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Starting to Design a Router Table

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Hutzul

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Why does the router table top nearly always have the router central?
What is your idea of what is best? I guess there is no definitive answer ?
I plan to make a hinged top to make router cutter alterations easier, and have also bought a Trend Insert Plate for this project.

I plan to make some drawers for starters, suspended on a simple shop made rail.
I have all my materials now, and will be making RT1 (router table mk1) when I get back from my hols.

Any advice on whether to centralize OR offset the cutter would be welcome.

Cheers guys !! =D>

PS. My earlier post on Planer/Thicknesser is now resolved, I got a great deal from our very own Andycase, many thanks ! =D>
 

marcros

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they tend to be central, but there is no real reason that they have to be- there are certainly many that are not. I guess that the advantage of central is that for a fixed board size,, you maximise both infeed and outfield support, rather than having more of one at the expense of the other. It also depends on where it is located- tight against a wall and plate at the back makes it impossible to put a dado in the middle of a board.
 

Hutzul

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marcros":2zura7o1 said:
they tend to be central, but there is no real reason that they have to be- there are certainly many that are not. I guess that the advantage of central is that for a fixed board size,, you maximise both infeed and outfield support, rather than having more of one at the expense of the other. It also depends on where it is located- tight against a wall and plate at the back makes it impossible to put a dado in the middle of a board.
Good point, thanks Marcros !
 

condeesteso

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I would say offset the cutter axis about 1/3rd from a long side of the top. If you use tracks inset into the top for a fence, you can flip the fence to the opposite table side and get a lot more support for larger pieces then. Central is actually a bad idea I think. So if it is say 500mm front to back, centre the cutter about 170 in from back.
 

Hutzul

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condeesteso":17f8omba said:
I would say offset the cutter axis about 1/3rd from a long side of the top. If you use tracks inset into the top for a fence, you can flip the fence to the opposite table side and get a lot more support for larger pieces then. Central is actually a bad idea I think. So if it is say 500mm front to back, centre the cutter about 170 in from back.
Thanks condeesteso, I was thinking along the same lines. My top will be about 40" L x 24" deep, sub base is 3/4" mdf, with 150mm x 15mm conti board top which will be butted up to tee track initially to see if it works out ok.
So I guess the router centre will be 8" from the back, until someone persuades me otherwise ?

Another idea I had was for a removable fence extension, so when routing boards in upright position it would provide more stability ? Though I was thinking of a sled that the workpiece could be clamped to as an alternative ?

I have searched on our site & there's quite a lot of info, but nothing quite recent that I can see.

Anyone know where I can get a template for a clamping knob please ? Something that looks and feels right in your hand ? Get the innuendo out of your head please :roll: #-o (hammer)
 

The Bear

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On the Wealdon website Ron Fox goes through building a router table in stages. Def worth a read. I'm pretty sure his is well off centre with regard to infeed and outfeed sides

Mark
 

condeesteso

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re the vertical boards, working on edges, a common solution is a 'bridge' type of jig / fence. A sheet of mdf forms the fence, and 2 legs are fixed to back with clearance to get over the main fence, then the base of the legs sits on the top. It's easy to make and to tweak until it is dead vertical (make the feet a mil too long, then shave until vertical). In fact it's probably the various jigs that make a router table really versatile and accurate. Another I use is silly-basic. 2 bits of 12mm mdf, fixed into one (24mm thick). Cut dead square on the tablesaw (checked too with squares so it is accurate) - makes a very good simple guide for end-grain, narrow longer pieces etc. There are many more jigs of course, and they tend to gather as you go.
 

Hutzul

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eribaMotters":1hgftprw said:
Hutzul,
not sure if this will help, but you will find a few photos here of one I made last year.
post649657.html#p649657

Colin
Looks really good Colin, I might nick an idea or 2 from you =P~

condeesteso":1hgftprw said:
re the vertical boards, working on edges, a common solution is a 'bridge' type of jig / fence. A sheet of mdf forms the fence, and 2 legs are fixed to back with clearance to get over the main fence, then the base of the legs sits on the top. It's easy to make and to tweak until it is dead vertical (make the feet a mil too long, then shave until vertical). In fact it's probably the various jigs that make a router table really versatile and accurate. Another I use is silly-basic. 2 bits of 12mm mdf, fixed into one (24mm thick). Cut dead square on the tablesaw (checked too with squares so it is accurate) - makes a very good simple guide for end-grain, narrow longer pieces etc. There are many more jigs of course, and they tend to gather as you go.
Very clever, I plan to try your idea asap, thanks =D>
 

devonwoody

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The waste that goes down the tube I find is a nuisance, a good waste delivery system I think would be nice.
 

Hutzul

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devonwoody":fjjf31bu said:
The waste that goes down the tube I find is a nuisance, a good waste delivery system I think would be nice.
Aha !! I have a cunning plan !! :evil: I got a Henry vac & his bigger sister, a wet & dry vac, for a starter. Then I will connect a drum between the vac & table, to collect the large woodchips. A local company have a damaged dust collector which I hope to rescue for next to nowt, this is plan B :lol:
I will have to work something out, because my dog is a sawdust magnet . #-o
 
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