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engineer one

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see alf i'm being a good guy. only one topic at a time!!!!!!!! :lol:

having some gotten good ideas about the bench, the next step will be
shooting board, and a mitre board. i recently saw a board with
like a cotton real on the end you plane toward. this appears to stop you
before the end of the board, so what do you do when you
have to turn the board over? has any one used one of these boards.
or is there an even better design about?

bout time i built something other than cupboards and bookcases! :lol:
paul :-k
 

Derek Cohen (Perth Oz)

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Hi Paul

Here are a few pics of my shooting board - one of my most used tools. It is a "ramped" version, the advantage of which is meant to lie with the blade cutting at a skew (but this is so slight that I don't believe it makes a lot of difference). The only other advantage is that the blade wear is spread rather than concentrated at one point, as in a flat board.

The basic design here was "borrowed" from the HNT Gordon version (after Terry Gordon let me play with his). However I modified it so that mine is wider and also incorporates a detachable mitre fence.

A few pics:

http://www.woodworkforums.ubeaut.com.au/attachment.php?attachmentid=3556

http://www.woodworkforums.ubeaut.com.au/attachment.php?attachmentid=3557

Here is it with attached mitre fence:

http://www.woodworkforums.ubeaut.com.au/attachment.php?attachmentid=3558

And the attachment:

http://www.woodworkforums.ubeaut.com.au/attachment.php?attachmentid=3559

I later modified the fence, changing it from a "fixed" to an "adjustable" version. This made it possible to more easily set it up for perfectly accurate cuts.

http://www.woodworkforums.ubeaut.com.au/attachment.php?attachmentid=9496

Hope this is useful.

Regards from Perth

Derek
 

engineer one

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derek that looks great.
is there any advantage to making it in say mdf. would there be more
stability?
yours seems to be a hard wood what is it??
and do you have any dimensions please.
paul
 

MikeW

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Hi Paul,

Here's a couple more. The first one I use for shooting veneer when I edge glue.

The second one is for both angles and 90* shooting. It converts by removing the angled portion as seen in the 3rd photo. I have a few different angled "heads" I use for different purposes.








Take care, Mike
 

Matt1245

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Just made my own shooting board from jumbled plans in my head(not a very organised place).

It's a bit rough and ready, but seems to work a treat, and glad to see it's pretty similar to everyone elses.

Matt.
 
A

Anonymous

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Derek and Mike

Nice shooting boards.

After watching Rob Cosman's DVD on Drawer making I know I have to make a better one then my current shooting board.

Dan Clermont
 

Chris Knight

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I find an indispensable accessory for shooting boards is the humble Post-It note. They are excellent for adjusting the angle a smidgen, when place at one end or other of the workpiece between workpiece and fence.
 

bugbear

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I later modified the fence, changing it from a "fixed" to an "adjustable" version. This made it possible to more easily set it up for perfectly accurate cuts.

In the immortal words of Bob Wearing: "if you can't make it accurate, make it adjustable"

BugBear
 

Derek Cohen (Perth Oz)

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derek that looks great.
is there any advantage to making it in say mdf. would there be more
stability?
yours seems to be a hard wood what is it??
and do you have any dimensions please.
Paul

I made a couple of shooting boards out of MDF, one straight and one mitred. These work very well, are quick-and-easy to build, and cheap. Construction is 1/4" MDF over melamine-covered MDF.

http://www.woodworkforums.ubeaut.com.au/attachment.php?attachmentid=3393

The ramped board is Jarrah, and the dimension can be anything you like. Aim for 12" wide for the top. The runway needs only to be wide enough for the plane.

Check out this link to Michael O'Connor's website for his (HNT Gordon) shooting boards: http://www.michealconnorwoodwork.com.au/workbenches.html

BB wrote:
In the immortal words of Bob Wearing: "if you can't make it accurate, make it adjustable"
Amen!

Regards from Perth

Derek
 

engineer one

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ok guys some really nice ideas,but.
as i mentioned originally in the post, i recently saw one in a magazine which seemed to have a device to stop you going to the end of the board.

does anyone remember it, or have any idea why?

based on what i have seen in this post since one is only taking small amounts off, so, break out should be no problem, but am i correct.?

and as i said, if you do not plane to the end of the board, then how do you ensure a square edge when you turn it over?

paul :?
 

Chris Knight

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Paul,

It takes very little time to make a simple shooting board. I suggest you make one and see what you like/dislike about it - I am sure you will soon devise improvements that suit your way of working.
 

Alf

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engineer one":2ggppw85 said:
ok guys some really nice ideas,but.
as i mentioned originally in the post, i recently saw one in a magazine which seemed to have a device to stop you going to the end of the board.

does anyone remember it, or have any idea why?
Yes, I do. It was in GWW #... erm, the one without a number. :roll: Why, I don't know. Either it was in a desperate bid to do something "different" or the writer didn't understand how to use a shooting board properly, which would surprise me given the good tips he's consistantly provided in the past. Nothing in the world would induce me to deliberately and repeatedly plane into a stop.

engineer one":2ggppw85 said:
based on what i have seen in this post since one is only taking small amounts off, so, break out should be no problem, but am i correct.?
As long as your fence is in good nick, nope, it shouldn't be a problem. If necessary, a back-up block can be used even if the fence is in a dire state.

engineer one":2ggppw85 said:
and as i said, if you do not plane to the end of the board, then how do you ensure a square edge when you turn it over?
Basic stock prep goes Face, Edge, Width, Thickness, square one End, Length (FEWTEL), so your edges should be parallel so in theory it'd work. But it's not necessary.

Cheers, Alf
 

bugbear

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based on what i have seen in this post since one is only taking small amounts off, so, break out should be no problem, but am i correct.?
You are correct, if the plane is sharp enough.

additionally...

If you're careful, your fence will "back up" the cut. But one careless stroke will cut into the fence, so this is a council of perfection, and perhaps not applicable to the real world.

But it's rather easy to take a chisel, and cut a chamfer on the rear edge, up from your knifed line. This pretty much stops any "spelching" IME. It's a technique often recommened when planing end grain in general, and works just as well when you're using a shooting board.

BugBear
 

engineer one

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thanks alf and bugbear, both reiterate what i thought, but its nice to check
and maybe second guess the magazines which were all that we had to
check with before this forum.

so the only other question that stems is in the old days they used to suggest that the end stop was a sliding fit into the main board, and i got the impression that you left the end stop just a little shy of being
level with the shooting board itself, so that you would not actually nick it
the amount would only need to be about 1-2mm to ensure that the
blade does not nick it.

but you are right, i need to practice with my own board, and get used to
the things.
paul :wink:
 

bugbear

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so the only other question that stems is in the old days they used to suggest that the end stop was a sliding fit into the main board, and i got the impression that you left the end stop just a little shy of being
level with the shooting board itself, so that you would not actually nick it
the amount would only need to be about 1-2mm to ensure that the
blade does not nick it.
Ya' got that backwards. The reason for the sliding fit (normally a tapered dovetail) was to allow the stop to be moved out as the innevitble cuts to the end of the stop occurred.

In the sliding dovetail, a small shaving from the rear face of the stop allows the sliding to occur, by decreasing the width of the stop.

BugBear
 

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