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GEPPETTO

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Hi All,

sometime ago I asked some advices about the restoration of old table with a long crack upon.
Well I am coming to do it. I must do a groove to inlay new wood in, and I thought to do it with a router like Stanley 71.
I saw some types, but because my little experience I don't know if the item is complete or it's without some pieces.
If someone well know that tool, could light me about parts and use.

Many thanks in advance
 

Alf

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Parts and history here. Manual here (PDF file, about 82Kb). Use? Erm, well the usual sharp cutters etc. Practice first, to get the hang of it, but it's reasonably straight forward.

Cheers, Alf
 

GEPPETTO

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Thanks Alf,

but if router works only for surfacing the bottom of grooves or other depressions parallel to the surface of the work, I must have sawed the walls of the future groove, before. :roll: :oops:

Which tools do I have to use? A back saw? :oops: :lol: or perhaps e dado plane which I don't have ? mmhh.. if I wold have a dado I could do entirely the groove... :?: :?:

..I'm il loop :oops: ...................
 

MikeW

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Hi Gabriele,

There are a few methods to do this. Actually, there are a bunch, here are a few.

One, you could clean up the crack with a chisel and fill it with epoxy. You can mix colors into the epoxy if desired, you can also fill the crack up nearly to the top *after* sufacing the topside to nearly final deminsion and then, after the first epoxy has dried, use the sanding dust from the wood itself to mix into fresh epoxy and fill to the surface.

Second, you can use a chisel to cut the space needed to inlay a fresh piece of the wood. Try for a shape that you would not have too much trouble in cutting a new piece of wood to fill. In other words, as stright of a "dado" as possible, even if the crack is not straight the dado housing can be. This should be epoxied in for strength. The dado should be drawn out on the surface and you would need to try to cut as flat a bottom as possible.

Work your way out to the line, but stay a little from it. Once the dado is nearly even, then you can cut to the line in your final slices. Try for cuts at this point that are straight down at the line. To make the flat bottom you would turn the chisel so the bevel is down to flaten the bottom. IF you had a #71, this is when you would use it, to clean up the bottom to the same depth, but it isn't a necessary tool for this repair.

Then you would cut a piece to inlay slightly larger and using a plane or chisel or sandpaper slowly make it fit the dado. Pay attention to the grain and try to match the repair as good as possible.

Third, which could be heresy here in the handtool forum, would be to use an electric router with guides clamped to the top to make sure the router doesn't cut where you don't want it to. You would need to make several passes with the router, lowering the bit a little after each pass.

All three of the methods should be done after most leveling of the top is done.
 

GEPPETTO

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Hi MikeW,

OK. But if I don't want to fill the crack with epoxy and I wish to choose for the second way, if I have understood well (my strange language is very poor), I could cut the walls of the groove only with a chisel. Is it true? And when you say of a "dado", do you refer at a groove or a dado plane? :oops:
One idea.. I could cut the groove in a V shape. It would be more easy by hand. What do you think about??


Many thanks
 

MikeW

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Hi again, Gabriele.

Yes, you can cut the groove with only a chisel.

I mean the same thing when I wrote "dado" instead of "groove."

A V shape can be just fine to do. Whether the groove has straight sides or is in the shape of a V, cut the shape into a piece of cardboard or a thin piece of plywood to ensure both the groove and piece to patch the groove will fit together well.

You are very welcome.
 
A

Anonymous

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A simple, easily made tool called a "scratch stock" works well for cutting grooves for inlay.
Bugbear has written some good information here.
If the crack is near an edge of the table, the simple L shaped stock would work. If the crack is away from any edges, you would need to modify the stock to run against a guide clamped to the table top.
 

GEPPETTO

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Roger Nixon":2pgahvmk said:
A simple, easily made tool called a "scratch stock" works well for cutting grooves for inlay.
Bugbear has written some good information here.
If the crack is near an edge of the table, the simple L shaped stock would work. If the crack is away from any edges, you would need to modify the stock to run against a guide clamped to the table top.
mmmmmhhh, it's a very fine idea. I could try to do a strock with a V shape blade.
I'll do myself alive in future. :lol:
Thanks
 
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