt need to be more than half inch proud and you can still lift the block over it.
 

Tris

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Screw a piece of angle iron to each corner of the frame so it sticks up by 15mm or so, fettle to suit your block. That's how our commercial ones used to be held on the frame.
Tris
 

AJB Temple

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Thanks all. The lip / angle iron idea does not work. The block is larger than the table it stands on. And aesthetically it does not get approval from my wife.

I have ordered some non slip pads and will given them a try.

Adrian
 

--Tom--

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If you can’t have anything coming up the sides your options are constrained to increasing friction. Either increase the surface area of contact or use something grippy
 

AJB Temple

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I took Percy's advice and bought some anti slip pads off Bezos. Fitted 8 pads on the top of the four legs and they seem to be working.
 
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