Quantcast

Some more questions re. shed

UKworkshop.co.uk

Help Support UKworkshop.co.uk:

DBT85

Established Member
Joined
19 Dec 2015
Messages
1,311
Reaction score
236
Location
Pershore, Worcester
Thanks, my reading of this is that the studs are stepped at the top tp sit under the rafter, and the "extra rafter" pieces are 47 by 47mm. I guess the celing OSB has to be fitted before the gable inner OSB?
Not sure if you csn see it in my build, but I did the walls first and then the ceiling. I just put a length of batten on the gable osb for the ceiling osb to secure to.

And yes, the studs are notched to sit under the rafter and protrude up the face of it and then some 50*50 to infil.
 

John Brown

Established Member
Joined
25 Sep 2008
Messages
1,613
Reaction score
23
Location
Stinchcombe, Gloucestershire
The 18mm OSB for the roof arrives tomorrow. I am figuring out how to get it up onto the rafters, but that's another story.
As my roof pitch is 34 degrees, I am wondering what is the best way to mate the boards at the ridge. Should I cut them at an angle - a sort of mitre joint? Have one side stick out by about 18mm, and but the other up to it? Some sort of filler strip?
I am open to ideas.
 

MikeG.

Established Member
Joined
24 Aug 2008
Messages
10,176
Reaction score
665
Location
Essex/ Suffolk border
........Have one side stick out by about 18mm, and but the other up to it? ......
This.

And be careful. It's hard to stop the boards slipping off the roof. Nail on some temporary battens, or get a couple of helpers.......and don't stand underneath them, ever.
 

John Brown

Established Member
Joined
25 Sep 2008
Messages
1,613
Reaction score
23
Location
Stinchcombe, Gloucestershire
Thanks. That was my first choice, but I thought I'd better check.
I will be very careful. At one side I have space to take a couple of lengths of 2 x 4, and extend the roof slope all the way to ground level, which I think will make things easier. At the other side, I don't, so I'm still pondering.
 

John Brown

Established Member
Joined
25 Sep 2008
Messages
1,613
Reaction score
23
Location
Stinchcombe, Gloucestershire
Last question for the weekend.
I'm almost decided on EPDM, but not 100% sure how it will look with waney edge larch cladding in this Cotswolds AONB. I like the idea of a 50 year life span, but I really won't care that much when I'm 117. So I'm wondering what the cons are of bitumous felt shingles.
 

DBT85

Established Member
Joined
19 Dec 2015
Messages
1,311
Reaction score
236
Location
Pershore, Worcester
Bit late but given you're going with waney edge larch on the walls and in a AONB, I'm surprised you'd go with either over something like cedar shingle or slate/fibre cement slate.

What did you choose in the end?
 

John Brown

Established Member
Joined
25 Sep 2008
Messages
1,613
Reaction score
23
Location
Stinchcombe, Gloucestershire
Felt shingles. My PP application stated felt, but I decided I wanted something a bit nicer (in my opinion).
Today, I am cursing the decision, and wishing I'd had the budget for slate, as I can't really reach across a row of 4 shingles from my roof ladder, and it all takes soooooo long, up the ladder, down the ladder, move the ladder... you get the idea. My over-the-road neighbour(who at 73 is 6 years my senior) is slating his oak framed car port, and is nimbly dancing around on the roofing battens.
Anyway, I've made my bed, so.I'll have to lie in it. I don't really have the budget for cedar shingles or Welsh slate. And I don't see how I could have managed a giant sheet of EPDM by myself. Added to which, it would have highlighted my crappy ridge line.

Still curious about the ex willow wielder...
 

John Brown

Established Member
Joined
25 Sep 2008
Messages
1,613
Reaction score
23
Location
Stinchcombe, Gloucestershire
I am a bit confused re. breather membrane and fitting window frames. If I search the internet, I can find about 126 different opinions on how to do things.
I have some oak window frames that I am repurposing. I made a rough and ready cill with a sloping edge and a drip groove, which I have affixed to the bottom of the frames.
I am not particularly bothered about the top of the window frame, as it is tucked away under the eaves, so unless the rain is blown upwards it should be OK. Also, I guess the cladding can overlap the top of the frame.
I figure I will have vertical battens that bridge the join between the shed frame and the window frame and which but up agains the ends of the cladding boards.
However, various internet sources say I should fold the Tyvek around the sides/not fold round the sides, fold over the bottom of the aperture/not fold over the bottom...
My inclination is to not fold any of the breather, and to seal any gaps with framing sealant.
What does the team think?
 

DBT85

Established Member
Joined
19 Dec 2015
Messages
1,311
Reaction score
236
Location
Pershore, Worcester
If in doubt, look at Mikes build or ask Mike.

Neither of which are here.

From what I can see in his photos he folded the membrane over for the bottom of the window but not the sides. You can drop him a PM at the other place and he'll only be too glad to help.
 

John Brown

Established Member
Joined
25 Sep 2008
Messages
1,613
Reaction score
23
Location
Stinchcombe, Gloucestershire
I just started cladding. Thought I'd begin with the end that has no windows or doors for simplicity. It does, however, have a gable end, and I'm wondering what happens at the top, in order to preserve the airflow under the cladding.
I guess I have to leave a gap, and add some more insect mesh, but what then?
Do I have to add more timber, i.e soffits?

I'm asking here first as I don't have login credentials for the other place on my phone, BTW, before you advise me to ask MikeG... I'll post over there when I have access to my desktop.
 

DBT85

Established Member
Joined
19 Dec 2015
Messages
1,311
Reaction score
236
Location
Pershore, Worcester
Have you got a photo John? My gable ends just went right up to the roof. You might be able to see it in my thread.
 

DBT85

Established Member
Joined
19 Dec 2015
Messages
1,311
Reaction score
236
Location
Pershore, Worcester
I didn't do anything for airflow up there. I secured a 50x50 to the gable rafters as something for the barge board to secure to (I later had to add an extra 22m filler on top). The battens along the gable were placed below that 50x50.

Theccladding boards then go upto the 50x50 and the barge board goes over the top butting against the underside of the roof.

I've forgotten what cladding you're using.
 

John Brown

Established Member
Joined
25 Sep 2008
Messages
1,613
Reaction score
23
Location
Stinchcombe, Gloucestershire
I'm using waney edged larch.
My roof is 18mm OSB, which overhangs the rafters by 75mm or so.
Seems strange to try and maintain that 25mm air gap under the cladding, and then seal it off at the gable. Not that it will be hermetically sealed...
 

Sheptonphil

Scrumpy junkie
Joined
29 Dec 2012
Messages
1,001
Reaction score
72
Location
Somerset
As MikeG said on many threads, lapped boards do not need venting at the top as there is sufficient air leakage all over to give good circulation without the vented top.
My shed construction has a vented bottom with insect mesh, 25mm gap all the way up, then at the top there is battens following the verge line to carry the barge fixings. Air will flow through the thin gaps between board overlaps.

If you were using sheet material like steel sheet etc which is not ‘leaky’, then you would need vented top.
 
Last edited:

John Brown

Established Member
Joined
25 Sep 2008
Messages
1,613
Reaction score
23
Location
Stinchcombe, Gloucestershire
Ok. I understand.
Seems like the insect mesh might be a waste of time, though, since there will almost certainly be gaps big enough for a wasp or two.
Thanks for the reply.
 
Top