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Some More Machine Advice Please - Planer Thicknesser

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ndbrown

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Fife
Hi John, sorry for the delay in replying, I had to check the photos on my computer to remind me. I pressed the new bearings onto the cutter block first, they were a light press fit, I warmed the bearings up in our oven. Once the new bearings were fitted. I fitted the rear casting complete with front stay with the lower bolts nipped up loosely. Then I used the thicknesser table plus blocks of wood to keep the cutter block in approximate position. The bearing outer races are a sliding fit the cast iron bearing housings on each side as they are retained by the grub screws. I fitted the front casting in place over the bearing and stay. Before tightening everything up, I used a straight edge across the infeed roller machined faces on each side to align the front and rear castings as best as I could then tightened all the bolts up. At this point and with everything tightened except the grub screws holding the bearings on each side, I aligned the cutter block in the approximate position. Once the drive belts and tables were finally fitted I had to again realign the cutter block to the edge of the recess in the rear table used for rebating cuts. It took just light taps to move the whole cutter block from side to side with the grub screws loose. Hope that makes sense. Having the block parallel to the tables is much more critical than having it perfectly at 90 degrees to the front casting, I guess Sedgwick allowed for this by making the front bearing self aligning. If I can add, these are fantastic machines when up and running, compact and accurate. I have had a Hammer A3-26 with Helical head now for a few years which has also been fantastic but was really bought as I am in a modern housing state and the helical head really reduces noise levels. I had some minor complaints from neighbours about the noise from the Sedgwick, which was really typical of most straight knife machines and not specific to the Sedgwick. At the price level for a reasonable secondhand machine, there is nothing to touch the Sedgwick for ease of operation, accuracy and simplicity of construction.
Nigel
 
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John samson

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6 Aug 2020
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Location
Chelmsford
Hi John, sorry for the delay in replying, I had to check the photos on my computer to remind me. I pressed the new bearings onto the cutter block first, they were a light press fit, I warmed the bearings up in our oven. Once the new bearings were fitted. I fitted the rear casting complete with front stay with the lower bolts nipped up loosely. Then I used the thicknesser table plus blocks of wood to keep the cutter block in approximate position. The bearing outer races are a sliding fit the cast iron bearing housings on each side as they are retained by the grub screws. I fitted the front casting in place over the bearing and stay. Before tightening everything up, I used a straight edge across the infeed roller machined faces on each side to align the front and rear castings as best as I could then tightened all the bolts up. At this point and with everything tightened except the grub screws holding the bearings on each side, I aligned the cutter block in the approximate position. Once the drive belts and tables were finally fitted I had to again realign the cutter block to the edge of the recess in the rear table used for rebating cuts. It took just light taps to move the whole cutter block from side to side with the grub screws loose. Hope that makes sense. Having the block parallel to the tables is much more critical than having it perfectly at 90 degrees to the front casting, I guess Sedgwick allowed for this by making the front bearing self aligning. If I can add, these are fantastic machines when up and running, compact and accurate. I have had a Hammer A3-26 with Helical head now for a few years which has also been fantastic but was really bought as I am in a modern housing state and the helical head really reduces noise levels. I had some minor complaints from neighbours about the noise from the Sedgwick, which was really typical of most straight knife machines and not specific to the Sedgwick. At the price level for a reasonable secondhand machine, there is nothing to touch the Sedgwick for ease of operation, accuracy and simplicity of construction.
Nigel
Thanks Nigel that's very informative. I have put the machine back together today and all seems to be good. As usual the machine did not come with a bridge guard or a dust hood. I'm busy trying to make alternative parts. I tried Sedgewick but the cost was quite excessive.
I previously had a Wadkin 9 inch jointer and a multico thicknesser
But I think the Sedgewick is great little machine. My one point of disappointment is the fence which is not in the same league as the old Wadkin.
I'm a great believer in the theory that old machines are a joy to use when you get them working correctly.
My other project is an old ( 1950 s ) delta unisaw. Hopefully both will be working as good as new shortly.

Thanks again

John
 
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