Quantcast

She's called my bluff - now what ?

UKworkshop.co.uk

Help Support UKworkshop.co.uk:

Mdotflorida

Established Member
Joined
7 Nov 2003
Messages
275
Reaction score
0
Location
South Wales
After years of moaning about furniture quality and design, Er indoors finally let me splash out on a workshop and decent machines. Now that said workshop is complete she wants to see some return in the form of indoor projects.

First on the list is built in bedroom wardrobes as we've just had this room remodelled. As this is going to be my first project using expensive hardwood, I don't want to mess up. :?

Can anyone recommend some good reading on the subject of carcass and door construction.

If this doesn't go right I will have to deal to my wife. :cry:

Jeff
 

johnelliott

Established Member
Joined
16 Apr 2003
Messages
1,105
Reaction score
0
Location
Near Swindon, Wiltshire
I'm going to have to say that wardrobes are not a good choice for hardwood construction due to the comparitively large sizes involved, and the need to use thin sections to keep the weight down.
How about a couple of bedside tables, maybe a headboard?
John
 

Martin

Established Member
Joined
25 Jan 2003
Messages
202
Reaction score
0
Location
Guildford UK
Mdotflorida":1krojmpu said:
Can anyone recommend some good reading on the subject of carcass and door construction.
Jeff
Jeff - I can very much recommend Andy Rae's book - see http://www.amazon.co.uk/exec/obidos...194/sr=1-14/ref=sr_1_2_14/026-4224888-7068459.

Nicely presented in full colour with lots of hints and tips, not just on design, but also tools, jigs, techniques. He covers just about everything, including:

- working tips (material selection, preparation, marking out, glues etc. etc.)
- furniture design
- box, case, shelf, drawer, door, frame, leg, face frame etc. construction
- hardware (nails, screws, fastners, drawer runners etc.).
- bases, feet, aprons, raised panels etc.

Martin.
 

Mdotflorida

Established Member
Joined
7 Nov 2003
Messages
275
Reaction score
0
Location
South Wales
johnelliott":tzrxe4bp said:
I'm going to have to say that wardrobes are not a good choice for hardwood construction due to the comparitively large sizes involved, and the need to use thin sections to keep the weight down.
How about a couple of bedside tables, maybe a headboard?
John
Thanks for the reply John,

I am very willing to listen to the voice of experience. The wardrobes will basically sit in pre built recesses so I was thinking along the lines of veneered ply for the internal carcass and solid wood doors. What materials would you suggest. At the moment the wardrobes are the primary requirement. After them will come the rest of the beroom furniture to match. Maybe down to ignorance on my part but I figured that basic built in wardrobes shouldn't tax my limited joint making skills either.

Jeff
 

andrewm

Established Member
Joined
30 Oct 2003
Messages
609
Reaction score
0
Location
Cambridge, UK
I'll second Martin on the book recomendation.

I have just completed a set of wardrobe carcasses. Built in in-so-much as they extend right across the end of the room. I used maple-veneered 19mm MDF with solid maple edgings held together with biscuit joints. They look reasonable, I didn't make any doors because I had already decided that I wanted aluminium framed glass doors. The drawers were the most complex part and were constructed from 12mm birch ply. There were more individual parts on the set of drawers than everything else put together. When I get everything cleared up I will try to post some pictures.

I used maple but I have since learnt that the correct timber is cedar because it is supposed to have moth repelling qualities. Still maple was selected to fit in with the rest of the room.

So, yes, fitted wardrobes might be a good place to start but be aware that manoeuvering the bits and the glue-up gets quite heavy.

Andrew
 

Steve Maskery

Established Member
Joined
26 Apr 2004
Messages
11,705
Reaction score
49
Location
Kirkby-in-Ashfield
Andrew
Sounds like a big job. Drawers are time-consuming, aren't they?
Just on the matter of cedar, there is nothing wrong with using maple for your wardrobe, or any other clothes-storage units, a small piece of cedar inthere will do the trick. Traditionally it was blanket-chests that were lined with Cedar of Lebanon, (not the same as Red Cedar, I think), for the reasons you mention. I have used Cedar of Lebanon on a drawer bottom and even after several years it still stinks (sorry, has a unique aroma) when I open the drawer. A small block of cedar in each drawer will have a suitably repellent effect on moths, and probably any women you try to chat up wearing your Lucky Jumper.

Did you know...at the Alhambra Palace in Spain, much of the woodwork is made of Cedar and survives to the present day because it doesn't rot, because it's resistant to insects and fungus?

Ooh, this Forum is just SO educational.

Cheers
Steve
 

Chris Knight

Established Member
Joined
14 Jan 2004
Messages
6,641
Reaction score
1
Location
SE London - NW Kent
I'll third Andrew on the book recommendation. Jim Tolpin's book - Built In Furniture" is a good book too. Some great ideas and a good "how-to" selection sprinkled through the book.
 

CYC

Established Member
Joined
23 Jul 2003
Messages
670
Reaction score
0
Location
Kildare, Ireland
I totally agree with Rural, I have those books too and find them brilliant. The cherry wardrobe in this particular book is beautiful and I plan to do it in Oak.
 

Adam

Established Member
Joined
10 Sep 2003
Messages
3,768
Reaction score
0
Location
UK
Steve Maskery":jp7qumwx said:
Traditionally it was blanket-chests that were lined with Cedar of Lebanon, (not the same as Red Cedar, I think), for the reasons you mention. I have used Cedar of Lebanon on a drawer bottom and even after several years it still stinks (sorry, has a unique aroma)
Cheers
Steve
Red Cedar and Cedar of lebanon are different. However I like working with both. I use Normal cedar for bee hives as it's rot resistant and very very light. Cedar of Lebanon to line cabinets for moth repellent and 'cos I like the smell.

Adam
 

johnelliott

Established Member
Joined
16 Apr 2003
Messages
1,105
Reaction score
0
Location
Near Swindon, Wiltshire
Drawers are relatively quick if you can persuade yourself to use Blum Tandem (undermount) drawer slides and a false front. I make my drawers with pocket screws, no one can see them behind the false fronts or unless they take the drawer out and look at the back.
John
 
A

Anonymous

Guest
Hi all

I often hear that cedar of lebanon is useful for drawer bottoms because of the nice odour. I am now wondering what does it smell like? Anyone care to enlighten me?

BTW I quite like Andy Rae's work too - especially for people unfamiliar with tecniques
 

andrewm

Established Member
Joined
30 Oct 2003
Messages
609
Reaction score
0
Location
Cambridge, UK
Drawers are relatively quick if you can persuade yourself to use Blum Tandem (undermount) drawer slides and a false front. I make my drawers with pocket screws, no one can see them behind the false fronts or unless they take the drawer out and look at the back.
That is exactly what I did use although I am still considering adding the BlumClose soft close mechanism because it just seems to exude an air of quality.

What I didn't do is use false fronts, the sides were glued directly to the front which has proved surptisingly accurate, maybe helped by the use of the WoodRat. But, no matter how accurate the cutting is it won't fit if the design is wrong in the first place (as discussed here: https://www.ukworkshop.co.uk/forums/viewtopic.php?t=2790)

Never tried pocket screws. The jigs always seem incredibly expensive for what they are.

Andrew
 

Latest posts

Top