• We invite you to join UKWorkshop.
    Members can turn off viewing Ads!

silly person question of the day....

UKworkshop.co.uk

Help Support UKworkshop.co.uk:

Cozzer

Established Member
Joined
13 Jun 2017
Messages
326
Reaction score
517
Location
Derbyshire
Shiplap garden shed, lined with 3/4" ply to (1) keep it windproof and (2) to stop it falling down.
No power, other than extension lead from house when required.
I have a couple of 12v batteries in there, which I swap over every so often so that one of 'em can be charged by the solar panel sited in the window. Each battery is hooked up to some (surprisingly bright) LED lights, so if I venture in after dark at least I don't smash a toe/knee against something that shouldn't be there....
So...the silly person question.
I spent about 30 minutes in there this morning - looking for something that turned out to be in the house anyway - and coudn't get over how bloody cold it was.
Is there anything "heater"wise - apart from setting fire to the shed - I can run off the 12v job when I'm in there, just to take the chill off?
Don't get me wrong - I don't intend spending hours in there, but just to warm me up on an occasional visit....
 

guineafowl21

Established Member
Joined
28 Oct 2015
Messages
670
Reaction score
210
Location
Inverness
LED lighting with a 12V battery is one thing, heating is quite another. Any significant heater would drain it massively.

You’d be better with a small, 12v-powered diesel heater for caravans. Have a look on ebay - quite expensive for what you want, but it’s nearly Christmas and you could use it for other things.
 

Fitzroy

All the gear...
Joined
12 Mar 2013
Messages
1,863
Reaction score
958
Location
Aberdeen
Brought back memories, we had one of the bad boys in my dad's pharmacy on a chilly morning when I was a boy.
VALOR-Portable-Mobile-Gas-Heater-with-Regulator.jpg
 

Yojevol

Clocking on
Joined
29 Jan 2017
Messages
916
Reaction score
381
Location
Cheltenham
Well I've just invested in 2 heaters running at 5V. They purport to give 5000, yes FIVE THOUSAND mAH of
heat and can keep going for
up to 18 hours.

Seriously, keeping your feet warm is a good start
Brian
1637947318950.png
 

Steliz

Camberwell Carrot
Joined
11 Dec 2017
Messages
430
Reaction score
57
Location
Hungary
If you can run an extension for tools then you can plug in an oil radiator.
 

rob1693

Established Member
Joined
4 Nov 2017
Messages
192
Reaction score
307
Location
Sheffield
I just got one of these off ebay for £30 to restore for workshop when I'm not creating my own heat old valor 525r
 

Attachments

  • Screenshot_20211122-140757_eBay.jpg
    Screenshot_20211122-140757_eBay.jpg
    128 KB · Views: 3
  • Screenshot_20211122-140910_eBay.jpg
    Screenshot_20211122-140910_eBay.jpg
    141.7 KB · Views: 3
  • Screenshot_20211122-140859_eBay.jpg
    Screenshot_20211122-140859_eBay.jpg
    117.1 KB · Views: 2

Jacob

Pint of bass, porkpie, and packet of crisps please
Joined
7 Jul 2010
Messages
22,127
Reaction score
2,376
Location
Derbyshire
There's a horizontal radiant propane heater with a grill (can't remember the make) which you can also grill sausages on, or kippers if you want to deter intruders. They can get a bit smoky if you cook on them.
 

Peri

Established Member
Joined
11 Jun 2012
Messages
413
Reaction score
486
Location
Shropshire
My shed (single car garage) is fed by an extension lead as well - and I use a simple fan heater, about the size of a shoebox. It warms up enough in about an hour to be able to work in there.

Edit - just read you don't plan on being in there very long - sorry, dis-regard :)
 

Cozzer

Established Member
Joined
13 Jun 2017
Messages
326
Reaction score
517
Location
Derbyshire
Thanks for all the replies, boys.... cheers.
Yes, as I expected - socks seem to be the answer for a 15 minute visit!
About the only other thing that struck me was the gamut of 12v car windscreen demister jobs that appear on a well-known auction site, but hardly the answer.
Some of the images featured are truly inventive!

Thanks again.
 

XH558

Established Member
Joined
25 Oct 2020
Messages
93
Reaction score
43
Location
Sawbridgeworth
Layers are the solution for working outdoors for any length of time in cold conditions.
Base layer of a material that can wick away moisture from the body.
Intermediate layers that insulate and keep you warm
Outer layer that provides the protection from the elements.

Thin socks then thicker walking type socks for the feet with trainer of walking boot type footwear.
Normal underwear then......Tights but please as the owner if you can borrow them or they may get a bit possessive.....
Tee shirt then something like a brushed cotton shirt or something like a thin jumper that will trap air. Fleece type garments are great for this
Thicker fleece for the outer layer.

Head covering is important as we lose most of our body heat through the head.

Then gloves of a fingerless design so you can grip your work.

You don't want to end up looking like the michelin man but the layers allow you to remove clothing if you are exerting a lot of energy and to add the layers as you cool down to maintain body heat.

Hope that helps.
 

MorrisWoodman12

Established Member
Joined
11 May 2017
Messages
224
Reaction score
177
Location
Deepest Sussex
I
Well I've just invested in 2 heaters running at 5V. They purport to give 5000, yes FIVE THOUSAND mAH of
heat and can keep going for
up to 18 hours.

Seriously, keeping your feet warm is a good start
Brian

I guess @Yojevol since you mention socks you realise that mAHr is not any measure of heat output. It's a measure of capacity as in batteries.

If it lasts 18 hours then only 5000/18 = 277mA is drawn. At 5V it's a 1.3W heater! Not even going to keep your toes warm. Better keep your socks on. 🥺🥺🤣

Thanks for the mental gymnastics this morning 🤣
 

Stevekane

Established Member
Joined
24 Feb 2018
Messages
402
Reaction score
144
Location
Nr Bournemouth
Layers are the solution for working outdoors for any length of time in cold conditions.
Base layer of a material that can wick away moisture from the body.
Intermediate layers that insulate and keep you warm
Outer layer that provides the protection from the elements.

Thin socks then thicker walking type socks for the feet with trainer of walking boot type footwear.
Normal underwear then......Tights but please as the owner if you can borrow them or they may get a bit possessive.....
Tee shirt then something like a brushed cotton shirt or something like a thin jumper that will trap air. Fleece type garments are great for this
Thicker fleece for the outer layer.

Head covering is important as we lose most of our body heat through the head.

Then gloves of a fingerless design so you can grip your work.

You don't want to end up looking like the michelin man but the layers allow you to remove clothing if you are exerting a lot of energy and to add the layers as you cool down to maintain body heat.

Hope that helps.
Definately the way to go, quite by accident I discovered that pulling my baggy working trousers over my Joggers worked incredibly well, it has to be cold though otherwise you bake! My other great buy was an Aldi Yellow coat like the road workers wear, light, waterproof and with a nylon padding and a high fleecy collar thats really warm, it was only about £17 three years ago and I wear it for everything.
Ive mentioned it before but for your information I understand that an Infra Red radiant heater provides instant heat and only warms you standing in front of it rather than the body of air that is your entire shed,,Im happy to be told otherwise but thats what a guy who installed them in old churches told me.
Paraffin and bottled gas give off lots of condensation,,maybe not an issue in a draughty old shed?
Steve.
 

quintain

Established Member
Joined
25 May 2007
Messages
83
Reaction score
22
Location
West Cumbria
As with other replies consider 'layers'...2 x pair of army surplus thermal one piece, wear one when its cold outside wear the other as well when it B****y cold outside.
 

Spectric

Established Member
Joined
19 Feb 2015
Messages
3,614
Reaction score
1,871
Location
North Cumbria
Visit an an army surplus store and look for the norwegian artic suits, one piece and fur lined. Another line is to look at the gear sold for people working in refrigerated storage. Best option is to not work in the cold, look at jobs you can do indoors such as designs and plans until the weather breaks.
 

hairy

Established Member
Joined
16 Nov 2017
Messages
222
Reaction score
94
Location
Ecosse
Army surplus "softie" trousers are about a tenner, jacket about £30 and super toastie warm from fleabay.

I used to go up a shoe size for boots on site to wear three pairs of thick socks in the winter. Then I bought some merino base layer trousers and suddenly my feet were warmer, now only one pair of socks required.

Merino and possum hat and gloves (with or without fingers) are also very recommended, cheapest usually from Ray Mears online shop unless you want bright colours. The hat for £20 is amazing.
 

Cozzer

Established Member
Joined
13 Jun 2017
Messages
326
Reaction score
517
Location
Derbyshire
Well, it's Saturday evening, the new storm has hit, it's blowing a gale, we've snow and now ice on the deck, and I've just had my dog out for the last walk of the day. He doesn't know it, but I most certainly do.
No matter what I wanted out of my shed tonight, it's staying there!

Keep warm and safe, everyone.
 

Yojevol

Clocking on
Joined
29 Jan 2017
Messages
916
Reaction score
381
Location
Cheltenham
I guess @Yojevol since you mention socks you realise that mAHr is not any measure of heat output. It's a measure of capacity as in batteries.
If it lasts 18 hours then only 5000/18 = 277mA is drawn. At 5V it's a 1.3W heater! Not even going to keep your toes warm. Better keep your socks on. 🥺🥺🤣

Thanks for the mental gymnastics this morning 🤣
I am pleased to announce that they were delivered today and I immediately put them on trial. The batteries come with 4 power output settings. On the highest setting the claim is that they will last for 3-3.5 hours. On the next setting, 4-5 hours. Next 6-8 hours and on the lowest setting, 15-18 hours. I've just run the batteries down having been wearing the socks for 7 hours on the 2nd lowest setting, so the claim is about right. For the first 3 hours I was in my work boots in the workshop with the log stove going. Normally in this situation I would come back indoors feeling generally warm but with cold feet. This evening I am looking forward to going to bed with warm feet - a luxury I haven't experienced in winter months for a good few years.
Whatever the Amp.Hour rating is the socks HAVE kept my feet, not just my toes. for many hours.
Brian
 

Sandyn

Established Member
Joined
19 Jul 2020
Messages
1,542
Reaction score
1,272
Location
Scotland
it's a 1.3W heater! Not even going to keep your toes warm.
1.3W would give a sensation of heat in your foot, especially over a few hours with good socks and shoes. It's a small area to heat. It only needs to be a couple of degrees above body heat to feel warm.
 
Top