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Shelf pin drilling/routing system

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Lockwood

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Hello all, this is my first post.

I make built-in furniture, and up until now I've been using Shelf Support Strip, Screw Fixing, Steel, 10 x 5 mm, Intervals 15 mm - Häfele U.K. Shop. In my opinion they look smart and have generally worked well. However, they do make decorating more difficult (we don't paint the cases, it is done by a third party after fitting) and also the strips themselves are not cheap. Cutting the strips to length etc. also takes a little more time than I would like.

I've been considering moving to a shelf pin system, I wanted to know what could be a good method. I already have a Festool OF1010 router, so I have been considering the LR32 approach but I can't quite work out what accessories would be required, and thus how much the shopping list would cost. Another potential approach would be Robot Check.

I should also add that we tend to set our support strips either 50mm in from the edge or 80mm in, and it can happen that we are working to a scribed edge (thus no easy place for a fence to ride).

What are the pros and cons of the different methods out there?

Many thanks for the shared wisdom!

Jonathan
 

Jonathan S

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For years ive been using hafele 3mm support pins.....I did my own testing and they held up as much as the big 5 or 6mm support pins.
For some reason I only use tonk strip in schools......

For drilling the 3mm holes I've made up my own jig in hardwood, they last for years.....a few years ago I started doing the drilling with a lightweight festool txs (when using a heavy drill the arm got tired and the jigs got worn quickly) and started using there expensive brad point bits and never looked back.
Also I always do the drilling when the cabinets are made up and referance the jig on the bottom of the cabinet, this way you don't get wobbly shelves.
 

RobinBHM

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I made a jig out of 10mm birch plywood

basically I made what looked like a giant sawtooth edge, with the pitch of 32mm

I made it with a morso guillotine -easy to make, I cut a load of ply offcuts 32mm, 64mm, 96mm, 128mm -then used them as a stop.

to use the jig, I set up a router with a guide plate and a 5mm drill.

you clamp the jog to the work, rout away.

and here's the great advantage: using a router with a guide bearing, its possible to machine up a load of jogs from the original.

I had a fair few of them, some about 700mm long for base cabinets, some 1800mm long for tall bookshelves.....so one set up does the whole row of holes.
 

Ged S

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I have the Mk II Parf guide system for drilling 20mm holes a la MFT worktop. As an added advantage, this is perfect for drilling accurate 3mm holes at 32, 48 and 96mm centres, vertically and accurately. Coupled with Hafele 3mm pins as suggested by Jonathan S, job done.
 

petermillard

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I have the LR32. I bought the kit but you don’t need it all - I only use it for shelf-pin holes, so just use the ‘holey rail’ and router baseplate. I had a pal turn me a pair of 32mm ally discs tapped in the centre for M8 (??) to fit through the rail holes. I use these to bear against the base of the carcass, and made a jig to set where the holes are drilled.

I’ve drilled these holes every way imaginable, and I‘be found a router with dust collection etc... to be the easiest by far, if you do them more than occasionally.

I show my setup around 5:30 in this video.

HTH P
 

Lockwood

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Hello all, thanks for all the input, it's been really helpful! I've tried to read up on all the information you've given (and followed the various rabbit holes that they lead to). I had no idea that making shelf pin holes could be done in so many ways!

I've been looking carefully at my set-up and the space I have available, and it leads me to think that the jig from Germany may well be the best option for me. I have a Luton van rigged out as a mobile workshop, and space is very tight. Added to the fact that my sister and I work together and are sometimes in the van doing different things at the same time it means that space is at a premium!

With the jig, am I right in thinking that I need to also order a guide bush? I have a Festool 1010 router and a Makita 3612C. I already have a couple of Festool clamps so that will probably do for clamping.

Peter, thanks for the link to the video, I watched through the whole series. It looks like I do fairly similar work to you, and I picked up some useful tips!

Thanks again for the input.

Jonathan
 

petermillard

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Thanks, good to hear it helped. And thanks @Hammer Time for the link to the SauterShop jig - hadn’t seen that one; I’m doing a few bits and pieces with SauterShop soon, I’ll see if I can get my hands on one 👍👍

And yes, it looks like you need a bush/copy ring for your router - there’s a link in the body of the description. BTW if you didn’t get redirected, the English-language version of their site is SauterShop.com

cheers, Peter
 

PAC1

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I use the Bosch holey rail which works well. The problem I suffer is the holes fill up with paint which then needs cleaning out.
 

sometimewoodworker

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Hello all, this is my first post.

I make built-in furniture, and up until now I've been using Shelf Support Strip, Screw Fixing, Steel, 10 x 5 mm, Intervals 15 mm - Häfele U.K. Shop. In my opinion they look smart and have generally worked well. However, they do make decorating more difficult (we don't paint the cases, it is done by a third party after fitting) and also the strips themselves are not cheap. Cutting the strips to length etc. also takes a little more time than I would like.

I've been considering moving to a shelf pin system, I wanted to know what could be a good method. I already have a Festool OF1010 router, so I have been considering the LR32 approach but I can't quite work out what accessories would be required, and thus how much the shopping list would cost. Another potential approach would be Robot Check.

I should also add that we tend to set our support strips either 50mm in from the edge or 80mm in, and it can happen that we are working to a scribed edge (thus no easy place for a fence to ride).

What are the pros and cons of the different methods out there?

Many thanks for the shared wisdom!

Jonathan
I have the kreg jig and the LR 32 rail and system in the systainer

if you are only doing a few and using the standard offset the kreg jig wins

the German jig would be a disaster for me as there is no single place for the holes and I’m sure that dust buildup would be a problem

If you have other festool items and do a lot the LR32 is the hands down winner, the offset is variable, the holes are very difficult to get wrong, as Peter said if you miss drilling one you can easily go back to the exact position it should be in.

I don’t have the number of holes to drill that Peter does so I use the system, the only items I don’t use are the OF1010 mounting points as I use an OF1400
 

RueFondary

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I also have the Kreg jig and the Festool LR32 setup (not the full kit, but close to it, as buying piecemeal everything but the 35mm cutter and the systainer box resulted in a significant saving)... The Kreg jig is fine to add extra holes in situ, but the result is definitely not as good as what one gets with a router.

Setting up the Festool system takes time, and using it requires a bit of concentration, but the results are good for on site or limited volume production. Of note, I do use a Festool router with it, but with a bit of creativity it's possible to make 'adapter plates' for other smallish 'plunge' routers.

I did contemplate getting the Bosch "Starship enterprise" kit which sits in between these two solutions. The fact that the router plate is made of plastic and that it only comes with a 800mm track led me to go for Festool's solution, but it's a contender for limited volume production
 

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