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Size of Scheppach TS2500 (Adam?)

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Martin

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I'm getting awfully close to taking the plunge with this TS, but wanted to be sure that it would fit within the space allocated in my workshop. I know the core table dimensions (800x680), and that will fit without problem, but wondered what space it needs when the sliding carriage is attached (can't seem to find details of it's dimensions anywhere on the web).

If Adam or anyone else that owns the 2500 could help that'd be great. No point in buying the extra bits if I don't have the space to use them....

Incidentally, I will probably buy the wheel kit as well, so that it can be brought into the centre of the shop and pushed back as necessary, but I need to know how much physical space it will take when "stored" like this.

TIA.

Martin.
 

Adam

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Martin,

I'm happy to take some measurements for you, but I'm laid up with back trouble at the moment, I don't think I can get to the workshop for a day or two at least.

To answer a couple of your comments though, the Scheppach wheel kit is rubbish - don't waste your money - look at some of the ones at Brimarc or Axminster/Rutlands. (e.g. ones with a wheel in each corner).

For me, I wouldn't buy the saw without the sliding carriage - it;s very easy to lift on and off, if you need the space surrounding it. It's also worth pointing out you can select whether the bar the carriage slides on sticks out to the front or the back, or anything inbetween.

Give me a day or two, and if I haven't got the measurements, send me a PM. At the moment, I can't walk much at all, so will have to see it goes after seeing the physio again on Monday.

adam
 

Martin

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Adam,

Thanks for the info - and sorry to hear about your back - must be frustrating not to be able to go into the workshop (not to mention painful as well!). I hope you didn't come a cropper when lugging your TS out of the workshop to cut those doors the other day ... :(

If the sliding carriage comes on/off quickly and easily then I guess that solves it. Presumably the bar it rides has to stay put, but that's not a problem provided it doesn't stick out too much.
And thanks for the tip on the wheel base - I'll check out what Axminster has to offer.

Cheers,
Martin.
 

Chris Knight

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Martin,

I have the TS 4010 which I think is slightly bigger than the TS 2500 in some directions. Anyway, the bar on which the sliding table slides can be removed if need be. The sliding table itself only takes a moment to put on/take off but you do need to put it somewhere (eg hang it on a wall, have a handy shelf or some such.

A sheet of ply makes the top of the saw a handy working surface and if you get the fold up extension table that is another potentially large working surface. I actually find in my smallish shop that these aspects make the saw more useful for the available space than the smaller TS2000 which I owned previously.
 

Martin

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Thanks Chris. Those are exactly the kind of features that attract me to this TS - seems like it's designed with the smaller workshop in mind. I'm thinking of getting the carriage + fold down extension table (after, it's huge hole in the wallet anyway, so a little more won't make much different :lol: ).
 
A

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Hello Martin

Sorry I didn't notice your post when I was signed on earlier in the day. I've just nipped into the workshop and can report as follows (E&OE at this time of night :wink:)

Yep its 800 by 600 but the fence rail sticks out and if you take into account the locking handle you may as well say it is 1000 by 600.

Sliding carriage is 1400 long sticks out 130 from the side of the table. The table on the sliding carriage is 500 square.

The mitre fence on the sliding table assembly is basically 960 long and can be extended further.

Its pretty flexible how far the sliding table guide sticks out each end of the saw. If you have it so the back edge of your work just clears the blade then the front end of the 1400 will be level with the front end of the saw. Hence in this configuration you will have the maximum depth of cut at 90 degrees. You can slide it forward and get less depth of cut. If you want to cut at 45 degrees this will also need to be taken into account. Does that make any sense at all?

Haven't got any wheels, haven't got room for any extentions.

Hope this helps. Let me know if you need any other measurements or explanations (for what they're worth.)

Regards

Roy
 

Martin

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Roy,

That's just what I needed - thanks very much for your help. So I guess worse case is about 800 wide with the s/c but no table attached, and 1100-1200 with (but without the mitre fence on).

It's likely to be width that's the limiting factor when the table's stored, but I think it's all looking plausible. Time for a good clear-up of the workshop I think :D.

Thanks once again for all your help.

Martin
 

trevtheturner

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Martin,

As an alternative to buying a wheel kit, why not think braked castors (about 3 quid each) and a wooden frame to make a trolley for your new saw and save yourself £££s. FWIW.

Cheers,

Trev.
 

Adam

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Just to follow up on Chris's comments, it's not just the sliding table that is easily removed, the bar is also easily removed as well. Two wing nuts, and then lift it off a set of upper support brackets (which keep it square and straight). It's quite easy and only takes a few seconds.

As Chris points out, you need somewhere to store it though! The bar is easy enough - you can stand it up with your wood store, the sliding table is a bit more "odd" shaped, but could be clamped to the wall, or kept on a shelf.

Adam
 

Martin

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Thanks for all of your collective help. My reasons for NOT buying this TS are dropping like dominoes :D ....think it's only a matter of time (but the workshop will definitely need a tidy up first).

I just hope there isn't a waiting list for these things - I've got some nice white oak on order for a coffee table I'm going to build next - the TS would certainly make that job easier. However I need to be sensible and wait till I've got the space sorted...

Trev: Thanks for the tip about the wheel base - seriously worth considering given that the better versions from Rutlands etc. retail for up to £70. Actually I've already made a mobile base/trolley for my jointer and thicknesser. However it doesn't run along the workshop floor very well (which is concrete). I think the problem is the wheels - they're some sort of poly material rather than rubber, which I'm sure would make all the difference...

Cheers,
Martin.
 

Mike.C

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Hi Martin,

I have got a excellent heavy duty wheel kit from Axminster. There are 2 models, the first one carries up to 250kg and can be adjusted from 460mm to 710mm (model number 708118) and it costs £59.95, the second one carries up to 540kg and can be adjusted from 610mm to 860mm (model number 708119) and it costs £79.94.

They both have 4 swivel wheels which are lockable.

Hope this helps

Regards

Mike
 

Digizz

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Interestingly, the bods at NMA yesterday recommended against the Scheppach wheel kit and suggested the HTC one (like Rutlands sell) which is meant to be very good - so I ordered one!

P.S - Are you aware that the TS2500 CAST IRON table is shipping in about 4 weeks time? I've ordered one from Rutlands - it's marginally more expensive than the existing one :)
 

Adam

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I didn't find out how rubbish the Scheppach wheel kit was until AFTER I had ordered it. I can't understand how they can have such a non-functional accessory, on something that is so well designed and engineered.

Adam.
 

Digizz

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I wonder what the HMS260ci wheel kit is like - I was meant to get a free one with mine but it was missed from the order (like several other customers apparently). Should be here today/tomorrow hopefully.

Quite prepared to buy a replacement though.
 

Adam

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I found the main problem was getting it in and out of the slots, in the end, I tied string to the axle, and can pull it forward, and backward, by pulling the string towards the front of the saw, or round the back.

It'll make sense once you see it.

Adam
 

Martin

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Mike: Thanks for the tip - I think I'll be going for either the Axminster or Rutlands base, which looks far more flexible (the Scheppach wheel kit looks like it only allows movement in one direction).

Digizz: Yes I was aware of the CI version - Rutlands sent me the flyer by email a week or so ago. Despite their "special introductory offer price" (which doesn't seem much different to other suppliers - DMT for example) I'm going to wait until I've got the workshop sorted out, which will probably mean a month or so before I get the order in. I have my doubts that the price will go up significantly (if at all) - it's just good marketing on the part of Rutlands I think...

Martin.
 
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