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Richard_C

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My lathe has a simple belt speed change, minimum 360 rpm.

We were throwing out an old not used for years ice cream maker that I remember getting with Esso vouchers back in the early 90s, I got lots of vouchers because I did 50,000 miles a year and my employer gave me free fuel for my 2.9 Granada 23mpg or 19 in a hurry special.

I kept the motor, useful for something surely. After much pondering about brackets and belts, I cut off the paddles and sharpened the square section plastic shaft with a stanley knife to give what engineers might call an interference fit in the headstock knockout bar hole. I'm not an engineer so I just shoved it in. A block of wood to support the motor bit so it doesn't rotate, switch on and I have a very slow lathe, less than 15 rpm. No real power.

So what's it good for? Marking out, scribing, and applying finishes and stains by brush or cloth without it flying everywhere. Probably more besides. When done, pull it out and start the lathe.

Others might have similar old things that could be used.


ice cream.jpg
 

Adam Pinson

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My lathe has a simple belt speed change, minimum 360 rpm.

We were throwing out an old not used for years ice cream maker that I remember getting with Esso vouchers back in the early 90s, I got lots of vouchers because I did 50,000 miles a year and my employer gave me free fuel for my 2.9 Granada 23mpg or 19 in a hurry special.

I kept the motor, useful for something surely. After much pondering about brackets and belts, I cut off the paddles and sharpened the square section plastic shaft with a stanley knife to give what engineers might call an interference fit in the headstock knockout bar hole. I'm not an engineer so I just shoved it in. A block of wood to support the motor bit so it doesn't rotate, switch on and I have a very slow lathe, less than 15 rpm. No real power.

So what's it good for? Marking out, scribing, and applying finishes and stains by brush or cloth without it flying everywhere. Probably more besides. When done, pull it out and start the lathe.

Others might have similar old things that could be used.


View attachment 120513
My lathe has a simple belt speed change, minimum 360 rpm.

We were throwing out an old not used for years ice cream maker that I remember getting with Esso vouchers back in the early 90s, I got lots of vouchers because I did 50,000 miles a year and my employer gave me free fuel for my 2.9 Granada 23mpg or 19 in a hurry special.

I kept the motor, useful for something surely. After much pondering about brackets and belts, I cut off the paddles and sharpened the square section plastic shaft with a stanley knife to give what engineers might call an interference fit in the headstock knockout bar hole. I'm not an engineer so I just shoved it in. A block of wood to support the motor bit so it doesn't rotate, switch on and I have a very slow lathe, less than 15 rpm. No real power.

So what's it good for? Marking out, scribing, and applying finishes and stains by brush or cloth without it flying everywhere. Probably more besides. When done, pull it out and start the lathe.

Others might have similar old things that could be used.


View attachment 120513
Nice, i made one from an old disco ball motor, i'm older now, it's a different kind of party.
 

Richard_C

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I'm pretty sure the balls predated discos. Mecca ballrooms c. early 1950s? Must have been called mirror balls or something.
 

okeydokey

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Halfway through reading the post I started to think get some simple pulleys etc and it will turn faster but then I stopped when you mentioned lathe and yes its a good use - wonder what else this slow rpm could be used for
 

scooby

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Nice solution. I saw an old video from Marius Hornberger doing a similar thing but he used a cordless drill with a jig to partially press the trigger. Your method is more efficient/elegant.
Without sounding smug, I'm fortunate my lathe can go from 0 to max speed(s).
 
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