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marcros

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I would like to buy a round bottommed spokeshave. what would be the best bet to start with?

my first instinct was a Stanley or record, but Stanley do a few different ones- adjustable and non adjustable. Preston ones are a bit more, but are prettier. Then I realise that I don't know what I should be looking for.

budget needs to be sensible, it doesn't stretch to Clifton (sadly), LN or LV.
 

Droogs

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Why not just see if you can find some old wood ones for pennies and use them the secret is to keep the blade lower at one end and this allows you to vary the cut with practice
 

worn thumbs

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I have used a few Stanleys and don't really recommend the adjustable versions.If you must have one,the malleable version is the better.The non-adjustable,which I believe is the model 63,is variable according to age and a good one is a superb tool.I had one that I bought in the mid seventies that was just about perfect and then it dropped onto a concrete floor and a handle broke off.I had the best welder I knew braze it back together and it was OK but never again as good.So I bought a new one and that was a complete waste of time and money.Somebody had decided to "improve" the shape and had removed the finger grips in the underside of the handles.I have used it for about ten minutes in the eleven years I have owned the thing.I bought a further three or four from ebay and finally got one that felt right.Yet I still pick up the oldest,repaired version,most of the time and look on the others as a source of spare parts.The offerings from the boutique makers are probably quite good,but then, at their prices they should be.
 

Pete Maddex

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Preston ones are better than the Stanley/Record ones, but the best one is the Millard Falls cigar shave, good examples are expensive but well worth it.

Pete
 

Hornbeam

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I have always found the wooden ones better, I find them more comfortable and I think the blade angle is much better.
When you say you are looking for a round bottomed spokeshave, Do you mean one with a curved blade ore one with a curved sole
Ian
 

marcros

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curved sole, so that I can do internal curves without it bottomming out. I might get a wooden one or two, they are cheap enough and if I dont like it then the search can continue.
 

Cheshirechappie

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Another possibility - albeit not a cheap one - is to start with a new blade and make a wooden shave to suit needs. Ron Hock makes two sizes of blade for wooden shaves, and there may be other makers.

https://www.classichandtools.com/acatal ... l#SID=1522

I've not tried this, but I suspect the trick is to install the blade such that there is a clearance angle between the bottom of the blade and the workpiece at the smallest curvature intended, and keep that curvature on the sole of the body as large a radius as possible.

In all honesty, slightly shaping the sole of a second hand wooden shave would be a more cost effective solution, I think!

I have one curved sole (metal) shave, and it's definitely a tricky beast, requiring the sort of control of cutting angle you'd expect to use with a drawknife, but without the benefit of the handles at right angles to the blade. I find I need quite a firm grip, and careful wrist angling to keep it cutting. Shallow depth of cut helps, as does tractable timber. It's not a tool I 'like' using, if I'm honest. I find rasps and files a better bet for tightish curves.
 

marcros

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I hadnt thought if reshaping the wooden sole either actually. I will get a couple of wooden ones and have a play around. I have a rasp or two and a drawknife so something to compare with.
 

richarddownunder

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Hi...I have a Stanley 65 (as well as a 51 and 151). I have found it fine for use on guitar necks and so-on. I worked on the soles (none of the original castings weren't that good) and figured out how to sharpen them (which I think is the biggest challenge with spokeshaves) and they now all perform pretty well. However, if I was going to buy one (to keep for life) and hadn't already restored these 3, I'd get a Clifton and have done with it.

Cheers
Richard
 

richarddownunder

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Well, blow me down. My 65 isn't what I thought it was. It a chamfer spokeshave missing the chamfer bits (sadly, as it would have been quite valuable with em) - from the Sweatheart era. Looking at it again, it is quite nicely made, better than my other 2 Stanleys. It does the job on guitar necks . Has anyone else used one of these?
Cheers
Richard
 

Hornbeam

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Another possibility - albeit not a cheap one - is to start with a new blade and make a wooden shave to suit needs. Ron Hock makes two sizes of blade for wooden shaves, and there may be other makers.

I made 2 of these last year one of which I did with a removable front section so I could have a curved and a flat version simply by changing the front
 

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richarddownunder

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Pete Maddex":1ygn3ymb said:
Preston ones are better than the Stanley/Record ones, but the best one is the Millard Falls cigar shave, good examples are expensive but well worth it.

Pete
Looking up the Milllars falls I wondered how on earth you'd sharpen it, then found this discussion. Might be of interest as I'm stuffed if i could free-hand sharpen something like this without a jig. https://sawmillcreek.org/showthread.php ... to-sharpen .
Cheers
Richard
 

AndyT

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That's handy, but there's no need to leave this very forum for a complete pictorial guide from Jimi Hendricks

post660915.html

Incidentally, if anyone wants a real rarity to search for, try to find the Moore and Wright version of the Millers Falls design. I've seen a couple on eBay but never in the flesh.
 
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