Quantcast
  • We invite you to join UKWorkshop.
    Members can turn off viewing Ads!

shower pumps

UKworkshop.co.uk

Help Support UKworkshop.co.uk:

RogerS

Established Member
Joined
20 Feb 2004
Messages
17,391
Reaction score
77
Location
In the eternally wet North
Does anyone have any experience of the centrifugal pumps sold by Bathstore.com? In their blurb they say that they are quieter than one from Stuart Turner...true..the ST pump I have is a bit noisy in use but it is also reliable.

But before I choose to go down the centrifugal pump route I thought I'd check here first

Cheers

Roger
 

jasonB

Established Member
Joined
26 Nov 2004
Messages
5,044
Reaction score
0
Location
Surrey
I fitted one of their whole house pumps in a flat, the guy only used it once and the neigbours complained, they are much noisier than the easyboost ones that I usually fit. Do you need the whole house setup or is it just for a shower?

Jason
 

jasonB

Established Member
Joined
26 Nov 2004
Messages
5,044
Reaction score
0
Location
Surrey
Although I prefer the furniture I do quite a few kitchens & bathrooms as well, here are a few of the ones I have done.

Jason
 

RogerS

Established Member
Joined
20 Feb 2004
Messages
17,391
Reaction score
77
Location
In the eternally wet North
Very nice, Jason. I particularly like the Oast range and the first picture answered one question that was bugging me for ages..namely where does the waste pipe go on those standalone baths! All the bathroom brochures (in common with hifi brochures) suffer from not showing any nitty-gritty like pipes or cables. Now I know. Straight down...good news for the flat below :wink:
 

RogerS

Established Member
Joined
20 Feb 2004
Messages
17,391
Reaction score
77
Location
In the eternally wet North
I have fitted a twin Salamander ESP.CPV pump to feed the whole flat (negative head option selected). My prior experience with pumps was fitting a Stewart Turner pump to drive a power shower in another property. The Turner pump works perfectly.

The Salamander pump comes with loads of electronic gizmos and I consistently get it going into lockout mode. (In fact, I have tried a second Salamander pump and that locks out as well.)

I know that the Turner pump doesn't have all these gizmos. It's possible that the water is getting aerated and that of course stops the Salamander pump.

Guess my question is this ..'Is the Salamander too damn fussy in its' requirements for perfect operation' and would it be simpler to just ditch them on eBay and buy a couple of Turner pumps instead? I am reluctant to rip out the cold and hot water tanks just to satisfy the requirements/quirks? of the Salamander
 

jasonB

Established Member
Joined
26 Nov 2004
Messages
5,044
Reaction score
0
Location
Surrey
Where have you taken the hot water feed from?

I took it from the top of the cylinder and found that the pump was sucking air in down the expansion pipe. Had to drill the cylinder and fit an essex flange in the side. This cured the cutting out but it was still noisy.

Jason
 

Travis Byrne

Established Member
Joined
4 May 2004
Messages
253
Reaction score
0
Location
Oklahoma, USA
Hello everyone

I have to ask a dumb question
why do you use a pump in your home?
Is this to up the water pressure or to pump waste water out?
I don't have a pump but maybe I need one, :oops:

Travis
 

Chris Knight

Established Member
Joined
14 Jan 2004
Messages
6,641
Reaction score
3
Location
SE London - NW Kent
Travis,
Generally pumps are need to increase the pressure to modern bathroom stuff especially showers. So many are now being imported from Europe where the standard supply pressure is much higher than here (we still use the infrastructure the Victorians gave us - heck there are still a few Roman sewers in use! - and it won't take the high pressure) and the ID (something like a quarter inch) of a lot of the pipes to the taps is too small for an unpressurised supply if you want to shower in less than a week..
 

jasonB

Established Member
Joined
26 Nov 2004
Messages
5,044
Reaction score
0
Location
Surrey
They are to boost the pressure of the stored hot & cold water. In this case from approx 0.1 bar to 2.0 bar, not sure what that is in PSI. Infact if Roger is using the negative head setting then he has zero pressure at the shower head as the top of his storage tank is below the level of the outlet.

Jason
 

Chris Knight

Established Member
Joined
14 Jan 2004
Messages
6,641
Reaction score
3
Location
SE London - NW Kent
Jason has reminded me that continental systems often have the whole hot water system pressurised (ie mains pressure) not gravity fed with a tank iin the roof.
 

les chicken

Established Member
Joined
14 Feb 2005
Messages
426
Reaction score
0
Location
south wales
1 bar is equal to 14.7 psi. I have the reverse problem where I live, our water pressure averages 6 bar or nearly 90 psi. We have our shower connected to an individual hot water gas boiler gives out 14 litres a minute need to keep the drains clear. The problem arises where manufacturers will not honour guarantees as the pressure is too high.

Les
 

RogerS

Established Member
Joined
20 Feb 2004
Messages
17,391
Reaction score
77
Location
In the eternally wet North
Jason...not a lot of choice as the hot water tank and cold water tank came as a pre-installed unit in the 50's. No way of getting an Essex flange in...other than replacing both tanks....not an ideal solution :cry:

Your point is very well made and I had not thought about the pump sucking water down the expansion pipe. The Salamander instructions also state that the outlet of the cold water tank that feeds the pump should not be immediately below the cold infill....ah well...when starting from scratch guess that's easy to do.

Anyway delighted to say ...nay chuffed... that pump 1 gave me 3 error lights. Pump 2 gave me a full house with 5 error lights lit. That was sufficient information for the guys at Salamander to tell me that the pump hadn't been commissioned correctly...guided me through the process (simple but NOT in their instruction bumf :evil: ) and all seems to work OK...so no major replumbing work.. :D

Travis...what everyone else has said.... now we in the UK seem to be going for more stylish continental taps..these come with a very small bore and we don't have enough pressure in our cold/hot water tanks to cope...hence we need one of these pumps to drive the whole house/flat.

Can't remember from my many trips to the US whether you use a similar system ie mains pressure to some taps..usually kitchen for drinking purposes; a separate cold tank (fed from mains but now at a lower pressure as it's sitting in a tank) and a hot water tank (indirectly heated from the central heating system) that is also fed from the cold water tank.
 

Travis Byrne

Established Member
Joined
4 May 2004
Messages
253
Reaction score
0
Location
Oklahoma, USA
Thanks for the answers.
Here in my little hamlet, the pressure is 60+lbs in the summer time, but when ereryone is watering lawns, the pressure down some. In the winter months,, the city drops the pressure to about 50 psi.
Most of the new shower heads have the small hole in them. Water Savers is what they are called here. I don't like them but still able to get clean. 8)

Travis
 
Top