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Solid Surface - fine scratch and 'bloom' removal.

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galleywood

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Three year old window cill and handbasin surround (coffee bean colour with copper flecks) has a few fine scratches and a 'bloom' on it in places.
What products and method are required to remove them?
Thanks.
 

Lons

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Depends what it is and unsure what you mean by "bloom", is that actually a stain of some kind?
The best method if you can get it in a a ROS with Abranet mesh disks.

You need first to decide what level of finish you had or want as the grits you go down to will determine what you get. On Mistral or Corian for example you can get a nice satin with 400g or glossier with 600g and above.

Can easily be done by hand though if not a big area, just more work.
Whatever you do it will need a final polish and the manufacturers sell a care kit but most hard surface polishes will do the job.

Rather than explain in detail I suggest you do some googling as there are instruction videos out there. Most of the worktops I installed were Mistral but the principle is the same.

Here's a generic video but do a search there are loads of how to repair and finish these products.
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=_xiVtgcHOtE

EDIT:
I glued some bits together recently, turned a lidded pot and polished using some car G3 compound witch worked beautifully and gave a gloss finish might be worth a try if you have something similar though likely just as expensive as worktop polish if you need to buy.
 

galleywood

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Lons
Thanks for the info - I will follow up on all you suggested.
Re the 'bloom' - some areas have a slightly milky white appearance - I will try the polish on these areas.
 

Lons

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The surfaces are designed to be repairable so as long as you're careful it's not a difficult process. Just follow the old advice and try the finest abrasive first and it that doesn't shift it go to the next more aggressive until it's gone and then fine again until polished.
In your case a fine scotchbrite might be all you need, maybe even with a little CIF if careful and feather out the area or at worst do the whole lot then polish up. Don't use anything that contains bleach ( don't know if CIF does btw ) as it can stain and that might well have caused bloom in the first place. Most of the cleaning sprays you buy have it, I had to stop my missus using them in the kitchen.
 
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