Quantcast
  • We invite you to join UKWorkshop.
    Members can turn off viewing Ads!

Stanley Bailey No6 With corrugated Sole

UKworkshop.co.uk

Help Support UKworkshop.co.uk:

Dickymint

Established Member
Joined
26 Apr 2005
Messages
79
Reaction score
0
Location
Bournemouth
Heloo(sic) all,

A question to the conoscenti, what do you think about this bench plane?

Stanley Bailey No6 With corrugated Sole

Thanks for you tireless feedback,

Love "n" kisses etc, Dicky
 

Alf

Established Member
Joined
22 Oct 2003
Messages
12,079
Reaction score
0
Location
Up the proverbial creek
A tiny bit wide open as a question, Dicky... :lol: Old or New? Some people love the #6 size, others don't. I'm one of the latter, so not much help here. Corrugations are unknown to me as well; I would expect a number of North American members can speak on them from experience though. There, no help at all; that was predictable... :roll:

Cheers, Alf
 

MikeW

Established Member
Joined
15 Apr 2005
Messages
1,933
Reaction score
0
Location
Forest Grove, Oregon USA
Hi Dicky,

Not just to be a contrarian :eek: . Personally I like corrugated soles. With that said, though, Alf asks a good question, old or new? If newer, look for another if you can wait.

Be aware that on thinner stock it is difficult to impossible to shoot an edge if the plane's sole is corrugated.

As for the size of the #6, some people (aside from maybe smaller planes too) have a 4 and a 5, skip 6 and have either a 7 or 8 (or both). I have a 6 skipped 7 and have an 8.

My purchases were ones of opportunity at the time. I don't think, depending on what you intend to do with the plane, it matters.
 

ydb1md

Established Member
Joined
6 Apr 2005
Messages
634
Reaction score
0
Location
Maryland
I've got a 3c and I, personally, don't like the corrugations. I don't think I'd buy a jack or larger plane w/ corrugations because it makes edge planing or jointing more difficult. Manufacturers should advocate some sort of sole lubricant rather than machining grooves in the iron.
 

MikeW

Established Member
Joined
15 Apr 2005
Messages
1,933
Reaction score
0
Location
Forest Grove, Oregon USA
ydb1md":s8jt4uqc said:
I've got a 3c and I, personally, don't like the corrugations. I don't think I'd buy a jack or larger plane w/ corrugations because it makes edge planing or jointing more difficult. Manufacturers should advocate some sort of sole lubricant rather than machining grooves in the iron.
That's why one needs more than one of each plane size :lol:

Seriously, hype aside, I do find that for initial flattening the corrugations work better--that is, without the need for waxing. It also gets used for flattening green boards I cut from fruit trees I cut myself (such as apple) prior to stickering them. I guarantee it is extremely difficult to do with a flat bottom soled plane because of the pitch and wetness (suction).

I have a #6 with corrugations, an old Sargent with a stout replacement blade. I also have a LV #6. It is set for a finer cut and I use it for shooting long board edges and smoothing large panels.

But of the bench planes, the #605 probably gets used for shooting most edges as it fit the size of work I prefer to do. Then there are the #95s for final passes on board edges to ensure they are square to a face...and then...Oh gosh, I've totally slid down the slope...

So you see, Dicky, more than one opinion concerning corrugations. I would say that if you are only going to have one plane in the longer bench plane sizes, skip the corrugations. Skip the #6 too and go for a #7, depending on the work you do.
 

ydb1md

Established Member
Joined
6 Apr 2005
Messages
634
Reaction score
0
Location
Maryland
MikeW":1bozjohn said:
Then there are the #95s for final passes on board edges to ensure they are square to a face...
How easy is the #95 to use? I've looked longingly at the offering by Veritas but the only review that I've read wasn't very positive. I've tried the Veritas jointer fence and it does the job but the dedicated edge planes seem so much more elegant. The jointer fence takes a lot of concentration to keep your force applied to the proper axis(s) -- consistent downward force so as to keep the edge straight, force to keep the fence against the board face but not so much as to pop the fence off of the plane etc . . .
 

Alf

Established Member
Joined
22 Oct 2003
Messages
12,079
Reaction score
0
Location
Up the proverbial creek
I must confess, I've never understood the point of the #95. You joint an edge, right? You use a nice long plane in order to get it straight. Then you take an itty bitty short plane to get the edge at 90 degs. Where's the sense in that? :? Takes twice as long as doing it all with the jointer and surely you run the risk of fouling up your straight edge? Can someone explain it to me, 'cos it worries me when I don't feel I can justify every plane in the book... 8-[ :lol: Unless it's one of those tools for people who joint with a straight blade edge, in which case that probably explains the need... :wink:

Cheers, Alf
 

Chris Knight

Established Member
Joined
14 Jan 2004
Messages
6,641
Reaction score
3
Location
SE London - NW Kent
Years ago, the 95 was the first special purpose plane I acquired because I had trouble getting a right angle and thought it would help. It does up to a point but there is a distinct knack to using it, you have to set up the blade very carefully and it is really at its best on thin material like drawer sides.

A jointer with a fence (I use a nice Millers Falls one on my long planes) is much better and easier to use for material in the usual "furniture thicknesses" (typically 3/4 to one inch thick). Or as Alf suggests, a cambered blade in a jointer plus a bit of practice beats it except on very thin material.
 

MikeW

Established Member
Joined
15 Apr 2005
Messages
1,933
Reaction score
0
Location
Forest Grove, Oregon USA
Why do I love thee #95, let me count the ways...

For work that is longish, I *generally* don't use the #95s. But, being the inconsistent sort, I do sometimes. As long as the pieces I do use them on are not part of an edge-to-edge glue-up I typically use them for final dressing of the edge.

But, there are times I do use them to take a slight high spot down on glue-ups in order to get the boards to fit properly. I find them easier than say a block plane or a #3 in such a usage.

I do use them to shoot short pieces, boxes (jewelry, keepsake, storage boxes). I use them sometime to dress an edge of lumber from the pile to quickly see the grain run-out.

I use them sometimes when I am trimming a top or bottom of a mitered box that may have slipped a little during glue-up (just this morning) all the while maintaining a square edge (they are capable of an extremely fine cut).

Oh, there are other ways I love thee, #95...
 
A

Anonymous

Guest
Alf":2od2os1w said:
I must confess, I've never understood the point of the #95. You joint an edge, right? You use a nice long plane in order to get it straight. Then you take an itty bitty short plane to get the edge at 90 degs. Where's the sense in that? :? Takes twice as long as doing it all with the jointer and surely you run the risk of fouling up your straight edge? Can someone explain it to me, 'cos it worries me when I don't feel I can justify every plane in the book... 8-[ :lol: Unless it's one of those tools for people who joint with a straight blade edge, in which case that probably explains the need... :wink:

Cheers, Alf
People who use jointers (straight blades) can match plane edges and don't need anything else. I think the #95 is for cleaning up the small dip left by a try plane with a cambered iron. :lol:

Now. back to the original thread. I'm starting to warm up to the #6 plane. I still reach for #5, #5 1/2, #7, & #8 sizes more often but that is from force of habit.

Corrugated soles are easier to flatten than smooth soles and that is about all the difference there is to me. I use corrugated and smooth sole planes in roughly equal amounts and haven't developed a preference for either in use. I don't feel there is any problem using a corrugated sole on thin edged stock because the corrugations do not run the full length of the sole. The toe, mouth, and heel are smooth and at least two of the are on the work at all times unless the plane is skewed and if the plane is skewed the corrugations don't follow the edge.

So there you have it. All kinds of opinions on the #6 and on corrugations. The definitive answer is: You'll have to decide for yourself what you like. Hang on that answer because it is reusable :lol: .
 

Midnight

Established Member
Joined
11 Oct 2003
Messages
1,805
Reaction score
0
Location
Scotland
Unless it's one of those tools for people who joint with a straight blade edge
ummmm.... I do... straight edge blade that is... and I don't need one o them edge squaring thingies neither... but then, I'm weird (apparently), don't use the jointer on edges neither...
 

Alf

Established Member
Joined
22 Oct 2003
Messages
12,079
Reaction score
0
Location
Up the proverbial creek
MikeW":11l7cge2 said:
Why do I love thee #95, let me count the ways...
<snippage>
Oh, there are other ways I love thee, #95...
So Mike, I'm not quite clear on this. Are you saying you like it or not...? :lol:

Cheers, Alf
 

MikeW

Established Member
Joined
15 Apr 2005
Messages
1,933
Reaction score
0
Location
Forest Grove, Oregon USA
Alf":2sv0t5t7 said:
...So Mike, I'm not quite clear on this. Are you saying you like it or not...? :lol:
Cheers, Alf
I blame the meds on the silly outbreak. I mean, two "literary" (and I do mean that loosely) references in as many days!

Maybe it's time to switch medications again...

And besides, I gotta make do with what tools I have...even if that means using such a senseless purchase :). Might as well like 'em...
 

Latest posts

Top