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Slipstone revival?

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Richard_C

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I've got a small slipstone and a small sharpening stone, both used rarely but handy at times. Been doing a bit of woodcarving lately using some old but nice Henry Taylor gouges so the slipstone is back in use.

Both small stones are grubby and oily-feeling from 30 years in a box in the garage. I could just buy new but don't like throwing good things in the bin if I don't have to. I wondered if soaking in something - meths, petrol, a trip through the dishwasher - might revive their spirit?

Is there a 'proper way' to bring old sharpening stones back to life?
 

The_Yellow_Ardvark

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I boil the ones I get in water and Ferry liquid.

I place the stones on blocks, add water and Ferry until they are covered and slowly bring the boil.

This washes the oil and crud out.
I then let them dry out in a warm dry place. Then steep them in a light oil. Last time I used Duck oil.

At Men In Shed we get a few that need to be restored.
 

Richard_C

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Worked nicely thanks, lifted most of the crud off, boiled for 20 mins in water plus washing up liquid.

I was stacking the dishwasher at the time so popped them in as well afterwards and that moved it on a bit more. I now have 2 useable small stones.
 

Sheffield Tony

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As an alternative, a quick wash off with paraffin and a stiff paintbrush did the job for my old Norton stones. Looked like new.
 

Sean Hellman

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Boiling is probably the most eco method. Sometimes a rub on glass with a 80grit loose abrasive does wonders and works well, especially if glazed and not cutting. This is good for square or triangular slips to sharpen up the corners. I always use the grit dry without any cutting fluid which just makes a big mess and is more hassle than its worth.
 

pe2dave

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Boiling is probably the most eco method. Sometimes a rub on glass with a 80grit loose abrasive does wonders and works well, especially if glazed and not cutting. This is good for square or triangular slips to sharpen up the corners. I always use the grit dry without any cutting fluid which just makes a big mess and is more hassle than its worth.
Where do you buy loose grit from please? Sounds like an excellent idea.
 
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