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Should it squeal when I cut it?

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Dickymint

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Hello UKW forum, great site!

I fairly new to making saw dust in the garage, so please excuse my terminology as necessary.

I am part way through converting a 6 1/2" x 10' green beech log (split into 6' & 4' lengths) into planks and I am experiencing quite a lot of squealing when I feed the wood onto the blade.

I have recently upgraded to 4tpi 1/2 " blades supplied by New Forest Saw co and after their advice feel that I have got the tensioning about right (I'm not suffering from tracking of line) and the guide adjustment I belive is as should be.

So preamble over should it squeal when I cut it?

Thanks.
 

Alf

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Welcome to the forum, Dickymint. :D You seem to have come across one of those rare cases of a log that hasn't been fully stunned before being subjected to the saw. Hit it over a likely knot with a hammer until it shuts up. :wink:

I'm already en route to the door, and will wait for the sensible answers... :-# (could it be binding slightly behind the cut and rubbing on the blade? Just a thought)

Cheers, Alf
 

Keith Smith

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You haven't said which bandsaw you have but it basically sounds like you are asking too much from it. To cut this thickness of timber you really need an industrially rated machine with a 3/4 inch 3tpi blade.

This is particularly so as the timber is green, it will be softer therefore easier to cut but the dust becomes a sticky mass and clogs the blade hence the squealing, even a slow feed rate won't help much.

Sorry I can't be of more help.

Keith
 

Chris Knight

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Lots of possible reasons!

1) Blade related

- poor quality blade - don't know the one in question
- too slack (try not to be too scientific, just wind up the tension)
- too fine (4tpi is a bit too fine to clear the sawdust and I would prefer to use a max of 3 and preferably 2 tpi for green wood. The waste will compact in the gullets very easily and bind, causing screeching - especially if there is:-

2) Operator trouble
- feeding wood not in line with the natural cut tendency of the blade so it binds on one side
- too fast a feed (the numero uno mistake). the waste is not cleared from the cut fast enough, so the blade starts to jam, to heat up and to jam worse as it expands etc.
- as it expands, it slackens which worsens things
- it starts to bend or kink out of a vertical straight line, which worsens things
- well you get the idea?

3) wood trouble.

- the kerf is closing on the blade - just wedge it open at the free cut end with something - a screwdriver, a chisel, a bit of wood in a wedge shape.
- The cut wood is bowing and you are feeding straight ( so problem is same as under "Operator Trouble point one).


Have a look at this lot and see if you pass all the tests then revert.
 

CHJ

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Alf":n1i5gpem said:
<snip> (could it be binding slightly behind the cut and rubbing on the blade? Just a thought)

Cheers, Alf
If this is the case Dickymint try putting a wedge in the cut behind the blade asap to help, place subsequent wedges down the log as cut progresses.

(not to brutally, else you may encourage splitting)

Edit: Late again with the post, sorry about the duplicate advice as per. Chris' No.3 but got delayed with lightening strikes this end.
 

Dickymint

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Alf Posted: Tue Apr 26, 2005 6:11 pm Post subject:

You seem to have come across one of those rare cases of a log that hasn't been fully stunned before being subjected to the saw. Hit it over a likely knot with a hammer until it shuts up.
Alf thanks for the reply however:
a) isn't that just a tiny bit cruel?
b) if not how hard should I hit it?

:lol:

Thank's for all your responses so far, when I get back in the garage I'll try a wedge. Re the clearance of the waste, could well be the problem as after the cut is complete there has been quite a lot of damp dust which has stuck to the side of the plank which has to be rigourously rubbed before it comes off.

Oh, btw it's a record BS300 and so far it's been one of the most used toys, er sorry, tools in the garage.

WH37 now it couldn't possibly be down to operator error......... :shock: could it?
 

Travis Byrne

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Hello Dickymint
Welcome to the forum
Just before you pull all your hair out, try this.
If your bandsaw has differant speeds, try using one that is a little faster.
If already in the fastest speed, then lower the speed one gear and give it a try. Adjust your feed accordingly.
Good luck :D
Travis
 

Dickymint

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Travis Byrne":31rons47 said:
If your bandsaw has differant speeds, try using one that is a little faster.
If already in the fastest speed, then lower the speed one gear and give it a try. :D
Travis
Thanks TB, so, er, hmmm, any thing goes then? :?

I'm running on the low speed setting to increase the torque due to the thickness of the log. Tried the higher speed but the saw didn't like it.

Cheers, DickyMint
 

MikeW

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Dickymint":2pam7ydh said:
...I have recently upgraded to 4tpi 1/2 " blades supplied by New Forest Saw co and after their advice feel that I have got the tensioning about right (I'm not suffering from tracking of line) and the guide adjustment I belive is as should be.

So preamble over should it squeal when I cut it?

Thanks.
Welcome Dickymint!

When I have cut green logs I have found that due to the moisture and or sap content I have to use a blade that cuts with a wide kerf due to the spring-back of the fibers and or the moisture.

It is possible that the blade you have which would otherwise be a good blade for resawing dried lumber is not good for green timber.

Good luck,
 
A

Anonymous

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Hi Dickymint,
before we go any further, I have to ask, did you know Ken Dodd's dads dog's dead? :D

Anyway, enough showing my age! Bandsaws.

I'm not sure what sort of blade your 4tpi 1/2inch one is, but a skip tooth type is best for resaw work as it has wide gullets between the teeth (hence skip tooth) so it will clear the debris from the kerf more efficiently than a regular pattern tooth.
As others have mentioned, wedging the cut as you progress should give it more chance of clearing as well.
I would be inclined to get a 3/4in wide blade (i think this is maximum for the record 300)and get the biggest skip pattern available.

cheers,

Andy
 

tim

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Welcome to the forum

Where is the actual squealing coming from? I had a similar situation not so long ago where the guide bearings were too tight to the blade and this was the problem - moving them a fraction further apart solved it.

However, I also think that the advice you have already been given is very sound!

Cheers

Tim
 

Dickymint

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I have to ask, did you know Ken Dodd's dads dog's dead?
Andy, very observant, spot on, met him once back stage, called me Dickymint he did, after one of his diddymen clan, the mental scars are deeply imbedded......

The blade I'm running has regular spacings between the teeth, so I guess it's not a skip tooth.

Re the 3/4" blade I have found on my BS300 that when you fit a 3/4" blade and re-align the upper blade guides properly the cutting height is reduced because of contact between the main blade guide/thrust bearing adjustment assembly and a piece of the metal body that's bent down to act as a ? actually I don't know what it does but it gets in the way. To avoid this obstruction you have to bring the guides back to approx 3mm from the back of the blade which leaves the blade seemingly without adequate support.

If any one has a technical solution to this, er, issue I would welcome some feed back.

Cheers, by jove, what a nice day for etc, etc.
 
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