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colinc

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I'm looking at spindle moulders at the moment as I have some larger joinery projects I want to tackle. Anyone have any pointers to offer?
 

RogerS

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Thought I'd bump this :lol: as I am after the same information.

What are the key things to look for? Tilting table? power feed?

Looking for spindle moulder 101, i guess!

Cheers

Roger
 

jasonB

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It all depends on what you want to do with it. Mine is part of a combination machine and really only has the power for a 40mm block.

If you are running large mouldings then a more powerfull machine would obviously be better as it will take 50mm blocks, cill blocks etc and is what you need for external doors and windows. The power feed takes the strain of feeding lots of timber through the machine.

Not seen one with a tilting table, but better ones have a tilting spindle which makes them more versotile. It is also possible to get ones with interchangable spindles so that you can use the same machine with router bits.

If you are likely to be doing tennons or a lot of profile & scribe work then a sliding carrage is a big advantage.

The HSS cutters don't last long on MDF for which you really need carbide tooling and deep pockets.

Jason
 

RogerS

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Jason

Many thanks. My choice will be a standalone machine.

Really good point re 40mm vs 50mm ...it will be for doors/windows and so your point was very timely.

My mistake...I meant a tilting spindle (whatever that is/does :oops: )

I'll stick to the router table and so won't need interchangeable spindles ...unless I'm missing something else?

Sliding carriage...good point again, thanks
 

Scrit

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Roger Sinden":ux6dwf8q said:
Really good point re 40mm vs 50mm ...it will be for doors/windows and so your point was very timely.
Part of the issue is also whether or not your motor has enough power to run steel block as opposed to aluminium ones. In part this is a braking issue. If you are going to do a full size door you might be better looking for a machine with a sliding table section or to which you can add a tenoning table - this raises the work above the table and allows you to use tenoning discs which can give you a 100mm deep scribed frame/muntin, although the disc size is generally about 250mm to achieve this. Felderman has gone down this route and I'm sure he could proffer some useful experiences/advice.

One way to get a variety of smaller (kitchen) door profiles is to go for a block such as the Freud 2000 which has 18 or so sets of carbide tipped tools. Downside is the price - circa £400

Power feeders are used in trade shops because the do away with the need for a Shaw guard. Great for production and allow manouvers such as climb (reverse) milling.

Roger Sinden":ux6dwf8q said:
I'll stick to the router table and so won't need interchangeable spindles ...unless I'm missing something else?
One of the few machines to offer this is the Felder - allows you to run router bits at about 15,000 rpm (?) so no good for small diameter cutters but an ideal intermediate step if you want to use router panel raisers, etc.

Scrit
 

ProShop

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Felder..... did someone mention Felder :D :D .

You'll be looking at one of these then :D Here.

I have the saw/spindle combo and will easily power the bigger steel blocks that Scrit describes in his post. Especially if your into big items like doors & windows.

I can certainly recommend a power feeder as you can control the quality of the profile/moulding being cut.

And the tilting spindle machines are worth their weight in gold as they bring another dimension to quite a lot of cutter blocks & profile cutters. IMHO the rear tilting spindles works best as they are more versatile & don't restrict the guarding and power feeder.

Last week I had 6 3ft X 6ft 6ins solid doors to rebate for a disabled persons bungalow & I just put them straight onto the sliding carriage & outrigger table & bingo, done in just a few minutes.

I also have the router spindle which turns the whole machine into the biggest/ easiest, accurate (most expensive :roll:) router table you've ever seen.
 

The Restorer

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Hey Felderman, you've been spending some dosh on some very desirable accecories for your machine :shock: Are they any good?

I too have a Felder (this time full combi) and agree it's Spindle Moulder is fantastic and has some excellent features such as the reverse tilting spindle, forward and reverse motors, 4hp, masses of accesories and tooling, accuracy beyond belief (1/10th mm), memory set for the fence (means you take the fence of and replace it and dial in it's position to aid set up time).

If you're looking for trade use try Felder, SCM, Sedgwick. But be warned, they ain't cheap :shock:

If you want hobby look at the Scheppach.

If your still flinching at the prices then the spindle moulders not for you. Look at router tables or the woodrat. Once you've bought the machine don't foget the tooling and decent tooling ain't cheap either.

The spindle moulder is very much one of those machines that as a hobbyist you can get away without.

Just my few penneth worth!
 

jasonB

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Roger, the junior is basically a combi 2000 without the planer thicknesser bolted to the side. Mine is the combi 2000 and you will have to make a few passes with a 50mm block if you don't want to overload the motor.

The one in the pic does have the later fence/hood, the problem with mine is that you can only swing 140mm (160mm on the later one) this will mean that you have to use a small dia cutter block if the knives are not to come in contact with metal!!!! It also limits the dia of TCT profile blocks that will fit. I have made a separate fence for when I use my wobble saw.

Jason
 

RogerS

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Thanks Jason...my learning curve on these is starting to get more and more vertical :eek:

Think it's time for a raincheck as they say. :lol:
 

colinc

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Hi, was suprised to see this thread revived.

I never got around to buying a spindle moulder (nor did I get around to the project but my wife will be at me soon). At the moment all my needs have been met by my router table and a DW 1/2" router. Thanks for the info though.

Colin
 

The Restorer

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Mr. Grimsdale,

What are you making these spindle moulder cutter and limiters from? Are you drilling them to fit the safety pegs on the block then forming the profile and heat treating them?

Don't forget if buying old blocks they probably won't meet modern safety standards. I know these are for trade use, but the regs for the trade are there for a reason and that is safety, so shouldn't a hobby woodworker follow suit?

Tilting spindles and sliding tables are hardly luxuries, they add greater versatility to existing tooling and work methods.
 

RogerS

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I've just finished watching the Roy Sutton video and, as far as I could see, everything that he did on the spindle moulder could also be done on a router table.

I'm clearly missing something.
 
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