Stained glass panels

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Oaktree11

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Hi all,
I have been given 8 of these stained glass panels, taken from a bay window in a Victorian house.
I have a plan to build a window incorporating the stained glass panels but not the frames. So, the question is how to remove the panels from the frames Without damaging them. This one already has a broken glass but the other 7 are perfect. This one will be the test piece.
They are puttied in and it’s rock hard.
my initial thoughts are to cut the frame off as close to the edge of the panels as I can with a track saw and go from there.
Any help welcome and thanks
John
 

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DBC

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I‘d just do it the same as you would if you were replacing a pane while the window was still in a building. Carefully remove the old putty with a sharp chisel and maybe run a stanley knife around the perimeter of the glass from both sides when this is done to break any seal. Beware you may damage these blades though as there is probably glazing ponts or brads buried in the putty. Start in the middle of the rebate and work towards the corners. Even if the putty is very hard is shouldn’t take more than about 25 minutes per window.
 

Jacob

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Yes cut/destroy the frame. Removing whatever remains is often easier than you expect. I used to cut through each corner and see it the frame pieces could be tapped away from the glass. If necessary cut more away.
 

Oaktree11

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Thanks for the replies. I think that trying to chip the putty away is higher risk than cutting the frame off because the putty is so hard and because the glass is not smooth and has the lead ridges, it won’t be easy to get a blade under it.
I am going to try the tracksaw, being mindful of the fact that there might be brads. It’s time I changed the blade anyway so I am not too worried.
I will report back!
John
 

Alwyn

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You need a hacking knife which has a thick blade which can be hit with hammer. Old putty should be ok to break out; it has worked for me over the years. The more likely damage is likely to be old lead joints on the glass if you bend or flex the pane. Re soldering bad joints not too difficult with decent soldering iron, solder and wax.
 

Jacob

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I've rarely successfuly used a hacking knife and tend to see it as a choice between saving the glass or the frame, but not both. In spite if useful vids like this one
 

Oaktree11

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Yes cut/destroy the frame. Removing whatever remains is often easier than you expect. I used to cut through each corner and see it the frame pieces could be tapped away from the glass. If necessary cut more away.
Jacob, you were quite right. The remaining putty just snaps off see update below
 

Oaktree11

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Ok, I have done the first one and it was really successful. I think, with resistance I could have hacked the putty out but the panels are deeply recessed and I don’t think there is any way I would have got them out without destroying the frame.
As it happens, there is a lot of woodworm in the frames, not obvious from outside.
so, I cut all 4 sides close to the edge of the putty and when they were all cut it was a simple job to pull the rest apart.
Thanks to all for contributing, I appreciate it.
 

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Oaktree11

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Just as a supplementary question, what is the best way to clean the remnants of old putty from the lead which is generally in good mechanical condition?
thanks
john
 

PDW125

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Just as a supplementary question, what is the best way to clean the remnants of old putty from the lead which is generally in good mechanical condition?
thanks
john

Sharp chisel or knife, but don’t cut too deep. The cames will be quite soft so you may actually find it easier to remove the outer one and fit new ones and resolder the edges which will give you a cleaner finish and easier to use when you re-frame the glass.

Gomms channel on YouTube is good for advice on stained glass

 

deema

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Chip it off, or depending how thick it is, gently warm it which makes it soft, or dunk / smother in linseed oil and leave overnight which softens it.
 

deema

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You can get stained glass panels triple glazed which makes living with them far easier. The purists get a bit excited, but faced with a choice of draughty / mould growth in the leading even after regrouting and leaking heat almost as fast as not having a window I went for triple glazing with all of mine. I live in a converted chapel.
 

niall Y

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Just as a supplementary question, what is the best way to clean the remnants of old putty from the lead which is generally in good mechanical condition?
thanks
john
Paint stripper will soften putty. After all it is little more than heavily pigmented linseed oil paint
 

DRC

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Sharp chisel or knife, but don’t cut too deep. The cames will be quite soft so you may actually find it easier to remove the outer one and fit new ones and resolder the edges which will give you a cleaner finish and easier to use when you re-frame the glass.

Gomms channel on YouTube is good for advice on stained glass

Hi, John if you need some help with replacing the broken glass panel my wife is a stained glass artist so feel free to ask me to forward any questions you may have to her good luck .
 

Oaktree11

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Hi, John if you need some help with replacing the broken glass panel my wife is a stained glass artist so feel free to ask me to forward any questions you may have to her good luck .
Thank you very much for this. John
You can get stained glass panels triple glazed which makes living with them far easier. The purists get a bit excited, but faced with a choice of draughty / mould growth in the leading even after regrouting and leaking heat almost as fast as not having a window I went for triple glazing with all of mine. I live in a converted chapel.
i have been thinking of doing something like that. Maybe not triple glazed but behind glass. The window I am going to replace is below. I am thinking that I might somehow re use the glass as an outer shield. It’s a single glazed upvc unit that I reclaimed when I built the workshop
1655567820479.jpeg
 

Jacob

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I'd have DG outside and stained glass inside as secondary glazing, hinged with access to cleaning both faces.
 

deema

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I would definitely not create a double glazed panel with one of the panels being the stained glass, they are not air tight. @Jacob solution is a great way forward if you have the frame depth, otherwise triple glazing the double glazed panel had been for me a superb solution.
 
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