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powerhouse

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Hey guys going to invest in a small tenon saw ( carcass saw ) both rip and crosscut.
I have narrowed it down to these three,
Adria small tenon saw
Pax 1776
Lie- Nielson

Ok I know at the end of the day, it comes down to personal preference, but I cant make my mind up witch make to go for.
I have not used any of these before, so any recommendations would be appreciated.

Cheers

Ken :wink:
 

bugbear

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powerhouse":usnodb8n said:
Hey guys going to invest in a small tenon saw ( carcass saw ) both rip and crosscut.
I have narrowed it down to these three,
Adria small tenon saw
Pax 1776
Lie- Nielson

Ok I know at the end of the day, it comes down to personal preference, but I cant make my mind up witch make to go for.
I have not used any of these before, so any recommendations would be appreciated.

Cheers

Ken :wink:
I've had a go with all three (but I only own vintage saws). The Pax is by far the least comfortable, with the handle having pronounced arris. The cutting action was also (only) "OK".

http://www.flinn-garlick-saws.co.uk/index.html

Does anyone know the differences between the Lynx and Pax range? I think (but am not sure) its mainly the handle, in which case a woodworker skilled with rasp and sandpaper could save a good deal of money.

Adria and LN I can't (usefully) choose between. Both happened to suit my hand very well, the cutting performance was similar, and superior to the Pax.

BugBear
 

dunbarhamlin

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BB said:
Does anyone know the differences between the Lynx and Pax range? I think (but am not sure) its mainly the handle, in which case a woodworker skilled with rasp and sandpaper could save a good deal of money.
Many moons ago I did ask of the difference, and if I remember apart from the handle and taper grind on some backless saws, it boiled down to hand sharpening.
Could try and dig up the mail exchange, but it was a years ago, so probably better to seek up to date info - I found them most helpful.

Do agree that the finish of the 1776 handle lets in down - though of the three mentioned, having "been at it" with rasp, file and shellac, I now prefer it.

Of course after the first touch up, the only difference is the handle, depth of blade and weight of spine, so this is more important than how well it cuts.
Considering some of the boutique alternatives in the same price bracket, I don't put the LN very far up the food chain.
 

condeesteso

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I think the Veritas has to be on the list... good value, excellent quality, clever design (Axminster have 'em).
 

Modernist

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Personally I found the LN far too light compared to an older saw and sold mine after a week (at a profit :D )
 

bugbear

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flounder":1ns4do9j said:
condeesteso":1ns4do9j said:
I think the Veritas has to be on the list... good value, excellent quality, clever design (Axminster have 'em).
+1
Agreed. I was respecting the OP's short list. I assume a traditional look was preferred.

BugBear
 

powerhouse

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Thanks for the replays, the Veritas is good value as said, but it's not for me.

Cheers ;)
 

pedder

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Hi,

two more more options come to my mind: Wenzloff & Sons @ Leevalley Carcass saw for 140$. And in UK: Find old Spear & Jackson.

From the 3 you named I onlx tried the Adria and really like her.

Cheers
Pedder
 

condeesteso

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Seeing Pedder's post prompts me of a possible oversight! Could a Two Lawyers be on the list?? I would honestly regard that as a 'lifetime' tool.
 

pedder

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Hi Douglas,

Don't know, our basic open handeled saws start at 170€ (But most people want some extras like the oval spine or a special wood).

And we have a 4-5 month backlog.

Cheers
Pedder

Edit for typo at the price
 

LuptonM

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If the euro continues as it is, we'll all be buying saws from Pedder!!!!!!!!!

BTW how do u tell if a saw is as sharp as it could be?
 

pedder

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LuptonM":3l0j666i said:
If the euro continues as it is, we'll all be buying saws from Pedder!!!!!!!!!

BTW how do u tell if a saw is as sharp as it could be?
it cuts smooth & fast and doesn't do the slightest jump in the cut:

Cheers
Pedder
 

LuptonM

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Sorry to hijack the thread, its just that in trying to lean to cut dovetails I find my veritas dovetail saw (14 tooth/inch) hard to get started (which affects the straightness of the cut). Would the factory sharpening be sufficient or is it more to do with the amount of set of tpi?
 

condeesteso

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'lean to cut' might be a clue - not sure what that means. But generally 'the first cut is (not) the deepest' . A light start (no pressure, let the blade do the work), and a nearly flat angle to the stock. Once the kerf is established, then raise the angle. Some fine saws have a less aggressive cut at the tip for this reason of starting the cut, but I'm not sure about the Veritas. Generally though, start very gentle, and only when the kerf is made can you safely increase the stroke and make greater progress with total control.
 

pedder

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condeesteso":2djjrq9f said:
A light start (no pressure, let the blade do the work),
That is the main tip, IMO. The Veritas is quite soft to startbecause of the 14° rake angle.

Cheers Pedder
 

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