Spray kit recommendations ( walls and cabinets )

UKworkshop.co.uk

Help Support UKworkshop.co.uk:

MikeJhn

Grunkel
Joined
2 Sep 2014
Messages
4,615
Reaction score
415
Location
Kent
Sorry if you've already mentioned this elsewhere MikeJhn, but which tip do you use for emulsion?
All accords to manufacturer and the viscosity of their particular product, you will have to experiment with a bit of dilution, don't try to spray emulsion without dilution it will splatter everywhere, also do ensure its filtered, I used to filter at least twice on all finish's. In the end I never used a viscosity cup, far too messy, the feel of the paint should be somewhat like single cream, try, dilute more or less and try again, I would hang a bit of cardboard on the barn door and just try it out until I found the correct dilution, them indelibly write what I found on the paint tin.

The splatter shown in your post should not happen at all, I would suggest the paint was not mixed properly, you can't just constantly say I was in a bit of a rush, spraying correctly takes time and effort, give yourself a break and slow down.

The bubbles on the pine test piece may be contaminates on the timber, all timber needs at least a wipe down with a tac rag and a bit of de-contaminating and sanding before spraying.
 
Last edited:

Baball

Established Member
Joined
6 Feb 2019
Messages
48
Reaction score
29
Location
South Yorkshire
All accords to manufacturer and the viscosity of their particular product, you will have to experiment with a bit of dilution, don't try to spray emulsion without dilution it will splatter everywhere, also do ensure its filtered, I used to filter at least twice on all finish's. In the end I never used a viscosity cup, far too messy, the feel of the paint should be somewhat like single cream, try, dilute more or less and try again, I would hang a bit of cardboard on the barn door and just try it out until I found the correct dilution, them indelibly write what I found on the paint tin.

The splatter shown in your post should not happen at all, I would suggest the paint was not mixed properly, you can't just constantly say I was in a bit of a rush, spraying correctly takes time and effort, give yourself a break and slow down.

The bubbles on the pine test piece may be contaminates on the timber, all timber needs at least a wipe down with a tac rag and a bit of de-contaminating and sanding before spraying.
Thanks MikeJhn. This time around hasn't been rushed at all; I've been experimenting for a few hours and used a lot of card and scrap, but it seems any combination of tip (1.4 and 1.8mm)/air/paint settings and technique doesn't eliminate the splatter. That would point to the paint maybe being the issue.

I've also been trying to learn the consistency rather than just use the viscosity cup and have been aiming for the paint to not leave any 'worms' on the surface when running off the silicon stirring stick. This approach worked well with the Zinsser and I didn't measure it in the cup at all after getting used to the consistency.

This paint has been thinned 20% and still looks a bit thick, is it normal to thin more than that? The only information I can find from Johnstones just says 'it can be sprayed' and that a first coat on new plaster should be thinned 10%. I can't find anything about limits to thinning.

I noticed as I filtered it into the spray gun that it almost looked like it was separating into its constituent colours, so you could be right about it not being mixed sufficiently also being an issue.

Next steps I guess would be to filter it again and try thinning further.
 

MikeJhn

Grunkel
Joined
2 Sep 2014
Messages
4,615
Reaction score
415
Location
Kent
If it looks as though its separating when being poured, then its definitely not mixed sufficiently, How old is this paint?

I would try spaying the paint without thinning and work up from there, one other thought is are you spraying with the gun upright or inclined, it could be the non return valve is full of paint, do you have the guard in place on the bottom of the gun to help prevent this, and a filter on the feed pipe in the gun?
 

Tony Works Wood

Established Member
Joined
29 Dec 2021
Messages
30
Reaction score
31
Location
UK
Hi H-Magic.
I've used my vintage Aerograph (DeVilbiss) pressure pots for large areas and small areas including walls, boats, furniture and small
single components since 1983. They have been very versatile with little outlay apart from the usual wear and tear. I got them out of
a skip/dumpster back in 1983 when the firm I once worked changed to Kremlin air assisted pumps. I thought about changing but a
lot of outlay at the time. Pots aren't temperamental and are easier to clean if contaminated. That's why I still have them today. Tony
 

Sheptonphil

Scrumpy junkie
Joined
29 Dec 2012
Messages
1,244
Reaction score
415
Location
Somerset
I've currently got a gun and comp. Set up, but if my comp. dies I'll be looking at the Graco gxff, I've heard allot of good things about it from various people
I’ve just finished redecorating a large 4 bed where all the ceilings were plastered over artex. All ceilings mist coated, then three coats neat emulsion, every wall white emulsioned before final 2 top coats of coloured. This using the Graco GXFF. A superb piece of kit, 12x25ft ceiling, mist coat 4 minutes, 5 minutes per finish coat. Wall areas same time. With a dust sheet can be used in redecorating occupied rooms fir ceilings, but top coats on walks all done with roller.

I’d never sell the Graco.
 
Top