• We invite you to join UKWorkshop.
    Members can turn off viewing Ads!

Slater Infill Shoulder Plane info needed

UKworkshop.co.uk

Help Support UKworkshop.co.uk:

GazPal

Established Member
Joined
30 Jul 2010
Messages
1,136
Reaction score
0
Location
North East England
Hi,

I've just been rumaging through a couple of the family's old workshop tool chests and uncovered a pretty robust but nicely formed 1.5" wide x 7.75" long cast iron and rosewood infilled shoulder plane by a maker named H Slater, Meredith St, Clerkenwell, London (Stamped into the heel and with an M beneath).

I'm wondering if anyone might be able to shed more light on/have more information on this maker, because it's something from among my great grandfather's tools and it'll be nice to be able find out a little more. :?:

Any help will be gratefully appreciated, as it's a family piece.
 

yetloh

Established Member
Joined
1 Dec 2008
Messages
1,417
Reaction score
34
Location
Sussex
Slater was one of the lesser known 19th C makers but Slater planes do pop quite regularly. I have read that they were in business from 1873 to 1877. No doubt someone who knows more about them than me will be along soon.

Jim
 

GazPal

Established Member
Joined
30 Jul 2010
Messages
1,136
Reaction score
0
Location
North East England
Many thanks Jim. The years you've quoted certainly fit within the period in which my great grandfather was active. Being Newcasle upon Tyne based, how he came into possession of a London maker's plane is something I'm also trying to look into, although we do have relatives in the south.
 

jimi43

Established Member
Joined
12 Mar 2009
Messages
6,921
Reaction score
3
Location
Kent - the Garden of England
I love the design of Slater planes. They tend to be sleeker than their Norris or Spiers counterparts.

Any chance of some pictures my friend?

Jim
 

Evergreen

Established Member
Joined
12 Jan 2006
Messages
531
Reaction score
0
Location
Hampshire
My avatar shows my shoulder plane which has an iron stamped "Benj. Slater London" with an arrow trademark under a "Matchless" banner. Strangely, the body of the plane has no markings at all.

As you can see, the turrets are flat topped which, according to an old copy of F&C, is further indication of a London fashion. I've always considered it to be a "Slater" shoulder plane and I'm fascinated there's another planemaker also called Slater who was also based in London!

Like Jimi, I'd be interested to see what yours looks like.
 

GazPal

Established Member
Joined
30 Jul 2010
Messages
1,136
Reaction score
0
Location
North East England
jimi43":3nr1u78f said:
I love the design of Slater planes. They tend to be sleeker than their Norris or Spiers counterparts.

Any chance of some pictures my friend?

Jim
I've another Slater which is a small cast bodied 3.5" long chariot plane that I also rescued from the tool chest. Both planes fill the hand very comfortably when in use (I couldn't resist taking a few shavings after basic cleanup) and are definitely staying in the family.

I'm hopeless with technology, but will try and post some pictures as soon as possible. :)
 

GazPal

Established Member
Joined
30 Jul 2010
Messages
1,136
Reaction score
0
Location
North East England
Alf":152bxknk said:
I'd guess that probably this post by Don McConnell is about as comprehensive on detail as you'll find online.
Many thanks for the information Alf. It's funny, but I've never done much delving into the history of tools, etc., over the past years, but this has certainly peaked my interest.
 

GazPal

Established Member
Joined
30 Jul 2010
Messages
1,136
Reaction score
0
Location
North East England
Evergreen":1li0pswz said:
My avatar shows my shoulder plane which has an iron stamped "Benj. Slater London" with an arrow trademark under a "Matchless" banner. Strangely, the body of the plane has no markings at all.

As you can see, the turrets are flat topped which, according to an old copy of F&C, is further indication of a London fashion. I've always considered it to be a "Slater" shoulder plane and I'm fascinated there's another planemaker also called Slater who was also based in London!

Like Jimi, I'd be interested to see what yours looks like.
The example I have has "H SLATER" stamped above the rear screw, with "MAKER, MEREDITH ROAD, CLERKENWELL, LONDON" directly beneath it and then a capital "M" set bottom most in the centre. All in 1.35mm high capital lettering, with the "M" sized at 3mm.

The blade is marked with what appears to be a shamrock set above "W Marples & Son, Sheffield, England".

Pic's as soon as possible.
 

Derek Cohen (Perth Oz)

Established Member
Joined
2 Mar 2005
Messages
2,860
Reaction score
367
Location
Perth, Australia
As I understand it, Slater was the OEM of his time, manufacturing many infills that would be badged under the names of other planemakers.

My copy of Goodman records Henry being around 1868-77. The company continued until at least 1909 (that I know of).

I seem to recall that the guys who made the ill-fated Shepherd infill kits a few years back in the US were very fond of Slater, and modelled their designs on them.

Regards from Perth

Derek
 

Alf

Established Member
Joined
22 Oct 2003
Messages
12,079
Reaction score
0
Location
Up the proverbial creek
Shepherd were Canadian. (Although their case may be an occasion when Canadians are happy to let the 'Murricans take the credit...)

It's funny about Slater - my initial thought was that there must be tons of info about them floating about, because it's not exactly an unknown maker, but when you come to look, there really isn't. The OEM explanation probably makes the most sense. Sort of sad though, that so little is known about a tool maker who was so productive, and of well-regarded tools, too. :(
 

GazPal

Established Member
Joined
30 Jul 2010
Messages
1,136
Reaction score
0
Location
North East England
It is strange there's not much information out there if Slater's products were apparently held in such high regard. All I can say is that both examples I have are very comfortable to use and more than capable of doing the work for which they're intended.
 
Top