Quantcast

Silly Thought - but keeps coming back into my head!!

UKworkshop.co.uk

Help Support UKworkshop.co.uk:

Stanleymonkey

Established Member
Joined
15 Jun 2014
Messages
752
Reaction score
11
Location
South West London
We've probably all seen the famous Studley and Schuster tool chests.

https://youtu.be/ZVEKmlhP2Ss

https://youtu.be/J6XdrLCaBnA

With 3D printing, CNC machines and design software widely available I keep wondering if the modern equivalent of these chests will appear? A marketing gimmick that gets a bit of social media attention for that brand? A briefcase sized tool box with 3D printed stands and mounts that fold out to reveal 500 hundred tools . Even a set of power tools where the cases fit so closely together that a sander, drill and jigsaw all pack away into a shoebox sized case?

Like I said - a silly idea. Just wondering what others think?
 

AES

Established Member
Joined
18 Feb 2011
Messages
4,400
Reaction score
137
Location
Switzerland, near Basel
Exactly my own thought.

Once, long ago, someone gave me an old solicitors' deed box (quite robust, sheet metal). "Great" thinks I, "ideal for bigger tools!" And so it was/is, size-wise. But lift it up/move it around easily? No chance!

Which is why I'm often surprised to see WIPs here making such tools wooden chests - AND my local specialist tool dealer has ready-made wooden ones for sale, with or without tools.

For me anyway, these things are a nice idea, and they look great, but are totally impractical as soon as they've got more than about 3 or 4 small tools in them! And size-wise, far too bulky to move around easily, even empty.

I should stress I'm NOT any sort of "profi" and the above - unpopular in some quarters I'm sure - is simply my own idea.

Although I don't have any myself, IF I was an on-site tradesman of some sort, the modern plastic Systainer-type thingies would be MUCH preferable I think.

About the only use I can see for these big tool chests would be for a tradesman wholly shop- based if he/she changed employer and had to move his tools on a one-off basis to another shop.

So a useless space-waster for a hobbyist.

NOT trying to be provocative, no doubt many will disagree - just my own take.
 

D_W

Established Member
Joined
24 Aug 2015
Messages
4,542
Reaction score
14
Location
PA, US
I'm sure there are novel demonstrations of printers and CNC machines (just as people suddenly started to "carve" tons of santa faces and such when the carvewright machines came out).

I think the difference between someone like studley and the folks using CNC and printers, though, is first - a lack of artfulness, and second, rapid advancement (there's a chance anything that you'd make will be shown as antiquated and obsolete as resolution and capabilities improve).

At some point, CNC and printers will probably be able to observe a piece, plan it out and make it on their own, though, and someone may use something like the studley chest as a means of showing off a machine that can pretty much make a version of the same thing in metal and plastic (perhaps something cellulose based) with nothing other than loading of materials will be interesting.

Another side thought is that with powder metals, most of us probably thought printing would be used to make prototypes, but my understanding is that a lot of smaller run parts can now be printed as a manufacturing technique (I realize I'm probably a half of a decade out of it as far as technology goes and this isn't news) in metal or whatever else rather than developing dies and such, or even using CNCs to make the same thing. I suspect that metal printing will become the better "pot metal" for the next generation (cast zinc junk being the cheapo coarse stuff made when the budget doesn't allow for making something good).
 

D_W

Established Member
Joined
24 Aug 2015
Messages
4,542
Reaction score
14
Location
PA, US
A grand idea - your post made me think that the best way to entice people into making the best they can is to create a contest. Make people competitive.

I looked for "3d printer contest" and the first strike was a laser cutter contest:

https://www.instructables.com/contest/CNC2019/

(a studley chest could come out of something like these contests -the promise of glory from winning pushing people further)

From an advertising standpoint, I can't imagine a manufacturer getting much more for their advertising bucks than running a contest and showing the results from experienced users.
 

Stanleymonkey

Established Member
Joined
15 Jun 2014
Messages
752
Reaction score
11
Location
South West London
AES":16sh5il9 said:
Exactly my own thought.

Once, long ago, someone gave me an old solicitors' deed box (quite robust, sheet metal). "Great" thinks I, "ideal for bigger tools!" And so it was/is, size-wise. But lift it up/move it around easily? No chance!

Which is why I'm often surprised to see WIPs here making such tools wooden chests - AND my local specialist tool dealer has ready-made wooden ones for sale, with or without tools.

For me anyway, these things are a nice idea, and they look great, but are totally impractical as soon as they've got more than about 3 or 4 small tools in them! And size-wise, far too bulky to move around easily, even empty.

I should stress I'm NOT any sort of "profi" and the above - unpopular in some quarters I'm sure - is simply my own idea.

Although I don't have any myself, IF I was an on-site tradesman of some sort, the modern plastic Systainer-type thingies would be MUCH preferable I think.

About the only use I can see for these big tool chests would be for a tradesman wholly shop- based if he/she changed employer and had to move his tools on a one-off basis to another shop.

So a useless space-waster for a hobbyist.

NOT trying to be provocative, no doubt many will disagree - just my own take.


I didn't even think about the weight consideration - like I said it was a silly old idea of mine. I get the notion of a tradesman packing up their tools into one big trunk / chest and moving on. Use a trolley or some friends and hope that it doesn't happen too often! I guess they were quite impractical in some regards.
 

Stanleymonkey

Established Member
Joined
15 Jun 2014
Messages
752
Reaction score
11
Location
South West London
D_W":1rznqrr1 said:
A grand idea - your post made me think that the best way to entice people into making the best they can is to create a contest. Make people competitive.

I looked for "3d printer contest" and the first strike was a laser cutter contest:

https://www.instructables.com/contest/CNC2019/

(a studley chest could come out of something like these contests -the promise of glory from winning pushing people further)

From an advertising standpoint, I can't imagine a manufacturer getting much more for their advertising bucks than running a contest and showing the results from experienced users.

Good find - the tank that won it all looks amazing. I think a competition (between youtubers or similar) could yield some interesting results.
 

Inspector

Nyuck, Nyuck, Nyuck!
Joined
18 Jun 2006
Messages
1,646
Reaction score
86
Location
Saskatoon, SK., Canada
D_W I remember watching a show at least a decade ago that showed a titanium structural part being printed for the Eurofighters. Additive printing is way beyond being nice pot metal. :wink: I don't think it will be all that far off before a company starts to make high end hand planes using a metal printer. :shock:

Stanleymonkey I know what the tool cases you have in mind are like but I can't help but think they will end up much like the useless blow molded cases power tools come in. :( Now if you were to standardize the modules so they fit together like Lego then the tool cases could be clicked together as you got the tools. :idea: #-o

Pete
 

Just4Fun

Established Member
Joined
21 Sep 2017
Messages
508
Reaction score
30
Location
Finland
AES":2f2fqc0m said:
For me anyway, these things are a nice idea, and they look great, but are totally impractical as soon as they've got more than about 3 or 4 small tools in them! And size-wise, far too bulky to move around easily, even empty.
Whilst I agree with you 100% I do think it is sad because I am sure a good tool chest would be a great project to do. There are also endless tweaks one could make to fine tune it to suit your own tool collection. It is a pity the end result would be of such limited practical use.

For me the only real benefit would be that it might encourage me to organise my tools rather than have each tool strategically located where I used it last.

I regularly take tools away from home but for that I use a couple of rucksacks that were deemed too scruffy for my son to take to school. These are good for tools, having loads of compartments so I can at least pretend to be organised.
 

Dovetaildave

Established Member
Joined
16 Apr 2012
Messages
279
Reaction score
2
Location
London uk
I know what the tool cases you have in mind are like but I can't help but think they will end up much like the useless blow molded cases power tools come in. :( Now if you were to standardize the modules so they fit together like Lego then the tool cases could be clicked together as you got the tools. :idea: #-o Pete[/quote said:
Don't the Dewalt cases have little clips on the lids, connecting to base of same?


I did use a large wooden tradesman's chest when I restored in an Antiques warehouse, on a four wheeled dolly it was perfect for working around the warehouse, without the need to move the furniture down to the back where I had the workshop set up.
When customers wanted my attention, a turn of the key locked the contents inside away from sticky fingered individuals, doubled up as a very sturdy workbench as well. Even without any powered tools, it was wayyyy to heavy to lift single handed, handtools only still took two men to lift safely.

At another workshop I copied another restorer who had gone the Bisley route. He resigned after an explosive argument and simply wheeled it out to a waiting taxi using a sack barrow. The avaricious old workshop owner just stood in shock as the taxi pulled away, 5 minutes start to finish the coolest exit I'd ever seen.
I now own six, If you do want to store heavy powertools I'd advise the 20/40KG ball bearing runner types a-la Hafele.

Regards,
Dave
 

Vann

Established Member
Joined
15 Oct 2008
Messages
1,832
Reaction score
5
Location
Petone, New Zealand
AES":23yugk2y said:
...Which is why I'm often surprised to see WIPs here making such tools wooden chests - AND my local specialist tool dealer has ready-made wooden ones for sale, with or without tools.

For me anyway, these things are a nice idea, and they look great, but are totally impractical as soon as they've got more than about 3 or 4 small tools in them! And size-wise, far too bulky to move around easily, even empty...

...About the only use I can see for these big tool chests would be for a tradesman wholly shop- based if he/she changed employer and had to move his tools on a one-off basis to another shop...
When I started my apprenticeship (railway workshops, 1973) one of the first training projects was to make a tool chest. Not something fine like the Studley and Schuster, but a rimu box 34" x 16" and 17" high. Handsaws in the lid, three sliding/removable drawers inside, etc.

As we would move to a different part of the shops every 3 months or so, we also made trolleys with handles so we could tow them with us for each move, or move from carriage to carriage as jobs progressed. Perfect. I still have mine in my workshop at home.

We didn't carry powertools. If something needed planing you'd use a fixed surface planer (Wadkin, Smiths, etc) scattered around the shops or your handplane from your toolbox. If you needed a portable powered tool you'd get one from the store (if the storeman was in a good mood :roll: ) in exchange for a tool token.

Arrr, them were the days :wink:

I guess the modern equivalent is the tradie's Hiace van.

Cheers, Vann.
 

D_W

Established Member
Joined
24 Aug 2015
Messages
4,542
Reaction score
14
Location
PA, US
Inspector":3tx2lnn0 said:
D_W I remember watching a show at least a decade ago that showed a titanium structural part being printed for the Eurofighters. Additive printing is way beyond being nice pot metal. :wink: I don't think it will be all that far off before a company starts to make high end hand planes using a metal printer. :shock:

Stanleymonkey I know what the tool cases you have in mind are like but I can't help but think they will end up much like the useless blow molded cases power tools come in. :( Now if you were to standardize the modules so they fit together like Lego then the tool cases could be clicked together as you got the tools. :idea: #-o

Pete
Yes on the high end of things. Sintered high end metals. I believe the pot metal equivalent will be coming, though. Kind of like high speed steel. Start with absurdly wonderful tungsten has, and then the race is on to replace it with something cheaper.
 

Stanleymonkey

Established Member
Joined
15 Jun 2014
Messages
752
Reaction score
11
Location
South West London
Dovetaildave":1k3dwgmj said:
I know what the tool cases you have in mind are like but I can't help but think they will end up much like the useless blow molded cases power tools come in. :( Now if you were to standardize the modules so they fit together like Lego then the tool cases could be clicked together as you got the tools. :idea: #-o Pete[/quote:1k3dwgmj said:
Don't the Dewalt cases have little clips on the lids, connecting to base of same?


I did use a large wooden tradesman's chest when I restored in an Antiques warehouse, on a four wheeled dolly it was perfect for working around the warehouse, without the need to move the furniture down to the back where I had the workshop set up.
When customers wanted my attention, a turn of the key locked the contents inside away from sticky fingered individuals, doubled up as a very sturdy workbench as well. Even without any powered tools, it was wayyyy to heavy to lift single handed, handtools only still took two men to lift safely.

At another workshop I copied another restorer who had gone the Bisley route. He resigned after an explosive argument and simply wheeled it out to a waiting taxi using a sack barrow. The avaricious old workshop owner just stood in shock as the taxi pulled away, 5 minutes start to finish the coolest exit I'd ever seen.
I now own six, If you do want to store heavy powertools I'd advise the 20/40KG ball bearing runner types a-la Hafele.

Regards,
Dave
Bisley route? Is that the metal drawer people dabbling in tool boxes?

That sounds like me storming out after a big row. 5 minutes later I'd be back looking for me coat. Ten minutes later - looking for my glasses!!
 
Top