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Crowman

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I hope you folks don't mind me picking your brains, still trying to work it all out. It concerns single speed scrollsaws. When single speed saws run is it at the max speed; i.e. if a varispeed on the same model is between 400 and 1400 will the single speed be running at 1400? And is this a good idea? What would be the ideal speed for cutting something like quarter to eighth inch ply?

Thanks
 

jadboog

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My understanding is that single speed machines run at the full speed specified under ideal operating circumstances - note that power tools rarely reachs the actual full speed specified as that is the manufacturer's 'optimum speed', but fixed-speed machines should reach a consistent speed for cutting.

My understanding is that fixed speed machines are designed for wood exclusively (up to the thickness specified by the manufacturer) and the variable speed allows you to cut other materials such as thin metals and plastics, which need a lower speed for smooth cutting. Whilst I only cut wood, I find the variable speed dial useful to fine tune vibration on the machine (i.e. turning just below full power dramatically reduces the vibration in the machine if you haven't got it bolted down).
 

Gill

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Generally speaking, most single speed machines run at about 1400 strokes per minute. That is fine for most types of woodwork although I believe it is really too fast for metalwork. It is unsuitable for cutting very fine pieces of wood, such as marquetry veneers.

You should be able to cut 6mm (1/4") plywood very successfully with a single speed saw. You would be unlikely to experience problems with 3mm (1/8") plywood, especially since the glued laminates are cross layered and will support each other. However, if you were to cut a 3mm piece of wood you might experience problems with the wood breaking, especially if it is soft or if you are cutting fine bridges. The thinner the workpiece, the more sense it makes to install a zero-clearance insert which will give the wood as much support as possible at the point of the cut. A zero-clearance insert can be something as simple as an address card which is presented to the saw blade and cut half way through, then taped to the saw's table.
 

Crowman

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Thanks for this info, you have been very helpful and I'm beginning to get a clearer picture now.
 

Clockie

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For thin wood like 1/8" you could use a piece of 1/4" ply as a backer both taped together. Running on a single speed machine should not be a problem.
 

Chippygeoff

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Hi crowman. I could not make the things I do with a fixed speed machine. As Gill said, a single speed machine will tend to run at full speed and with delicate portrait work on thin birch ply I would find the highest speed far to much as I would need about 1/4 speed for this type of work. I cannot remember ever having any of my saws running at full speed, even on thick 3/4 inch hardwood I only go at about two thirds of the speed available, it all depends on what your cutting and what type and size of blade you are using. It will all come with experience but I would steer clear of a single speed machine.

Geoff.
 

Geoffrey

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Hi all i have seen some beautiful work done on a single speed machines.
A beginner might gain some comfort from slowing speed down.
I find Blade choice and feed speed more inportent.
i set mine for fastest speed minimum virbration.
A hegnar MK 1 Single speed is like a sewing Machine conpaired to cheap stuff.
You only need to Look at the problems with Blade clamps to see what i mean.
I had a saw years a go with the same clamps and i think are only fit for pinned blades
The only time i realy slow my saw down is for plastics or very thin wood.

Geoff :)
 

Blister

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In this day and age it would say

variable :mrgreen:
 

Crowman

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Thanks again folks. I think the variable speed is the way to go. And I'm now caught between a Sheppach and the much more expensive Hegner. Might have to raid the piggybank if I go for the Hegner. £300 or £745? Mmmmm
 

Blister

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Crowman":3gtku75t said:
Thanks again folks. I think the variable speed is the way to go. And I'm now caught between a Sheppach and the much more expensive Hegner. Might have to raid the piggybank if I go for the Hegner. £300 or £745? Mmmmm
did you miss the Multicut 1 V/S :mrgreen:


HM-1V Multicut 1 Scrollsaw Variable Speed 230v 100w 525.00GBP

at the bottom of this page

http://www.hegner.co.uk/Hegner_Multicut_1
 

jadboog

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Geoffrey":nqqgmgcq said:
+1Hegner keep your eye on Ebay they pop up often.
Be prepared to pay almost full price though - they retain their value really well!
 

Crowman

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Did look at the Multicut1, Blister. Good machine but only 14' throat.
 

Olwyn

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Hi
I have a Hegner lookalike, the Axminster one had it for 5 years and no troble at all.

Have upgraded the blade holders to the Hegner ones its a dream to use often cutting 2in Ash with it.

If you lived near me you could pop in and try it.

Best of luck
Olwyn (hammer)
 

Crowman

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thanks hawkinob, will take a look at them. There seems to be quite a few about, and they all seem to come from the east! It's the build quality I'm concerned about.
 

hawkinob

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Hi Crowman,
My Hegner 'lookalike' was made in Taiwan, wouldn't know about the Axminster one but as I've mentioned I'd guess that they come from the same factory - Axminster woul tell you where they come from or someone who owns one. I've had mine for for a while, about five years, and other than a small pin that I lost (replaced with a split pin, no further trouble) I'm very satisfied with mine. I am no expert but having used a Hegner for a day I would rank my 'lookalike' as equal or near equal. However the German made - I'm assuming the Hegner is made in Germany, or is that farmed out too? - might be worth the extra. Also I've seen hardly any (infact none) bad reports on the "lookalike' in the various forums.
Good luck.
Bob H.
 

Crowman

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Thanks for the offer Olwyn. Yorshire's a bit of a trek from Essex! Kind offer though. I'm going to the SE Woodworking show this weekend. Should see some stuff there with a bit of luck.
 
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